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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I'm new to the forum and I'm buying a Crew Max this fall. I'm looking for a little input. I'm going to be towing a 32' TT weighing about 9K wet. I'm planning on getting the SR5 package and tow mirrors. Do you recommend the TRD package? Will the heavier suspension be helpful or will the off road tires be a hinderance? Also, do you know if the TRD package raises the height of the tundra? Will I have any issues pulling this size trailer (I know it's under the towing capacity). Thanks all!

-Dave
 

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With that size of a trailer you might want to think about diesel....You are pretty close to the max and if you are towing a lot, a 3/4 or even 1 ton may be better suited.....Now before anyone yells at me, yes the crewmax will pull it and it will pull it fine....I would forget about the trd and get air bags or helper springs....
 

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Don't pay any attention to the nay-sayers. I have been towing a 33 foot TT that weighs in at just a hair under 9000 lbs with no trouble at all! The 5.7 liter driveline and the factory tow package is almost the equivalent of a GM 2500. All you need is a WDH with sway control which you would need with any truck, even a diesel. It pulls grades better than anything Ford or Chevy makes and even has a slight edge on the Dodge Hemi. If you have any other questions just holler.
 

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It really would depend on how often you tow. If you only tow it a couple times a season and use the truck as a daily driver, then the Tundra would be a good choice. If you tow all the time, then it would be better to get a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel.

Either one will need a good brake controller the Teknosha P3 is proly the best one. If you go with the Tundra, I'd suggest some airbags.
 

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Oh yea the 5.7L CM will not have a problem with it. Its not the lenght its the weight and thats all that really matters. Ive got a DC SR5 TRD and towed my 9K toyhauler through the Rockys twice now, to and from, with out a problem, tow haul mode is great and so it the option on being able to choose the gear for a hill climb. Your are going to need a HD hitch though.

As far as the trd package, TRD trucks have less rake than non-trd trucks do. The front is usually about and inch higher and the TRD comes with 275/65/18 tires vs. 255/65/18 on the non-trd, the suspension is a little stiffer on the trd and i kinda like that bt if your just driving on the highway there is really no need for it, unless you like the rims or fog lights, both could be added aftermarket though.

And one more thing. If your towing all that weight the first thing you should do after buying that truck is get some E-rated tires. They making towing a lot more comfortable and lane changes wount be sloppy anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you everyone for the inputs. I thought it might be a good idea to get the air bags. I've been told I wouldn't need them but for the price I'm sure it won't hurt. I should have been more specific. I intend to pull the Jayco Jay Flight G2 32BHDS. I considered a Dodge 2500 but it costs much more and really doesn't seem to have anything over the Tundra CM. Tundra just seems to be the equivalent to many 3/4 ton trucks. I believe the Jayco dealer also recommended the equal-i-zer hitch with dual cam sway control. Is this suitable?

Any other suggestions for options on the truck and/or trailer? This is my first TT (I drove my grandfather's once back in the day - '76 Torino with a 23' Skamper...good times) and we're really looking forward to it. I just want to be as safe as possible (I'm carrying 4 kids and a beautiful wife here). Thanks again guys!

-Dave
 

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I just want to be as safe as possible (I'm carrying 4 kids and a beautiful wife here). Thanks again guys!

-Dave
Well, since you brought it up...how about photo (of the beautiful wife I mean) :devil:

And the SR5 should come with the Tow package (extra radiator cooler, etc)
 

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Weight distributing hitch, E-rated tires, brake controller and sway bar is all you'll need to take off and have a good time with your CM Tundra. It pulls our 30' TT like its' not even there! Pulls our 28' boat with fuel like nothing! Hae a great time!!:)
 

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Get the airbags with a TRD sway bar and pull like a diesel. Those combined make a huge improvement.
 

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Sorry, I forgot to mention the brake controller. Otherwise ditto all the good things other folks have said. I tow a Jayco Jayflight G2 31RKS. Jayco makes a great trailer and you will have great times with yours. I haven't needed air bags but your trailer is a little heavier and they won't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the tips guys. Also, for those of you with the TRD package, does the TRD add any height (ground clearance) to the crew max? Is it a worthwhile package?
 

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It's been said by numerous members on this forum and others, that the TRD does add some stability while towing. IMO, i like the TRD package and i'm glad i went with it. They have the Bilstein shocks, which are good quality but the ride while empty is a little harsh to some. Myself.........i like the ride.
It should add about an inch ride height on the CM as well.

The equilizer brand hitch is a good one with the solid bars. Don't get the ones with just the chains, as they don't provide the stability the bars will.

As well as others, i beleive you'll be tickled with the towing performance of the tundra. Whatever you do, BE SURE it has all the necessary factory installed towing items such as; trans temp guage, aux trans cooler in front of radiator, PS cooler, factory hitch w/ 7-way harness, oh.......and the 5.7 L motor of course.

Others commented on going diesel........... i beg to differ big time on this. Unless you'll be towing 5-days a week, 300+ days a year there is NO NEED for a stinky high priced, rough riding diesel IMO.
 

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I tow a similar weight in a 22 ft toy hauler. The TRD is stiffer which helps when towing. Your biggest help would be the E range tires. I went with the BFGs and I really like them. If you want to save some coin, pass on the TRD pkg and drive from the dealer to the tire shop and get the E range tires, then add the air bags. I cant comment on the sway bar cuz I do not have one. I dont want to be dragging it in the Glamis sand when I drop off the road with the trailer. Pass on the diesel, more maintenance, noise and moving parts. In my exp. the fuel economy isn't that great to justify the added maint.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the info guys. I think I'll definitely go with the CM w/ TRD and upgrade the tires aftermarket. The equal-i-zer with the solid bars is exactly what I had in mind. And airbags too. As for diesel, yeah, I couldn't justify the expense. Thanks again!

-Dave
 

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I have a 5.7L Tundra which I use for towing up to 8500lbs over 20,000 towing miles. Pay attention: Buy a diesel. Get a used newer ford or Chevy if you have to. Here's why: Torque and mileage. Although the Tundra has 400lb-ft it is at 3400RPM vs. 1600rpm for the diesel. Your trans will be shifting alot with that load and with your combo the mileage will be about 7-8mpg. There will be more drama towing that load than with the F250 and 2500 chevy, not alot, but more. With the diesel, you will just cruise at 70mph like the trailer is not even there. You want to tow with your whole family in the car, the diesel is the way to go.

The Tundra is a great all-around truck with decent turn-radius, good handling, comfort, and good stereo. And it can tow some. But if you really want to tow 9000lbs easily with the least amount of drama more than once a year, get a diesel.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the info fzust. How come you don't use a diesel? You seem to have no problem pulling 8500 (which is about what I'll be pulling). Also, the family weight isn't an issue (yet) as they're all under 45lbs :)

I really can't afford a diesel. Would you suggest going with a smaller trailer?
 

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Thanks for the info fzust. How come you don't use a diesel? You seem to have no problem pulling 8500 (which is about what I'll be pulling). Also, the family weight isn't an issue (yet) as they're all under 45lbs :)

I really can't afford a diesel. Would you suggest going with a smaller trailer?
I am an engineer so I tend to analyze things to death. I tow a race car. The curse of everyone that likes fast cars is that if you like them enough you buy a racecar. Then you have to buy a truck to tow the race car. So the guy that likes sporty, nice handling cars drives a truck around. :sad3d:

So I was looking for something I could live with everyday. The half-ton trucks really are so much more civil than they used to be. Handling is so much better, stiffness and cowl shake are much better etc. etc. This is also very true comparing to the Heavy-Duty 3/4 and 1 ton(F250 & F350 or Chevy/Dodge 2500/3500)

The 1/2 ton trucks have a turn radius of about 44' vs the HDs 49-50'. Typical full-size SUV is still 39' or so.

When I was purchasing I know I wanted the torque for pulling and the 401lb/ft on the 07 Tundra was class-leading at the time. However the torque is only there above 3000rpms. In order to keep the mileage decent, I had to slow down to 60mph and baby the throttle to keep it in 6th gear. I was towing a 24' Box Car Hauler with sway control and weight distribution hitch. Since then I sold the trailer and got a lightweight aluminum low-profile car trailer. Cut the towed weight in half and reduced the frontal area by about 2/3s. This has made a huge difference. Now I tow at 70mph with no sway or weight distribution. Additionally it is much less stressful coming down a mountain.

How often will you tow?
How many miles will you tow in a year?
So how tall is the trailer? tall i.e. 11' or 12'
Will you daily drive this truck?

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Oh and the dual-cam sway control is absolutely worth it. I used 800lb bars you should probably use 1000lb. I have TRD on my truck and I like it. The handling is sharper. It does raise the truck, but just to the level of a 4WD. You will need to adjust the headlights down, though maybe not with airbags. Either way no big deal. One downside to the TRD, the bed bounce is horrible, but that is only in a few places(of course I have to drive over those places all the damn time!) Again answer the questions above and I'll help all I can.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks fzust. I'll probably be towing 6 or 7 times a year, maybe a couple thousand miles total annually (4K max probably). The trailer is 11.1' tall (w/ A/C unit) and weighing 9,750 (completely loaded with 2,000lbs of stuff...highly unlikely). I will be driving the truck daily. It'll be more of an every day commuting truck more than a towing truck. I'll drive it about 10-15 minutes to work every day. Thoughts?
 

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9750 IS NOT 9000. You are starting to push the ratings of this truck. The 10,400 listed capacity is based on a 150 lb driver and a full tank of gas. Start adding passengers, tools, miscellaneous stuff to the bed as well as the added pressure from the WDH and that capacity begins to diminish rapidly. Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating GCVWR (Fully loaded Trailer Plus Fully loaded Tow vehicle) is 16,500. 16,500 - 9,750 leaves you 6750 for the fully loaded tow vehicle with WDH force applied. My truck on the scales with passengers, myself, full fuel, and WDH engaged is approximately 7000 + the 8500 trailer leaves me at 15500 that's a 1000 lb cushion which I'm happy to have. I always seem to have to load something else in that was never there when I weighed the truck. Keep an eye on these kinds of things

And I don't care who you are or what you're driving. ALL Tow vehicles feel a 9000 lb load. Even the big tractor trailers know it is there I know this from experience. The difference is that some tow vehicles are better designed to handle those loads and in fact handle better with the load. (Just try bob tailing a cab over tractor for any distance, it's much better with some weight on the back) 4 1/2 tons never disappears behind any tow vehicle.

I tow 8500 lbs weekly with 4 full size passengers and miscellaneous stuff in the bed. I plan on upgrading to E Rated tires when the current ones wear out. I do get some bounce from the current passenger tires that are on it now. Everything else is stock, no airbags, no suspension upgrades at all. Just a Reese/Drawtight WDH with 10000 lb bars and friction sway control. Trailer stability is mostly about how well balanced the load on the trailer is and how level it sits when loaded and hitched. Spend the time to setup your hitch properly and practice loading your trailer then take it on short drives to test the stability. For me the 5 mile drive to the scale over a very bad patch of freeway is enough for me to know whether I have it balanced or not. The scale confirms weight distribution over all axles and capacity.

Last but not least Speed makes a difference on fuel consumption and safety. With my current load on California freeways I get 11.5 MPG if I keep it at or under 55, at 60 I get about 10 MPG, above 60 the MPG drops fast and sway gets much harder to control. It's just aerodynamics and inertia doing what they do. Heck you're on vacation, plan ahead, slow down, and enjoy driving that nice truck. Not only will you get better MPG, it will be safer. When Towing upside down (Tow vehicle weighs less than trailer) things can go bad quickly, the faster you drive the faster it can go bad.

Whatever you decide on your truck/trailer purchase, just remember to keep doing your homework and asking questions. Watch out for outrageous claims like "I don't feel that 9,000 lb load going up hill at 70 in high winds!" Take it all with a grain of salt.

Enjoy the trailer!!
 

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Thanks fzust. I'll probably be towing 6 or 7 times a year, maybe a couple thousand miles total annually (4K max probably). The trailer is 11.1' tall (w/ A/C unit) and weighing 9,750 (completely loaded with 2,000lbs of stuff...highly unlikely). I will be driving the truck daily. It'll be more of an every day commuting truck more than a towing truck. I'll drive it about 10-15 minutes to work every day. Thoughts?
Your towing miles are HALF of what i do every year, and i'm completely satisfied. Terry Downing has made some good points, so listen to them.

Going slower will yield better mileage, and it WILL be safer. I drive a little faster ( speed limit here ) at about 70-72mph with our 5er, and i get usually between 9-9.5 mpg. My dad pulls a 9klb fiver at 65 and gets 10mpg with his tundra. And we have a lot of hills here to pull, so i don't see you getting any worse. And beleive it or not, the diesels are NOT yielding much better. Try about 1-2 mpg better, and they still have to slow her down to get that mileage.

Yeah, 2000lbs of stuff would be unlikely, but should you tow WET you'll be there. Most of the time i tow without water in the tanks ( or 1/4 tank or so ).

As a daily commuter, you will not enjoy driving an HD truck no matter what brand you choose. They ride rough, have handling issues, braking issues, and they're just not fun to drive IMO. The tundra's your vehicle of choice here I beleive.

If you wanted to find a smaller trailer that weighed about 1k lbs less, you'd feel more comfortable towing it. But if you're stuck on this one, the tundra will do just fine.
 
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