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I'm removing the right-side cam shaft in my Tundra using the Haynes Repair Manual as my guide. I've done all the prep as directed in the manual, removed the timing belt, cam sprocket, and valve cover and am ready to loosen the cam bearing cap bolts.

The manual directs me at this point to align the cam timing marks on the drive and driven gears at a 10-degree (up) angle using a wrench on the hex portion of the exhaust cam (see attached illustration). That I can do, but the cam is in tension in this position - it stays in this position, but just barely, wanting to rotate back to rest at 0-degrees. I'm concerned that when I loosen the bearing caps, the cam will rotate back to rest at 0-degrees. The manual makes no mention of this, nor why it is only required for the right side cam.

Have I missed something in the set up that would cause the cam to want to be at rest at the 10-degree angle?
What is the purpose of this 10-degree angle?
Will removing the bearing caps in this configuration lead to problems later when I'm trying to reinstall the cam/timing belt?

Please - no speculation (I can do that on my own): Does anyone have first-hand knowledge of this procedure that can share their experience and wisdom?

Rob :frusty:
 

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Did y get any answer or solution on this? I think I will be having to pull my camshaft as I think I screwed up the bearing on one of them somewhere....help?

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If I understand the system correctly, the tension is there in order to keep the gears in constant contact and to allow for "no-play". When aligning the camshaft gears, there's a bold you need to insert on one of the cams, closest to the gear. This holds the tension in place in order for you remove it without it springing back.
 
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