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Discussion Starter #1
I was hoping maybe we could compile a list of culprits that would cause the Tundra to get real ****** MPG,

My computer says im getting historically ~14 MPG. however when I use the Range function the Miles remaining drops really fast its supposed to go down every time you use a mile worth of gas but the distance I travel/speed im traveling makes it real hard to believe.

All I can think of:

1. Dirty air filter
2. Use a fuel system cleanser
3. Winter time gas is supposed to be underperforming mpg wise??

anything you guys want to ad?
 

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Here's some probable causes -

1 - Quality of fuel
2 - Weather conditions
3 - Traffic conditions
4 - Weight in truck
5 - Tire pressures
6 - Brake drag
7 - Lead foot induced by Led Zepplin II played on 4000 watt stereo drawing too much power from the alternator causing parasitic drag on engine :D
 

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Warming the truck up in the morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
you guys are bringing up some great issues ive overlooked, Thanks, in terms of fuel ive stuck to Chevron and Costco 87 as its what the truck can accept, any of you guys using 89 or 91?
 

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I have 33x12.5 and i get about 14 on average. When pulling a trailer it drops to 7.
 

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I was hoping maybe we could compile a list of culprits that would cause the Tundra to get real ****** MPG,

My computer says im getting historically ~14 MPG. however when I use the Range function the Miles remaining drops really fast its supposed to go down every time you use a mile worth of gas but the distance I travel/speed im traveling makes it real hard to believe.

All I can think of:

1. Dirty air filter
2. Use a fuel system cleanser
3. Winter time gas is supposed to be underperforming mpg wise??

anything you guys want to ad?
Measure by hand over several tanks before you do anything else. This is the only method I really trust. Top off, set trip meter, drive, fill up. Divide number of miles on trip meter by number of gallons it took to fill tank. Keep doing it over a number of weeks. Do a spread sheet or some other list, then compare.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Measure by hand over several tanks before you do anything else. This is the only method I really trust. Top off, set trip meter, drive, fill up. Divide number of miles on trip meter by number of gallons it took to fill tank. Keep doing it over a number of weeks. Do a spread sheet or some other list, then compare.
I might have to do that...just to update:

I filled up half a tank (college student so sometimes I cant fork $$ for a full one)

the computer said Range : 180 Miles

as of now my Odometer trip says Ive traveled 44.5 Miles and now my Range Computer says 114 Miles. Ive reset the battery and have babied driving her.....so now im at a loss:confused:
 

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1) Giving a ride to 4 elephants.
2) Driving away from the sun (the gravitational pull burns up gas). Best to drive at night. Or towards the sun n the daytime.
3) Using brakes. Brakes are for cowards. Get rid of them.
4) College student? Leave the textbooks at home. They are heavy and you can always share when you get there.
5) Don't eat before you drive.
6) DO visit the bathroom before you drive. Not only will you save weight, but you won't get caught with the urge to go while you are driving and therefore drive too hurriedly and waste gas.
7) Only put mellow tunes on the stereo.
8) If you notice an old smell and a ringing noise in your ear, remove the parking brake. Thats a great gas saver.
9) Know where you are going. Getting lost usually wastes gas.
10) Keep your truck clean. dirt can be heavy.
11) Don't keep you truck like my daughter keep s her car. Carting around a lot of crap you dont need becasue you can't be arsed to take it indoors wastes fuel. (Actually, she is way better now!)


Now. seriously:

1) that ethanol crap will reduce your mileage.
2) lots of short journeys will kill your mileage, as will stop/start traffic. No matter how gentle you are, getting our trucks up to speed is a gas guzzler.
3) I wonder if you are always the one giving rides? If you are at college, are you able to walk to class? If so, you will be saving a short journey AND you wont be the default driver.
4) point 11 above is onlyhalf joking.
5) You CAN save gas by not filling up every time, but only putting in a half tank or less. That saves weight. but, is it worth it?
6) You would be surprised how much you need to baby it to really 'baby it'. acceleration is not your friend and even a quarter throttle is too much.
7) Oil changes. Keep em regular. I've heard people on this forum report better mileage goimg to synthetic. don't know the specifics.
8) Tire pressures. Check 'em when you fill up.

Esentially, if you have a stock vehicle, the two things that will kill your mileage are acceleration and weight. On top of that, the thing that will WASTE the money you've just spent is braking. So, anticipate. No need to burn the rubber if you have to stop in another 200 yards.

Most importantly though, these are not fuel sipping vehicles. Never meant to be. And gas really isnt the most expensive part of owning a vehicle. even for gas guzzlers like these. If you are cash poor enough that gas consumption is a major factor in you budget, you might want to crunch some numbers and get something smaller until you are done with college.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
1) Giving a ride to 4 elephants.
2) Driving away from the sun (the gravitational pull burns up gas). Best to drive at night. Or towards the sun n the daytime.
3) Using brakes. Brakes are for cowards. Get rid of them.
4) College student? Leave the textbooks at home. They are heavy and you can always share when you get there.
5) Don't eat before you drive.
6) DO visit the bathroom before you drive. Not only will you save weight, but you won't get caught with the urge to go while you are driving and therefore drive too hurriedly and waste gas.
7) Only put mellow tunes on the stereo.
8) If you notice an old smell and a ringing noise in your ear, remove the parking brake. Thats a great gas saver.
9) Know where you are going. Getting lost usually wastes gas.
10) Keep your truck clean. dirt can be heavy.
11) Don't keep you truck like my daughter keep s her car. Carting around a lot of crap you dont need becasue you can't be arsed to take it indoors wastes fuel. (Actually, she is way better now!)


Now. seriously:

1) that ethanol crap will reduce your mileage.
2) lots of short journeys will kill your mileage, as will stop/start traffic. No matter how gentle you are, getting our trucks up to speed is a gas guzzler.
3) I wonder if you are always the one giving rides? If you are at college, are you able to walk to class? If so, you will be saving a short journey AND you wont be the default driver.
4) point 11 above is onlyhalf joking.
5) You CAN save gas by not filling up every time, but only putting in a half tank or less. That saves weight. but, is it worth it?
6) You would be surprised how much you need to baby it to really 'baby it'. acceleration is not your friend and even a quarter throttle is too much.
7) Oil changes. Keep em regular. I've heard people on this forum report better mileage goimg to synthetic. don't know the specifics.
8) Tire pressures. Check 'em when you fill up.

Esentially, if you have a stock vehicle, the two things that will kill your mileage are acceleration and weight. On top of that, the thing that will WASTE the money you've just spent is braking. So, anticipate. No need to burn the rubber if you have to stop in another 200 yards.

Most importantly though, these are not fuel sipping vehicles. Never meant to be. And gas really isnt the most expensive part of owning a vehicle. even for gas guzzlers like these. If you are cash poor enough that gas consumption is a major factor in you budget, you might want to crunch some numbers and get something smaller until you are done with college.
haha :tu:

all true, its not a cash poor situation its more of like "man what the hell I just filled her up, there goes my weekly money for booze and ammo"

on a serious note ive checked all the tips everyones given, what else could cause this?

an exhaust leak somewhere? although I dont know what couldve caused it...
 

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The string came un-tied?
 

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Gave this some thought. Notice you are not filling up all the way. Therefore, the vehicle doesn't really know how much fuel you put in, as it expects a full tank. It then takes its capacity, which it knows, then calculates fuel used and works out what is left. Without a full tank, it has to rely solely on the fuel gauge sender, which is really a guesstimate at best. Parking on an incline will exacerbate the inaccuracy. Best bet is to run a couple of full tanks and calculate by hand. You will likely find you are doing OK.

On a side note, went to visit the in-laws last week. Pretty much I-10 all the way, except for going around San Antonio (I take the loop around). On the way there, I kept mostly between 70 and 80. Got 16.5 MPG. On the way back, stuck to 65. Got 20.5 mpg. This is calculated by hand. filling up before i left, filling up at the inlaws, filling up when I got back.

Now, its not just the speed you drive at that makes such a difference. The largest effect IMHO is that driving at 70 -80 means that you catch up with traffic, have to back off, wait for them to move over, accelerate again and so on. Also, you need to move over more to allow the 80-90 traffic to pass, so you may have to slow down again. Sticking to 65 meant that I kept up a pretty much constant speed the whole journey as that seemed to be the speed of that particular lane. So, less braking, less acceleration, 4 full miles per gallon better.

By the way, around town at home I usually get 14, sometimes 15 if traffic has been lighter that week.
 

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Lift and Larger tires have historicaly decreased gas milage, so when I put mine on I made my wife loose 30 pounds. Yeah, she keeps passing out, but my mileage remains unchanged...
 

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I posted this on another thread but it seems appropriate here.... I regularly get 18 city and 21 highway with a 4x4 and underseat storage loaded with the usual junk. After # 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 wait 3 or 4 tankfulls for the ECU to adjust the fuel delivery before calculating milage. Here's the final word on milage:

1. Open the air intake box, install a aFE Pro Dry-S permanent air filter. Better air flow, better filtering, washable. The last filter you'll ever need. Clean it at every oil change. BTW, these trucks already come with a cold air intake, you don't need a Volant, aFE, etc. Just use a better filter. Result, ~1 to 1.5 mpg improvement.

2. If you're in Calif, Mass, NY close it back up because the fascists in those states "know what's good for you". Otherwise pry the charcoal filter out, right above the air filter. Its "purpose" is to prevent any gas fumes from backing up into the atmosphere. Ridiculous. Result, ~.5 to 1 mpg improvement.

3. With the stock tires, inflate the front to 36 psi and the rear tires to 35 psi. Result ~1 to 1.5 mpg improvement.

4. If at all possible find a place that sells straight gasoline, not the E10 ethanol crap. And use the best grade of gas you can afford (I know that's controversial but I get 1.5 mpg better with 93 octane). If you RTFM and you have a flex fuel rig like me you'll see ethanol 85 will drop your milage in half because its not as powerful as gasoline. The E10 will also cost you mpg. Even the 89 octane will make a difference. When going uphill with a load in the back, with 87 octane the truck will downshift because the gas isn't giving enough energy for the load on the engine. Step up to 89 or 93. Possible ~1 to 2 mpg improvement or better.

5. Try and use only big name gas, Shell, BP, Exxon, Mobil, etc. Avoid Uncle Bob's Gas and Go, Betty's Burrito's and Fuelo's, etc. They will sometimes buy gas that's old or stale and they get a discount for that. Especially avoid those places if they are off the beaten path. Who knows how long the gas has sat in their tanks soaking up moisture.

6. Start replacing fluids with synthetics. They are more "slippery" and also will not break down as fast as dino. Maybe a .5 mpg improvement.

7. If you want to squeeze another .25 mpg consider opening the spark gap NO MORE THAN .005" more - the setting would be ~.049". You might see .25 to .5 mpg improvement, maybe not.

8. COAST when possible. Any slight downhill area you should remove your foot from the gas pedal.

9. Don't accelerate uphill, just maintain and slowly decelerate if possible. When accelerating keep it well under 2k rpm. If no one is behind you and its level ground, just let the truck pick up speed by itself until you can't stand it anymore then give it a touch of pedal.

9. Use cruise control where feasible, flat ground, etc.

10. Keep it at 60 to 65 mph.

Remember this big 5.7 will loaf along at 65 but pushing 5300+ lbs uphill or away from a stop will gobble the fuel.

This thread is now closed. End of story. :amen:
 
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