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Hi guys, I've got a 2006 dc was wondering if changing the timing belt myself is worth the hassle or just have the dealership do it. Any nightmare stories by the do it your selfers
 

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Depends:

Are you experienced in doing such things or are you a shade tree mechanic? If you havent ever changed a timing belt, much less a toyota one and your just a shadetree I would leave it to a qualified shop or dealer.

If you have a clue what your doing and can follow a manual and have the tools then by all means it can be done.
 

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I believe that anyone who is fairly good with a wrench can do a timing belt. Its not particularly hard, but very involved. I haven't done a Tundra, but I have done two 3.4L V6's in a Tacoma and a 4Runner. The only issue I had was the crank bolt on the Tacoma was a real bear to get loose, but the 4Runner was much easier. If you just take your time and follow instructions carefully, I dont think you should have any problems and you will save lots of money, plus have the satisfaction of doing it yourself.
 

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To continue with original poster's question, I am a fair shade tree mechanic. I've personally done three timing belt changes on my 2002 Hyundai Elantra (currently 293K miles). I have ALLDATA service for my 2004 Tundra V8 (currently 110K miles). I have to be honest, I'm a little intimidated by this. You have to take out the radiator, a/c compressor, suspend the p/s, alternator .....

The instructions call for three special tools/tool sets. Do I really need the special crankshaft pully puller or will a standard craftsman three arm work? To stabilize the crankshaft pully it calls for a special spanner. I've used a jury rigged setup on the Hyundai for this but not sure it would fit here. Another special spanner type yoke wrench is called for removing camshaft timing pulleys. Bye the way, why do I want to do that? Can't I just slip off old belt and put on new belt? Are there workarounds for these special tools? I don't want to tie up $200-$500 on single application tools.

Another problem is I've got a coolant leak somewhere. The water pump is suspect. So it would be opportune to change the pump with a timing belt change.

I think I'm really begging you guys to talk me out of trying this and convince me to just take it to the dealer. I'm new to forum. Thanks for any advice.
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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To continue with original poster's question, I am a fair shade tree mechanic. I've personally done three timing belt changes on my 2002 Hyundai Elantra (currently 293K miles). I have ALLDATA service for my 2004 Tundra V8 (currently 110K miles). I have to be honest, I'm a little intimidated by this. You have to take out the radiator, a/c compressor, suspend the p/s, alternator .....

The instructions call for three special tools/tool sets. Do I really need the special crankshaft pully puller or will a standard craftsman three arm work? To stabilize the crankshaft pully it calls for a special spanner. I've used a jury rigged setup on the Hyundai for this but not sure it would fit here. Another special spanner type yoke wrench is called for removing camshaft timing pulleys. Bye the way, why do I want to do that? Can't I just slip off old belt and put on new belt? Are there workarounds for these special tools? I don't want to tie up $200-$500 on single application tools.

Another problem is I've got a coolant leak somewhere. The water pump is suspect. So it would be opportune to change the pump with a timing belt change.

I think I'm really begging you guys to talk me out of trying this and convince me to just take it to the dealer. I'm new to forum. Thanks for any advice.
If you have any hesitation doing this, then don't start it. It's a bear of a job, detailed, and time-consuming. Figure out a dollar amount for worry, effort, and 'opportunity cost' for your time. That should help with the decision.
 

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Some Toyota dealerships have Timing Belt Specials. I just got one in the mail for $289.00. Another consideration is do you need use of the truck? If you do it yourself, it will be out of service for awhile. Plus what if you need new tensioners or something you don't have? Personally, I would let the dealership do it and have them change the water pump and check the tensioners and associated components. Mine total was $673 for the water pump and the timing belt and labor plus coolant. Just my 2 cents. I do a lot of my own work but let the dealership do the what I call "major" work. Sometimes you can find a good mechanic that will charge less. Make sure they are ASE.

Scoob
 

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When I did my timing belt, I already had a balancer puller, but i did spring for some 18" chained vise grips. Also some 2' and 4' lengths of 1" galvanized pipe will help with the crank pulley bolt. The 2' pipe on a ratchet, laid on the driver frame rail, bump the starter and walla the crank bolt is loose. I cut the old accessory belt to the crank pulley size and used the new vise grips to hold that while tightening the crank bolt with the 4' pipe over the ratchet.
I used the toyota pdf/SM as a guide, but can tell you it has some extra steps, like pulling the cam/crank sprockets. If I remember right, the belt tensioner will not slide off its stud until the alternator slides off first, and the alternator won't slide off until the PS pump does either. The fan bracket won't come off until the A/C compresser bolts are pulled. Its best to use it as a guide, but not exactly verbatim.
The lines on the t-belt are useless, use the marks on the sprockets and pretension the belt from the crank to the D-cam, then pretension it from the D-cam to the P-cam, then use a heavy screwdriver to apply tension to the t-belt tensioner pulley and spin the crank twice to verify the marks all line up, then install the hydraulic t-belt tensioner. The A/C compressor and draining the antifreeze took the longest time. It is time consuming, I used 2, five hour days and was in no hurry.
 

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Thanks for the advice guys. I ended up going to the local Toyota garage. I'm paying $640 or so for belts and a water pump. I suspected a pump leak.

Hey Derone, I particularly thank you for suggesting work arounds. You sound like my kind of mechanic. But I just wasn't ready to take this on. It had to be done fast and right. I need the truck back on the road and I'm personally short on time right now.
 
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