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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Want to put one of these when i get my new 5.7, will use it 50% road and 50% sand. Any comments?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I am leaning towards the STT right now but just wanted to know why the bfgs are so popular.
 

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Yeah I am leaning towards the STT right now but just wanted to know why the bfgs are so popular.
because BFG is just known as the baja racing champion tires. I have a buddy who has the bfg a/t's and they suck. dont grip in mud at all, and they dont clean too well either. i personally think they (bfg)'s are overrated and way too pricey.
 

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because BFG is just known as the baja racing champion tires. I have a buddy who has the bfg a/t's and they suck. dont grip in mud at all, and they dont clean too well either. i personally think they (bfg)'s are overrated and way too pricey.
The AT's weren't designed for mud and perform poorly compared to the MTs. BFG MTs are an excellent tire and when the two middle rows are sipped they perform very well on wet and slippery surfaces. They are an excellent mud tire, give good all around performance on rocks and wear like iron. They are expensive and most of us don't really need expensive tires to just drive around in but if you ever get into serious mud conditions 40 miles from the nearest house you'll learn to appreciate a dedicated mud tire and there are better ones out there than the BFG M/T but the SST isn't one of them. For the use you described 50% road/50% sand the SST will do just fine, so save a little money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info.
 

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because BFG is just known as the baja racing champion tires. I have a buddy who has the bfg a/t's and they suck. dont grip in mud at all, and they dont clean too well either.
Like Joe said, they suck in mud because they aren't a mud tire :cool:. There are plenty of good reasons why they have the reputation they do, it is hardly unearned. Tell your buddy to try a new M/T against a new A/T tire in the rain, sand, or rock and he'll see immediately why the A/T is such a good buy, and why Joe said to sipe the M/T. Might also tell the guy that rough looks aren't an indicator of performance in mud. That AT/KO gets "exciting" in red sandstone mud, lemme tell ya :td::eek:.

I saw a blue label 35" Krawler the other day...the center was siped all to hell because otherwise it's worthless on rocks--the DOT compound is durable stuff, and the Krawler pattern in DOT compound is apparently (so he said) worthless in everything until it's siped (ask anyone who runs stock Boggers how they perform in the rain). Apparently blue label Krawlers don't clean or grab well in mud, and don't hook up well on rock...the blue labels are a hard compound, and don't round off and fishscale (best description I can think of) like the red labels.

Anyway the point is, no tire does everything well, and some tires will do one or two things extremely poorly as they are designed to do one thing extremely well. Since we were talking about BFG products...in stock form, I wouldn't take a Baja A/T on the rocks, or an AT/KO in the mud, or an M/T on ice, or a blue label Krawler anywhere except the mall. I'd take any of the first three on the sand, tho, and I'd be biased toward the A/T and Baja over the mud pattern.

IIRC a mud-biased tread pattern is more likely to dig in sand when it spins (ie take a shovel and sand ladders) vs all-terrain patterns which will stay closer to the surface longer when they spin in place. I know this happens in snow (saw a great example about a month ago), I seem to recall hearing the same thing about sand. Ask around...

Other resources would be race-dezert.com, the guys at Arctic Trucks (they took a long trip to the desert a while back), and anyone else who regularly runs and races in sand.

Good luck,
Sean
 
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