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My tundra had its timing belt done March 2005 at 89,000 miles. This is the previous owner. That means it has been a little over 5 years and now my truck has almost 163,000 miles. It appears that the guy before me took excellent care of the truck. I have owned this truck the last 3 years. The first year I had it I drove it hard. I was 17 and you know how 17 year olds are. By the time I was 18 real life hit and I realized I needed to start taking care of it if I want it to last me. Now I'm 20 with a beautiful daughter and another due in august and I still have my truck and it needs to last me. I can't afford the engine to blow due to a timing belt. Should I get the belt done since it has been 5 years even though it has only been 74,000 miles? I feel like I should because it is recommended at 5 years / 90,000. What should I do about this?

From doing some reading on here over the years I think I can remember reading that the breaks on this truck warp easily due to the pistols in the calipers not applying pressure evenly? My breaks have definitely warped easily a couple times and I have simply gotten out the grinder and 'machined' them myself. I also did pads. It always works for a little bit and then it comes back...if i remember correctly I read that using 2004 or up break calipers fixes this problem? If not, what can I do from keeping the breaks from warping so easily? There is a fix for this, correct? I am going to be replacing rotors, pads, calipers, drums, next time I do breaks, maybe before if I have the money.

Has anybody had problems with the streering racks on these trucks? It looks like mine has been weeping for a while, but I haven't had any problems. *knock on wood*. Is this a known issue? Anything I can do to maybe prevent problems?

Transmission. I've read that the transmission on this year truck is iffy. Seems like the issue was something to do with overdrive when towing?

Thank you very much for all your help. This is a great forum.

Travis
 

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In my opinion, i'd wait on the timing belt till you hit 90K. MOST of the timing belts in these engines will go far beyond 90K. Is it a gamble? Yes, but so is just about everything else we do, life is a gamble. The probability of it failing before 90k is relatively low.

The brakes warp due to the rear brakes not being manually adjusted on a regular basis so more stress it put on the front rotors and it over-works them. I put 45K(bought it with 75K and it got totalled at 120K) on my old '01 and i never had the rotors warp. I hauled a good amount of weight sometimes and never had any issues at all. Once you get the hang of it, it only takes minutes to adjust the rears about once a month.

I'm not aware of many people having to replace the rack. Mine was awefully rusted when i bought the truck and thought it wouldn't last a year but it lasted till it's demise without any leaks or issues at all.

The trannies do have a weak OD gear however i feel if you're careful and not push it's limits you should be fine. I've hauled 2500lbs of gravel several times, half cords of wood, asphault, loam, concrete, and lots of other stuff and the tranny performed flawlessly. I also did a drain and fill every year using Castrol Import ATF and everytime i drain her, the fluid looked great.

These are great trucks and will go for a long time with proper care and maintainence. So far in the past 3 months i've hauled 32,000lbs of loam and compost in my '06 1 yard at a time.
 
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