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Discussion Starter #1
First post noob here, so I'm not terribly familiar with the protocols of this particular forum, so please bear with me.

I have an 08 5.7 with 20k miles. Never had an issue until Saturday afternoon. Ran a short errand (30 miles there and back). Pulled it into the garage about 1pm. Go back down to leave again at about 5 pm, fires up, dies after about 2-3 seconds. Same thing again and again, tried for about 10 minutes. All electrical connections, etc. good. Full tank, just bought gas at the same station I bought gas for my Corvette earlier that morning (so I'm assuming it's not bad gas). I say screw it, jump in my trusty old 2000 4-Runner and go about my business.

Go back to the garage the next morning and try it again. It fires up and runs like a champ the rest of the weekend. No check engine light. Thought if it had a hunk of crap on a fuel injector, etc, it should have thrown a code for a lean condition and turned the light on. Called dealer this morning, he says not to worry about it, it was probably flooded? I've never had an EFI vehicle "flood" before, and if it did, I'd think it would turn the check light on for a rich condition code. This is my wife's daily driver she takes kiddo to day care in, etc., and I'd hate to have them stranded. What say the gurus of Tundra Solutions?

Thanks.
 

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sounds like a immobilizer key issue,,,, im not positive but i think i saw a tsb on a no start,, will have to look tomorrow when i go in..
 

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My guess would be an issue with the engine immobilizer. It will act EXACTLY like that. It can happen if there is another key with a chip on your key ring or radio interference.
If it does it again look to see if the immobilizer indicator (red truck symbol) next to the clock is flashing. If it is then that key is not recognized by the ECU.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies. I was using my wife's keys to start it when I had the issue, meaning I had my keys in my pocket, which includes the another key and fob for the Tundra, a chipped key and fob for my Corvette, and a key plus fob for my DD 4-Runner (not sure if the 00 models had chips in the keys or not). So that could very well have been the issue. However, I'm sure I've done the exact same thing before with no issues (used her keys with the others in my pocket), but maybe something was different interference wise that day. In any case, I'll keep that in mind if it happens in the future. Thanks again for the prompt responses.

P.S. - Thinking it was probably just an EFI issuu, I almost asked this question in the Corvette forum I hang out in, instead of signing up for yet another forum. But, I knew I'd just be admonished for having a Tundra in the first place and probably told I got what I deserved for having a "Japanese" truck instead of a GM product, even though my rig was built in San Antonio and there's in Mexico. Anway, it was refreshing. I'll have to come here more often. :D
 

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'flooding' is something that was a potential problem with non FI cars using carbs and would happen when people would pump the gas causing the accelerator pump to pump excessive fuel into the motor. This pumping would cause the plugs to gas foul.

Modern engines do not 'flood'.....unless they have a bad ecu, fuel pressure regulator or other serious problem that wont fix itself by sitting a few hours.

-also....

These engines will run on 4 cylinders....not well but they will run and you can start the motor with 5 cylinders.
(*one bad fuel injector will not keep the motor from running)

Basically.....who ever told you the motor was 'flooded' was smoking something.

~JH
 

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yah the guys here are friendly and they do know there stuff. most of the questions i got are usually ask already anyways. keep us updated on this issue u got
 

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Thing about the 'immobiliser' key thing is that if it fails to read the chip, then you may need to not attempt it again for a short period. Like 5 minutes. I had an oldsmobile with an iffy key and if it failed to 'disimmobilise' (yeah, I just invented the word, but I reserve the right!), it would not accept any attempts to start for several minutes. Not sure if the Tundra is the same, but just throwing it out htere.
 

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Interesting, a guy I worked with out in Albany had the same thing happen to him.

He had made multiple short distance trips in the winter and the truck had not had time to warm up. It wouldn't start after the 3rd short trip. Dealer told him it was flooded and he let it sit for an hour and it started right back up.

I sent him the TSB for the immobilizer issue at any rate, but he hasn't had a problem since he lets it warm up now.
 

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Interesting, a guy I worked with out in Albany had the same thing happen to him.

He had made multiple short distance trips in the winter and the truck had not had time to warm up. It wouldn't start after the 3rd short trip. Dealer told him it was flooded and he let it sit for an hour and it started right back up.
Same thing happened to coworker's wife. She called him at work on a below zero morning cuz the car wouldn't start. By the time he got there, it fired right up. First time I had ever heard anything about an EFI flooding.:beatsme:
 

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sometimes you have to take the key out and reinsert it,,, for some reason on ALL toyotas,
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No issues since. However, the engine was completely warmed up (had just driven approx 30 miles) when I shut it off the last time before the "anomoly" occurred. I still think "it was flooded" is a pretty fishy response from the dealer when talking about a modern fuel injected engine. Thanks for the replies.
 

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I had an efi engine flood but it was due to extreme cold. On a new engine without extremes flooding was not likely. A loose connection or the immobilizer are likely culprits. One member had a loose connection near his gas tank which caused the truck to almost stall. Hopefully it doesn't give you anymore problems.
 
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