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Hey guys, I've been sneaking around the forum ever since I bought my Tundra ('07 double cab, currently all stock except the shifter knob:p), but have mostly managed to avoid making any repeat posts and have pretty much found answers to all the questions I've had. That being said, I've been looking through the forums and the net and haven't seen anything relating to a DIY brakechange for the tundra. As far as mechanical skills go, I'm pretty average joe... and I'd like to save a couple bucks on a break change and have some satisfaction of learning to do it myself. If I've ever run into trouble I call my mechanical engineer buddy from MIT:tu: and he fixes the issue. So ideally, he will be helping me with the whole change, and claims he doesn't need a DIY guide and that we'll "figure it out", and I have every confidence in him. But he flys back out to MIT on Sunday(2 days away) night, and I'll be staying here in San Diego. So in case we aren't able to get to it, I'd like to have some kind of DIY reference handy.

Thanks for any help guys!

P.S. I didn't bother looking in the owners manual or the included reference text, because it didn't even describe a basic oil change, so I assume it wouldn't have a brake change.
 

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disc brakes are pretty simple.

-pull off wheels
-should be 2 bolts holding on caliper from backside, remove them, and hang the caliper with a piece of wire from your springs
-use a c-clamp to push the pistons back in, if you cant do it by hand
-remove old pads.
-install new pads
-remove and replace rotor
-re-install caliper
-pump brakes

do this one wheel at a time, and you wont have to worry about removing or adding any brake fluid.

-re-install wheels, and youre done.
 

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disc brakes are pretty simple.

-pull off wheels
-should be 2 bolts holding on caliper from backside, remove them, and hang the caliper with a piece of wire from your springs
-use a c-clamp to push the pistons back in, if you cant do it by hand
-remove old pads.
-install new pads
-remove and replace rotor
-re-install caliper
-pump brakes

do this one wheel at a time, and you wont have to worry about removing or adding any brake fluid.

-re-install wheels, and youre done.
Pretty much sums it up :tu:
 

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I rotated my tires myself the other week-end & noticed the rear brake's are basic just like the other 100 or so I've done over the years, but the front brake's are a little different than you average brake job. Not saying I couldn't or wouldn't do them, but they looked like they had some clip or somethan on the top, anyone done them and know what I'm talking about?
 

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When pushing the caliper back in, open the bleeder to avoid pushing old brake fluid past the master cyl cups and back into the reservoir. Any GM tech will tell you this is a HUGE no no on GM stuff. Good way to kill a master cylinder.
The brake lines from the caliper to the spindle are steel. You'll need to detach the bracket in order to move the caliper without kinking the steel line.
 

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Hey, I just noticed that you live in Carlsbad. I'm in Vista. I could come by if you need a hand.

And...if you don't have brake vibration or excessive wear on the rotors, there's no reason to replace them. The spec is on the rotor if they need to be machined. If they have no lip indicating excessive wear, no vibration (warpage or unparallel surfaces) I see no reason to do anything to them. I would use Raybestos premium ceramic pads.
 

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Yep, that's another thang I noticed, steel brake lines to the caliber in the the front, not a brake hose like in the back or on most trucks and cars I've worked on. Forget pulling caliber pens and hanging calibers on old coat hanger, this is a different animal your working on.
 

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I rotated my tires myself the other week-end & noticed the rear brake's are basic just like the other 100 or so I've done over the years, but the front brake's are a little different than you average brake job. Not saying I couldn't or wouldn't do them, but they looked like they had some clip or somethan on the top, anyone done them and know what I'm talking about?
Should just be the anti rattle clip, I haven't looked at mine but if they are like the fronts on my 95 hilux (and most imports) they are "floating pads". Most of the time you can slide the pads out after removing the clip and then the pins they slide on, then all you have to do is push the pistons back so that the new pads go back in.
 

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Great forum amazin what you can learn, I've pushed the caliber back without cracking the bleeder my whole life, wont do it anymore, Figured that was a anti rattle clip or somethan thanks for the info points sent on last 2 posts.
 

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socal57chevy....you could become famous on this forum if you wrote a good DIY step by step brake job complete with photos! I have done a few in my life, but have never heard of opening the bleeder before pushing in the piston, but that makes good sense to me. I am sure you must have a few more good pointers that you could share.

Fundra07...how about a full report after you complete your brake job? Like problems encountered, things not to do, etc. My pads are about 1/2 gone, so I will be doing a brake job soon.
 

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I found a link to generic PDF brake install instructions for anybody to save...
http://www.monroeheavyduty.com/catalog/docs/MHD_InstallationTips.pdf

On older cars (mid 80s and older) it was fine to push fluid back as the systems were far simpler and less affected by debris and reverse pressure.

The brake fluid at the caliper has seen the most heat and is the most likely place for air bubbles to form from the heat. It's a good idea to get rid of this fluid regardless of the year model of the car. Install a clear hose on the nipple of the bleeder and place the other end in a small container with clean brake fluid. This eliminates the possibility of sucking in air should you inadvertently allow the caliper to extend while the bleeder is open.
 

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socal57chevy....you could become famous on this forum if you wrote a good DIY step by step brake job complete with photos! I have done a few in my life, but have never heard of opening the bleeder before pushing in the piston, but that makes good sense to me. I am sure you must have a few more good pointers that you could share.
Thanks. I"m just tryin to help. I wonder if my boss would be upset if I photographed or videotaped our next Tundra brake job? I don't see him beeing too thrilled about it. Maybe I could take a few pics of mine and explain the steps without actually doing it. I only have about 8K on my rig. (had it almost 3 months, I think...or is it 2 months?)
 

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57chevy you made some good sense with your post, I've only 5,000 om my rig, but good info will make the job better and easier, I'm not hurting anyone's business cause I alway's do my own brake jobs anyway, & a bunch of my family's and wife's family's and a few co-workers brake jobs. Alway's have. Never put the hose on the nipple of the bleeder, but have seen the bleeder kits at the auto store before. Now I see why this may be a good idea.
 

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you'll want to get the rotors turned, do the job right.

As for the bleeder screw it always amazes me that people don't know to do that. Main reason isn't the master cylinder, it's damage that can be done to the abs module. Flushing your brake fluid isn't a bad idea, several reasons, it's corrosive and has an inhibitor agent in it, over time the inhibitor breaks down and the fluid eats the copper in the break lines. Also the fluid is hygroscopic (meaning it absorbs water) the more water in the lines reduces the boiling point. And boys and girls we all know you can't really compress a liquid (basic concept for hydraulic brakes), once it boils it turns into a gas and you can compress a gas thus resulting in your pedal needing to be depressed further or not stopping the vehicle in an acceptable distance. Lastly the water will become corrosive and damage the abs module.
 

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Recent articles in Motor Magazine MOTOR Magazine | MOTOR Information Systems suggest that machining every rotor "just because" is not necessary. If the rotor is true and shows no abnormal wear characteristics there really isn't any reason to make it thinner. The thinner it is, the less resistant to heat it becomes. These trucks already seem to have a problem with rotors and I think machining them without cause will lead to premature failure. Our shop gets Motor Magazine subscription as part of some other data source we subscribe to. Not trying to be argumentative, just want to make sure we have good info. The rest of your post was spot on.

**edit** I found one of the articles that mentions GM advising against automatically machining brake rotors during a brake job...
http://www.motor.com/article.asp?article_ID=1167

"Rotors on today's vehicles are thinner and lighter than those on older vehicles. The first time a rotor is turned may be the last time before it must be replaced. Some vehicle manufacturers argue against automatic rotor resurfacing. In a service bulletin, GM says resurfacing is “ineffective at correcting brake squeal and/or premature lining wear and should not be used to address these conditions—unless specifically directed to do so in a service bulletin.”

If GM discourages rotor resurfacing during pad replacement, when is this procedure appropriate? Every vehicle is different, which is why each rotor must be carefully inspected to determine the appropriate course of action
."
 

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GM certainly isn't at the forefront of much of anything, however it says should be carefully inspected, look at all the people who don't even know the basics (bleeder screw) and they are to carefully inspect it. How many people will look on the inboard side with a flashlight, how many people have a micrometer or a dial indicator in their garage to determine lateral runout. One cut rotors are fine, figure you get 40-50k out of the pads, multiply by 2 and I don't think buying rotors ever 80k miles it too much to ask. Pad slapping is typically considered a shade tree quality brake job.
One thing that chevy does well is their truck pads, they'll go 100k miles, they're expensive 150-200 bucks ouch.
As for heat, what's even worse than taking 3,000ths off are the smart guys that put ceramic pads on. For those that don't know, ceramic doesn't transfer heat well. Typical heat transfer goes from rotors to pads and then finally to calipers, the ceramic pads drasically reduces heat transfer and keeps the rotors hotter and longer.
Look forward to some pics, it's a pita to post a pic on my iPhone
 

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Now if I have time, I go brake bleeding crazy, and this has probably saved me a lot of problems over time. Now machining rotars can be a real problem for the diy'er. First you gota drop the rotars off, hope the parts store has the time to do the job. Now ya pro's are about to gasp but if my rotors are only slightly grooved well the pipefitter in me comes out. Out comes the grinder with a tiger disc & I just clean it up. Kinda natural since I do this at work on pipe so often it's just what I do. Learned from an ol pipefitter when I was young and now 30 years later I'm still doing the same & with good results over the years. Would I put the tiger disc on my new tundra, naw would I do it 80,000 miles from now he!! yea 300 400$ brake job ya gotta be crazy.
 

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Now if I have time, I go brake bleeding crazy, and this has probably saved me a lot of problems over time. Now machining rotars can be a real problem for the diy'er. First you gota drop the rotars off, hope the parts store has the time to do the job. Now ya pro's are about to gasp but if my rotors are only slightly grooved well the pipefitter in me comes out. Out comes the grinder with a tiger disc & I just clean it up. Kinda natural since I do this at work on pipe so often it's just what I do. Learned from an ol pipefitter when I was young and now 30 years later I'm still doing the same & with good results over the years. Would I put the tiger disc on my new tundra, naw would I do it 80,000 miles from now he!! yea 300 400$ brake job ya gotta be crazy.
I'm with ya brother!!
 
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