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There are several threads with different how to's in them. I've made this thread sticky with links to the free how to threads:tu:

Add DRL's

Black Headlight Mod

Toytec Lift Install

Locker Mod

Fog Light Mod

Silence Door Buzzer

Install Elock for tonneaus and toppers

How to Light 4x4 Selector Switch

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/tacoma/170507-diy-washable-cabin-air-filter/

Enjoy, and there are more member documented mods in the Member Modifications, Installations and How to thread. You have to be a subscriber to access that forum, so consider becoming a subscriber for all the benefits.
 

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05+ trouble codes

P0100
Mass or volume sensor or circuit

Possible Problems
MAF may be disconnected, or a wiring connection may be bad. MAF sensor may be faulty.

Reset the code and see if it comes back.
Verify that the Mass Air Flow Sensor wiring is connected properly and that there are no broken /frayed wires.
Unplug and reconnect the MAF wiring harness
Check the voltage of the MAF sensor (refer to a repair manual for vehicle specific information)
Replace the MAF sensor

P0101
Mass or volume Circuit Range/Performance Problem

Possible Problems
Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor or circuit. The PCM detects that the actual MAF sensor frequency signal is not within a predetermined range of the calculated MAF value for more than 4.0 seconds.

Reset the code and see if it comes back
Inspect for the following conditions:
An incorrectly routed harness--Inspect the harness of the MAF sensor in order to verify that it is not routed too close to the following components:
- The secondary ignition wires or coils
- Any solenoids
- Any relays
- Any motors
A low minimum air rate through the sensor bore may cause this DTC to set at idle or during deceleration. Inspect for any vacuum leaks downstream of the MAF sensor.
A wide open throttle (WOT) acceleration from a stop should cause the MAF sensor g/s display on the scan tool to increase rapidly. This increase should be from 6-12 g/s at idle to 230 g/s or more at the time of the 1-2 shift. If the increase is not observed, inspect for a restriction in the induction system or the exhaust system.
The barometric pressure (BARO) that is used in order to calculate the predicted MAF value is initially based on the MAP sensor at key ON.
When the engine is running the MAP sensor value is continually updated near WOT. A skewed MAP sensor will cause the calculated MAF value to be inaccurate. The value shown for the MAP sensor display varies with the altitude. With the ignition ON and the engine OFF, 103 kPa is the approximate value near sea level. This value will decrease by approximately 3 kPa for every 305 meters (1,000 feet) of altitude.
A high resistance on the ground circuit of the MAP sensor can cause this DTC to set.
Any loss of vacuum to the MAP sensor can cause this DTC to set.

P0102
Mass or volume Circuit Low Input
Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor or circuit. MAF circuit had lower than expected voltage (air flow).

Possible Problems
The MAF may be disconnected, or a wiring connection may be bad
The MAF may be dirty or otherwise contaminated (if you use an oiled air filter such as a K&N air filter, some of the oil may have made it's way onto the MAF sensor).
The MAF sensor may be faulty
The vehicle computer may be faulty (very rare)

reset the code and see if it comes back.
Verify that the Mass Air Flow Sensor wiring is connected properly and that there are no broken / frayed wires.
Inspect for any air leaks near the MAF sensor.
Take the MAF out and clean it using a spray cleaner such as brake cleaner or electrical contact cleaner. Be gentle with the sensor.
Check the voltage of the MAF sensor (refer to a repair manual for vehicle specific information)
Replace the MAF sensor.

P0103
Mass or Volume Circuit High Input.

Possible Problems
Mass Air Flow High (MAF) sensor or circuit. MAF circuit had higher than expected voltage (air flow).

The MAF may be disconnected, or a wiring connection may be bad
The MAF sensor may be damaged
The vehicle computer may be faulty (very rare)
reset the code and see if it comes back.
Verify that the Mass Air Flow Sensor wiring is connected properly and that there are no broken / frayed wires.
Inspect for any air leaks near the MAF sensor.
Take the MAF out and clean it using a spray cleaner such as brake cleaner or electrical contact cleaner. Be gentle with the sensor.
Check the voltage of the MAF sensor (refer to a repair manual for vehicle specific information)
Replace the MAF sensor.

P0104
Mass or Volume Circuit Intermittent

Possible Problems
Mass Air Flow High (MAF) sensor or circuit. MAF is producing incorrect air flow readings.

The mass air flow (MAF) circuit is incomplete (broken/frayed wire, etc.)
There is an air leak in the intake system

Reset the code and see if it comes back.
Verify that the Mass Air Flow Sensor wiring is connected properly and that there are no broken / frayed wires.
Inspect for any air leaks near the MAF sensor.
Check the voltage of the MAF sensor (refer to a repair manual for vehicle specific information)
Replace the MAF sensor.

P0105
The description of the expected voltages for the MAP sensor output (backprobing Terminal 2) in the Haynes manual is incorrect. The voltages listed are not the expected voltages, they are the voltage drops expected from the reference voltage.

With the MAP connector attached and the ignition on and the vacuum line disconnected, measure the reference voltage by backprobing terminals 2 and 1. Measure the voltages at these same connectors while applying different vacuums at the port. If your reference voltage without vacuum is 3 volts (for example), then you should see the following voltages at these vacuums:

3.94 in Hg 2.5-2.7 V [3.0 V (reference voltage) minus 0.5-0.3 V]
7.87 in Hg 2.1-2.3 V (3.0 minus 0.9-0.7 V)
11.81 in Hg 1.7-1.9 V (3.0 minus 1.3-1.1 V)
15.75 in Hg 1.3-1.5 V (3.0 minus 1.7-1.5 V)
19.69 in Hg 0.9-1.1 V (3.0 minus 2.1-1.9 V)

Although your MAP may not exactly match what is listed above, the trend should be the same. I don't think there is anything magical about these absolute numbers, it is having a smooth trend that is important. There is bound to be some variation.

P0123
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit High Input

Possible Problems
Computer has detected that the TPS (throttle position sensor) is reporting too high a voltage.
Symptoms may include: Rough idle, High idle, Surging, or other symptoms may also be present

TPS not mounted securely
TPS circuit short to ground or another wire
Faulty TPS
Damaged computer (PCM)

If there are no symptoms, the simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back.
If engine is stumbling or hesitating, carefully inspect all wiring and connectors that lead to the TPS. More than likely the problem is with the TPS wiring.
Check the voltage at the TPS (refer to a service manual for your vehicle for this specific information). If the voltage spikes or is too high (over 4.65 volts with key on, engine off), then that is indicative of a problem.
Carefully trace each wire from the TPS wiring harness to check for breaks, rubbing against other components, etc.

P0125
Insufficient Coolant Temperature for Closed Loop Fuel Control

Possible Problems
After the engine is warmed up, oxygen sensor output does not indicated RICH even once when conditions warrant and continue for at least 1.5 min.
Conditions: Engine speed 1,500 rpm or more, and speed 25-62 mph and throttle valve not completely closed.

Open or short in HO2 sensor circuit or oxygen sensor

or

Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor indicates that the engine has not reached the required temperature level to enter closed-loop operation within a specified amount of time after starting the engine.

Insufficient warm up time
Low engine coolant level
Leaking or stuck open thermostat
Faulty coolant temperature sensor

P0132
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank 1 Sensor 1)

Possible Problems
Front oxygen sensor on the driver's side reading is too high.

The oxygen sensor heater circuit is shorted out
The wiring to the sensor is broken / frayed (less likely)

Replace Front driver's side front oxygen sensor. <= Most likely

Other possibilities
Check for wiring problems (shorted, frayed wires)
Check the voltage of the oxygen sensor

P0133
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response (Bank 1 Sensor 1)

Possible Problems
Front oxygen sensor on the driver's side voltage output is slower than 1 second rich to lean or lean to rich during idling after engine is warmed up (2 trip detection logic).

Bad HO2 sensor<= Most likely
Check and fix any exhaust leaks
Check for wiring problems (shorted, frayed wires)
Check the frequency and amplitude of the oxygen sensor (advanced)
Check for a deteriorating / contaminated oxygen sensor, replace if necessary
Check for inlet air leaks
Check the MAF sensor for proper operation
See also P0125 above.

P0139
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response (Bank 1 Sensor 2)

Possible Problems
Rear oxygen sensor on the driver's side or the ECM does not adjust the air fuel ratio as expected to do so, or not adjusted as often as expected to do so once the engine is warmed or under normal engine use.

Faulty oxygen sensor
The wiring to the sensor is broken/frayed
There is an exhaust leak

Faulty HO2 Sensor 2 <= Most likely
Check and fix any exhaust leaks
Check for wiring problems (shorted, frayed wires)
Check the frequency and amplitude of the oxygen sensor (advanced)
Check for a deteriorating / contaminated oxygen sensor, replace if necessary
Check for inlet air leaks
Check the MAF sensor for proper operation

P0153
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response (Bank 2 Sensor 1)

Possible Problems
Front oxygen sensor on the passenger's side voltage output is slower than 1 second rich to lean or lean to rich during idling after engine is warmed up (2 trip detection logic).

Bad HO2 sensor<= Most likely
Check and fix any exhaust leaks
Check for wiring problems (shorted, frayed wires)
Check the frequency and amplitude of the oxygen sensor (advanced)
Check for a deteriorating / contaminated oxygen sensor, replace if necessary
Check for inlet air leaks
Check the MAF sensor for proper operation
See also P0125 above.

P0159
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response (Bank 2 Sensor 2)

Possible Problems
Rear oxygen sensor on the passenger side or the ECM is not adjusting the air fuel ratio as expected to do so, or not adjusted as often as expected to do so once the engine is warmed or under normal engine use.

Faulty oxygen sensor
Wiring to the sensor is broken/frayed
Exhaust leak

Replace rear passenger side oxygen sensor.
Check and fix any exhaust leaks
Check for wiring problems (shorted, frayed wires)
Check the frequency and amplitude of the oxygen sensor (advanced)
Check for a deteriorating/contaminated oxygen sensor, replace if necessary
Check for inlet air leaks
Check the MAF sensor for proper operation
See also P0125 above.

P0171
System too Lean (Bank 1)

Possible Problems
When the air fuel ratio feedback is stable after engine warming up, the fuel trim is considerably in error on the LEAN side (2 trip detection logic)

Air intake hose loose
Fuel line pressure low (may be from running out of gas)
Injector blockage
HO2 sensor malfuction
MAF meter malfunction
Engine coolant temperature sensor malfunction

Clean MAF meter with electronic circuit cleaner<= most likely
Fix vacuum/intake leak downstream of MAF meter
Inspect fuel lines for cracks, leaks, or pinches
Replace fuel filter
Check fuel pressure at the fuel rail
Check output of HO2 sensor
Check injector performance
Check ECT sensor

P0172
System too Rich (Bank 1)

Possible Problems
When the air fuel ratio feedback is stable after engine warming up, the fuel trim is considerably in error on the RICH side (2 trip detection logic)

Fuel line pressure high
Injector leak
HO2 sensor malfuction
MAF meter malfunction
Engine coolant temperature sensor malfunction

Clean MAF meter with electronic circuit cleaner<= most likely
Inspect all vacuum and PCV hoses, replace if necessary
Inspect fuel lines for cracks, leaks, or pinches
Check fuel pressure at the fuel rail
Check output of HO2 sensor
Check injector performance
Check ECT sensor
Check for adequate spark and ignition

P0174
System too Lean (Bank 2)
See P0171 for Bank 1

P0175
System too Rich (Bank 2)
See P0172 for Bank 1

P0325
No knock sensor 1 signal to ECM with engine speed 2,000 rpm or more.

Possible Problems
Open or short in knock sensor 1 circuit <= Most likely problem. Check sensor connector for good connection and check wire for damage. Wire is easily damaged when head is removed or similar repair work has been accomplished. Sensor can be tested with ohmmeter. There should be no continuity between the sensor terminal and the sensor body. Replace if there is continuity.
Knock sensor 1 loosness - tighten sensor
ECM

P0330
No knock sensor 2 signal to ECM with engine speed 2,000 rpm or more.

Possible Problems
Open or short in knock sensor 2 circuit <= Most likely problem.Check sensor connector for good connection and check wire for damage. Wire is easily damaged when head is removed or similar repair work has been accomplished. Sensor can be tested with ohmmeter. There should be no continuity between the sensor terminal and the sensor body. Replace if there is continuity.
Knock sensor 2 loosness - tighten sensor
ECM

P0401
After the engine is warmed up, the intake manifold absolute pressure is larger than the value calculated by the ECM while the EGR system is ON (2 trip detection logic).

Possible Problems
EGR valve stuck closed <= Most common Clean EGR valve
EGR Vacuum Switching Valve (VSV)
Open or short in VSV circuit for EGR
EGR valve position sensor open or short circuit
Vacuum or EGR hose disconnected
EGR valve position sensor
Manifold absolute pressure sensor malfunction <=See P0105 above for testing MAP sensor
ECM

P0402
After the engine is warmed up, conditions (a) and (b) continue.

(a) The intake manifold absolute pressure is larger than the value calculated by the ECM while the EGR system is ON.

(b) Misfiring is detected during idling (2 trip detection logic).

Possible Problems
EGR valve stuck open <= Most common Clean EGR valve
Vacuum or EGR hose is connected to wrong post
Manifold absolute pressure sensor malfunction
ECM

P0440
The fuel tank pressure is atmospheric pressure after the vehicle is driven for 20 min (2 trip detection logic).


TSB for 5S-FE
EG013-02 '98 and '99 Camry and Solara






"Under certain driving conditions, some 1998 - 1999 model year Camry and Solara vehicles may exhibit a M.I.L. "ON" with DTCs P0440, P0441 and P0446 stored due to an inoperative Vapor Pressure Sensor







3 way Vacuum Switching Valve (VSV). An improved Vapor Pressure Sensor VSV has been developed to correct this condition."

TSB for 5S-FE 1998






EG003-98

Repair Procedure

A. Diagnostics for PO441:

1. Remove Vacuum Hoses between EVAP VSV
and Charcoal Canister and discard.



2. If there is a metal vapor pipe between


EVAP VSV and Charcoal Canister, clean inside of vaporpipe
3. Replace
EVAP VSV and Charcoal Canister assembly with new parts.
4. Install new vacuum hoses between
EVAP VSV and Charcoal Canister.
B. Diagnostics for P0446:
1. Inspect vacuum hoses and pipes between
EVAP (Purge) VSV and Charcoal Canister for leaks.
2. Replace Vapor Pressure VSV and Canister.
NOTE :When performing diagnostics for an occurrence of a
MIL "ON" condition, Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0441 may be result of debris in Evaporative Emission Control System. This may cause blockage of a vapor line, or a stuck VSV, as described in troubleshooting area of Repair Manual.


Possible Problems
Fuel tank cap incorrectly installed <= Most common
Fuel tank cap cracked or damaged (Toyota part only)
Bad vapor pressure sensor/circuit
Vacuum hose cracked, holed, blocked, damaged or disconnected
Hose or tube cracked, holed, damaged, or loose
Fuel tank/filler neck cracked, holed, or damaged
Charcoal canister cracked, holed, or damaged (collision)

In above description, check hoses between vapor pressur sensor and VSV for vapor pressure sensor and charcoal canister. Also, hose between charcoal canister and fuel tank.

P0441 and/or P0446
Possible Problems
Open or short in VSV circuit for vapor pressure sensor
VSV for vapor pressure sensor
Open or short in vapor pressure sensor circuit
Vapor pressure sensor
Open or short in VSV circuit for EVAP
VSV for EVAP
Vacuum hose cracks, hole, blocked, damaged or disconnected
Charcoal canister cracks, hole, or damaged

(P0446 is not normally associated with a loose or non-sealing gas cap. A loose or non-sealing gas cap triggers P0440)

1. Check the VSV connector for EVAP, VSV connector for vapor pressure sensor and vapor pressure sensor connector for looseness and disconnection

2. Check the vacuum hose between intake manifold and VSV for EVAP, VSV for EVAP and charcoal canister, charcoal canister and VSV for vapor pressure sensor, and VSV for vapor pressure sensor and vapor pressure sensor. Check these hoses for correct connection, looseness, cracks, holes, damage, and blockage.

3. Check voltage between terminals VC and E2 of ECM connector (4.5-5.5 V). (replace ECM if faulty)

4. Check voltages between terminals PTNK and E2 of ECM connector while applying vacuum to vapor pressure sensor (2.9-3.7 V).

If faulty, check for open and short in harness and connector between vapor pressure sensor and ECM. If ok at this point, replace vapor pressure sensor.

If voltage above is ok, Check VSV for EVAP. When ECM terminal EVP is grounded (ignition "ON"), Air should flow in pipe E (inboard on tube) on VSV and out F (outboard on tube) on VSV (Don't use high pressure air for this test). When EVP is not grounded, air does not flow in E and out F.

5. Check operation of VSV for EVAP. Remove VSV from engine. Check that there is continuity between the two terminals (30-34 ohms). If there is no continuity, replace VSV for EVAP.

Check that there is no continuity between either terminal and body. If there is continuity, replace VSV for EVAP.

Check that air does not flow from inner port (E) to outboard port (F).

Check that air flows from port E to F when you apply battery voltage across terminals. If no air flows, replace VSV for EVAP.

6. Check the vacuum hose between intake manifold and VSV for EVAP, and VSV for EVAP and charcoal canister. Check as above.

7. Check for open or short in harness and connector between EFI main-relay and VSV for EVAP and ECM. If faulty, repair or replace harness or connector. If ok, check and replace ECM.

8. Check VSV for vapor pressure sensor. When ECM terminal TPC is grounded (ignition "ON"), Air should flow in pipe E (inboard on tube) on VSV and out F (outboard on tube) on VSV. When TPC is not grounded, air flows out G (outside of connector).

If ok, check and replace charcoal canister.

If not functioning correctly, check function of VSV for vapor pressure sensor. Remove from engine.
Check that there is continuity between the terminals (33-39 ohms). Replace the VSV if there is no continuity.

Check that air flows from port E (inboard in tube) to port G (side of connector).

Check that air flows from port E to port F (outboard in tube) when battery voltage is applied across terminals. Replace VSV if function is incorrect.

9. If good, Check the vacuum hose between charcoal canister and VSV for vapor pressure sensor, and vapor pressure sensor and VSV for vapor pressure sensor - check as above.

11. Check for open and short in harness and connector between EFI main replay and VSV for vapor pressure sensor and ECM.

P0770 Shift Solenoid E Malfunction

Solenoid E (SL) is the torque converter lock-up solenoid. If the torque converter is a little slow locking up, it will set this code. May only be a one-time thing owing to a small particle of something getting jammed in the solenoid. The code may disappear by itself.

If it doesn't right away, check out the color of your tranny fluid. If it is pretty much red or brown and smells ok, then flush the tranny and see if that gets rid of the code. If not, pull out some fluid and add a bottle of Seafoam Trans Tune and run it for 1 or 2k miles. Then flush the transmission again. Check if the code is gone.

If this problem persists, I've been told you'll have to replace the E-solenoid.

There is a Service Bulleting (EG006-00) issued for '00 Siennas on this problem. They get a new torque converter to fix the problem permanently.

The following discussion was submitted by csaxon:

The ECM uses signals from throttle position sensor, airflow meter and crankshaft position sensor to monitor engagement of Torque Converter Clutch (TCC).

The ECM compares engagement condition of TCC with lock-up schedule in memory to detect MECHANICAL trouble of lock-up solenoid, valve body and torque converter. A P0700 trouble code is set when TCC lock-up does not occur during appropriate speed, or lock-up does not release at appropriate speed.

Possible causes are:
* Solenoid is stuck open or closed.
* Valve body clogged or valve stuck.
* TCC malfunction.

There are simple electrical tests to check the solenoid and plunger but the transmission pan must be removed to gain access.

As Brian suggests, if you haven't had your system flushed or changed in awhile it may help but I'm not sure that's cheaper than actually removing the pan and checking the solenoid.

The Toyota service tech can check the system without pan removal with his analyzer.
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