Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, I finally got around to fixing my broken column shifter on my tilt steering column after procrastinating for the last 8 months....lol. Unfortunately, I can't show a great deal of pics since my camera's batteries died after the 3rd or 4th shot, so I had to take post pics and describe the process.

Here's a link to the original issue:
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1gen-tundra/220838-help-shifter-assembly-mount-broken/

In order to repair the shifter if you have a broken support bracket and shifter baseplate, you'll need the following parts and tools:

Parts:
OEM support bracket: part # 45859-07010
OEM shaft assembly: part # 33501-0C011
Optional parts (does not include the 3 screws for mounting the shaft to the support bracket - mine were good):
OEM tilt steering pivot pins/bolts (2 total): part #45856-07010
OEM torx lobular screws for mounting support bracket (4 total): part #90080-10048
OEM screw to hold column shifter arm into shaft (1 total): part #90080-16070

Tools:
10mm socket: 3/8" or 1/2" drive (remove lower kick panel under dash)
12mm socket; 3/8" or 1/2" drive (remove lower portion of steering shaft from shaft to steering rack)
14mm deep socket; 3/8" or 1/2" drive (remove 4 bolts hold steering column to dash)
19mm socket; 3/8" or 1/2" drive (remove center nut holding steering wheel to shaft)
1/2" or 3/8" drive 4-6" extension (for 19mm socket)
1/2" drive socket wrench or extended 3/8" drive socket wrench (for 19mm socket)
E-8 torx socket (removing torx lobular screws holding support to lower steering column)
3/8" drive socket wrench (if not already obtained - still needed for torx lobular bolt removal and possibly for 12mm and 14mm sockets)
1/4" to 3/8" adapter (for converting to 3/8" socket wrench when removing torx lobular bolts in support bracket)
3/8" drive socket extension of 4-6" (if not already obtained - for attachment between adapter above and 3/8" drive socket wrench
1/4" drive socket wrench (for removing most torx bolts)
1/4" socket for 1/8" socket wrench (hold 3 separate torx bits)
1/4" drive socket extension of 3" for 1/4" socket wrench (used for torx bit when removing air bag)
T-20 torx bit or screwdriver (removing parking cable lock)
T-25 torx bit or screwdriver (removing baseplate under spiral cable)
T-30 torx bit (removing airbag and column shifter shaft baseplate)
Flat head screwdriver - small (remove torx screw covers)
Slide hammer with, I believe 8-32 or M4-0.7 inch screw thread (can use 1/2"-3/4" M4-0.7 screws, pry bar and hammer in lieu of slide hammer)
Metric steering wheel remover (can be borrowed from AutoZone for $20 deposit)
Punch pin small enough to fit in pivot pin hole
Hammer

Here's a picture of one of the tool combinations (1/4" drive socket wrench w/without extension, 1/4" socket and torx bit for removing airbag & column shifter shaft). It includes the E-8 torx socket which can be purchased at Advanced Auto.

Picture 1:


Picture 2:


Typical slide hammer; I don't have a picture of the 15 year old one I used:

Picture 3:


Step 1: Turn on truck and turn wheel 90 degrees to both right and left to expose screws for top and lower cover removal; remove these screws.
Step 2: Center wheels as best as possible for easy alignment marking of assemblies (in later steps), and then turn off truck and put emergency brake on.
Step 3: DISCONNECT BATTERY NEGATIVE TERMINAL AND WAIT TWO MINUTES BEFORE WORKING ON AIRBAG ASSEMBLY!!!
Step 4: Remove visible screw underneath lower cover for remove bottom cover.
Step 5: Spray PAM (cooking grease) on column shifter and slowly work top cover off steering column arm after separation.
Step 6: Remove lower kick panel under dash using socket wrench with 10mm socket (not shown)
Step 7: Remove black air duct running under steering column (slip out left side and pull out right - very easy)
Step 8: Remove the airbag by prying off the plastic caps on each side of the steering wheel for access and use a T-30 torx bit on the socket wrench/extension/torx bit tool shown above.

Picture 4:


Step 9: Remove airbag and disconnect the electrical connectors (yellow and grounding wire for airbag; white for spiral assembly):

Picture 5:


Step 10: Mark end of steering shaft and steering wheel to align with one another before pulling steering wheel
Step 11: Loosen nut with 19mm 6pt socket, 4-6" extension and 1/2" socket wrench; have someone hold steering wheel for counterforce
Step 12: Remove steering wheel with steering wheel remover; you should hear a loud snap when it pops off the steering shaft
Step 9: Remove the black and yellow connectors from the bottom of the spiral assembly in the picture below:

Picture 6:


Step 13: Insure sprial cable marks align (bottom right hand side of front) and remove 4 screws holding assembly with medium size phillips screwdriver
Picture of black spiral assembly with blinker/cruise control assembly underneath in white:

Picture 7:


Step 14: Remove white connector on blinker/cruise control assembly shown in picture 6 on left hand side
Step 12: Remove black connector on blinker/cruise control assembly shown in picture below from underneath

Picture 8:


Step 15: Remove blinker/cruise control assembly in white using a large phillips screwdriver with two screws on top and one underneath
Step 16: Remove spring holding tilt to baseplate underneath and two T-25 torx screws holding baseplate to steering column

Picture 9:


Step 17: Disconnect the overdrive connector shown in picture 6 & 8 (small white connector) from the column shifter
Step 18: Remove the two T-20 torx screws holding the shift lock cable to the column shifter shaft as shown in the picture 10 from the backside:

Picture 10:


Step 19: Remove transmission shifter in below picture by prying off the shifter assembly (see pictures 10 & 17) and the pinching the holder (picture 11) on the left & right of where it connects to the steering column (picture 11) and pulling it back. The large and small adjacent white electrical connectors should be removed as well as shown in picture 11 below:

Picture 11:


Step 20: Mark the steering shaft to the bottom of the where it connect to the shaft going to the steering rack on the floor of the cab (see picture 12):
Step 21: Remove the screw with a 12mm socket (see picture 12):

Picture 12:


Step 22: Mark the relation of the shaft to the column assembly for easy removal and insert of the shaft in later steps (see picture 13):

Picture 13:


NOTE: IF YOU INTEND TO USE A PRY BAR TO REMOVE THE PIVOT PIN/BOLTS, SKIP TO STEP 26....

Step 23: Remove black spring holding brake to column assembly (see picture 14):

Picture 14:


Step 24: Disconnect (4) 14mm bolts holding steering column assembly to underside of dash, lowering it off the bolts and sliding it out of the shaft going to the steering rack (see pictures 15 & 16 of bolts and picture 12 for reference):

Picture 15:


Picture 16:


Step 25: Remove entire steering column from truck and place on bench.

Step 26: Remove the column shift arm using medium size phillips screwdriver. If stuck, apply propane torch back and forth over screw for 10 seconds making sure adjacent wire doesn't start to melt and remove screw.
Step 27: Remove the rocker shift arm with a 10mm socket wrench as shown in the picture below (picture is with assembly still mounted in vehicle).
Step 28: Remove the (3) T-30 torx screws holding column shaft to the support bracket (one is missing from the picture 17 since it broke off; see picture 18 for reference as well).

Picture 17:


Step 29: Punch back any soft aluminum covering the pivot pins/bolts which keep it from sliding out over time using a punch pin or screwdriver as I did.
Step 30: Remove the tilt pivot pins/bolts using the slide hammer (picture 3) with either an M4-0.7 or 8-32 screw (still need to determine which one I actually used as both seem to fit the screw hole). If using pry bar, screw in an M4-0.7 stainless steel screw as much as possible (at least a 1/4" deep) and pry off using a pry bar. I chose to to use the slide hammer as called for in the repair manual as I wasn't sure how much force was needed and didn't want to take a chance on breaking off the head of the inserted bolt, but it actually came out quite easily.
Step 31: Insert key into ignition and turn to ACC position.
Step 32: Slowly pull steering shaft with tube (upper tilt housing) from the column housing assembly. Rotate if necessary. It should pull out straight if the lines are marked on the housing and steering shaft line up.
Step 31: Remove the (4) torx lobular bolts using the E-8 socket, 1/4" to 3/8" adapter, 4-6" extension and 3/8" drive socket wrench (if stuck tight, use propane torch on backside of each bolt for 10 seconds before wrenching off - loctite on most screws)
Step 32: Replace with new support bracket and new or old screws (if reusable).
Step 33: Use punch pin to tap in new pivot pins/bolts and punch soft aluminum in 3 spots to cover pins as shown on old bracket to keep from backing out over time.
Step 34: Reassemble most of the entire assembly, aligning the markers when re-inserting the steering shaft into the column assembly and the shaft going to the steering column.
Step 35: Stop at the point of tightening the 19mm bolt on steering wheel, but with airbag electrically attached and resting loosely in steering wheel.
Step 36: Re-inspect all electrical connections and re-connect negative terminal of battery.
Step 37: Turn on ignition (from passenger seat if you want to be extra safe) and insure most electrical connections are working (i.e. turn signals, blinkers, head lights, brake lights, fog lights, dash panel lights, etc.)
Step 38: Release emergency brake, put truck in gear, back up, go forward and then park. Remove key.
Step 39: DISCONNECT BATTERY NEGATIVE TERMINAL AND WAIT TWO MINUTES BEFORE WORKING ON AIRBAG ASSEMBLY!!!
Step 40: Disconnect airbag, and tighten down steering wheel insuring prior markings line up.
Step 41: Reassemble electrical connections to airbag, tighten T-30 torx screws to hold airbag assembly and place plastic covers over screw holes.
Step 42: Reassemble top and bottom cover to steering column to complete work. See picture 18 of final assembly prior to covers being re-attached:

Picture 18:


Picture 19:


Feel free to provide me with info on any missing/incorrect steps if you see one. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,745 Posts
Very detailed write up. I'm sure I will be needing to do this in the not so distant future, so thanks in advance!

/Mike
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
222 Posts
Thank you for the detailed how to's. I am fixing my wife's Sequoia now using this as direction. Anyone knows if Toyota has improved the bracket? I wonder if I install this, it is going to break again. It is such a pain to fix this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for the detailed how to's. I am fixing my wife's Sequoia now using this as direction. Anyone knows if Toyota has improved the bracket? I wonder if I install this, it is going to break again. It is such a pain to fix this.
Yes, unfortunately it will eventually break again. The new and old bracket are identical and made of die cast aluminum which has no specific minimum stress cycles it can endure before it fails again from metal fatigue due to its properties according to mechanical engineers I work with here. Poor choice of material and design is the primary issue. Hopefully it should last just as long so you won't have to think about it for several years.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Excellent write up! You're a brave man Jack.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
222 Posts
Does anyone knows if I can install the Tundra parts into Sequoia? The local dealer said that Toyota discontinued making the parts for Sequoia, and he was not sure the one from Tundra will fit. Not only fixing this is a pain, finding the parts is becoming a nightmare...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Does anyone knows if I can install the Tundra parts into Sequoia? The local dealer said that Toyota discontinued making the parts for Sequoia, and he was not sure the one from Tundra will fit. Not only fixing this is a pain, finding the parts is becoming a nightmare...
Check out at the dealer if the Sequoia part numbers match the ones above that I originally listed. Most of the screws and bolts could probably be reused as in my case, but you'll definitely need the support bracket and shaft assembly. Actually, I did a comparison a while ago against a 2002 vs. 2004 tundra and the only difference was the lower steering column shaft. Have them pull a complete breakdown from your vehicle's year number and a Tundra's to see if they're identical so you'll know absolutely if they'll fit and what differs.

Your only other alternative is to purchase one from a salvage yard. An online one that breaks down the vehicle and stores the components out of the weather might be preferable unless you can find a decent totalled vehicle close by in your area by calling around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I can't thank you enough Jack. I would have never had the cojones to take on this project without reading your write up.

My problem was that my 7 yr. old was hell bent on making the car go into gear and ended up breaking the shift lever in an identical way as shown in your photos.

I can verify that the thread size in the tilt pins is 8-32. I bought a 1" long 8-32 screw and dropped it through the bolt hole in the broken piece of the tunnel and screwed it into the tilt pin. Now I had a much larger head than just the head of the screw. I used two pry bars under the broken tunnel piece and the pins came out fairly easily after scrapping back the punched down tunnel material around the tilt pins.

I understood from the dealer that the more recent sequoias/tundras have a two piece steering column tunnel. That was not the case for me. I had to replace the entire one piece tunnel. So, I did not have the 4 lobular torx bolts holding the two tunnel pieces together and alleviating the need to take the ignition key lock armature off the tunnel. My problem was the two bolts holding the ignition key lock armature onto the steering column tunnel had no head and no socket for either torx or Allen wrench. The only solution was to drill the lobular bolt head and use a screw extractor with a little heat application to the back side to unscrew those bolts. Again, thanks for that tip on using heat Jack! A little butane soldering torch was very handy for this.

I used two standard metric bolts (m8-1.25x35) with washers to attach the key lock armature to the new steering tunnel. I put everything back together and it's as good as new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hello Jack. Looking to do the same but not sure exactly how the slide hammer attaches to the screw inserted in the pivot pin. Can you (or anyone else) let me know exactly how this is done (preferably posting a picture as well). Thanks in advance. (First time visiting this forum so hoping for good luck!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I can't recall off the top of my head how it attached. I do know you can borrow them at autozone, although I used my father's slide hammer. I remember fitting an 8-32 screw about 1/4" deep into the pivot pin and then removing it to secure it onto the end of the slide hammer.

Hopefully the guys at autozone can let you know. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
I've just been looking at the shifter assembly on my '03 Tundra, trying to decide whether it would be worth the trouble of designing a repair kit.

Scratching my head a bit as to why this problem is occurring but after watching a YouTube video on the repair I have the answer. The shifter assembly 33501-0C011 attaches to the support bracket 45859-07010 by three screws 90080-16039. The holes in the bracket that receive the three screws come from the factory untapped and the three screws cut their own threads as they are installed. The problem is the thread-cutting screws don't cut threads as well as a tapping operation would and so the screws also try to compress the metal around the hole. Well, the metal can't really compress but the radial outward force that the screw exerts creates a circumferential tensile stress around the hole. Where there is lots of metal around the hole this is not a problem but in the hole closest to the driver the part is too weak to resist the circumferential tensile stress.

So this is a Toyota design problem.

An inappropriate design feature plus an inferior thread-cutting screw produces a circumferential tensile stress in a location where the part is too weak to resist it. The ear of the support bracket cracks off and the shifter assembly, now unsupported at the corner, eventually breaks in two places due to repeated bending stresses.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,463 Posts
One tip to add to Jack's great writeup.
There is now a new part number for the shaft assembly 33501-0C012 which is made from steel instead of aluminum. This is definitely the part you want ... much stronger!! :tu:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Hi mibro, you seem to have a deal of technical knowledge on the materials. Would it help to tack weld the shifter assembly to the ear of he support bracket for added support? Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
New here, great posting.

My shifter is broken with the truck stuck in neutral. I need a quick and dirty way to get the covers off the steering column and be able to drive my stranded vehicle home. Any thoughts, tool suggestions? I have most of the "normal" tools, but no torx sockets, etc. I'm not adverse to cutting up the plastic covers, it's prolly cheaper than a tow! I just need to be able to move the linkage without the lever.

Thanks again,

W.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
New here, great posting.

My shifter is broken with the truck stuck in neutral. I need a quick and dirty way to get the covers off the steering column and be able to drive my stranded vehicle home. Any thoughts, tool suggestions? I have most of the "normal" tools, but no torx sockets, etc. I'm not adverse to cutting up the plastic covers, it's prolly cheaper than a tow! I just need to be able to move the linkage without the lever.

Thanks again,

W.

See step 1: Turn the steering wheel 90 degrees toward the right to expose a screw head under it to remove, then turn the steering wheel 90 degrees toward the left and do the same. I believe that's all it takes to remove the cover at least IIRC.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top