Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sometimes in the winter, first thing in the morning, it used to be very difficult to get my 2003 Tundra to shift out of park. Some days it was so bad I was surprised something did not break under my force. Originally, the dealer tried to clean up some of the rust on the cable but that solution did not last long. I promised myself before winter set in again, I would replace the cable.

Attached is my DIY on how to get the job done. I put a lot of detail into this so even an inexperienced mechanic like me should be able to complete this project.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Good writeup. Be sure to report back as to whether or not this (permanently) fixed the problem.
Winter is now half over and I have not had a single problem with the shift cable no matter what the weather is. This appears to be an easy and reliable fix for anyone having trouble shifting their Tundra into gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I spoke too soon about this problem being resolved.

Winter just refuses to go away this year. Lately, we have had a fair amount of rain and temperatures in the 30's. The combination of moisture in the air and cold temperatures seems to make shifting into drive really stiff. I do not think it is as bad as it was before I replaced the cable but it is definitely abnormally stiff. I really do not know what the problem is. It might be noteworthy to add that I always park my Tundra outside and we have a cement driveway. Hopefully, by refreshing this thread, somebody will see it again and no the answer. In the meantime, I will wait for warmer weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I have to replace my shift cable assembly but can’t find any tutorials online. This original poster made a write up with pics but for some reason I can’t view it. Can anyone help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I have to replace my shift cable assembly but can’t find any tutorials online. This original poster made a write up with pics but for some reason I can’t view it. Can anyone help?
Make sure you are opening the link with a computer that can view a pdf. file. If you are using a phone, that could be the problem. The link works fine for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Sometimes in the winter, first thing in the morning, it used to be very difficult to get my 2003 Tundra to shift out of park. Some days it was so bad I was surprised something did not break under my force. Originally, the dealer tried to clean up some of the rust on the cable but that solution did not last long. I promised myself before winter set in again, I would replace the cable.

Attached is my DIY on how to get the job done. I put a lot of detail into this so even an inexperienced mechanic like me should be able to complete this project.
My cable snapped at the shift linkage. Really grateful for this comprehensive write-up. Thank so very much for having taken the time to do this. 3 hrs for me, too. Much of it on that damned bracket off the bell housing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Thanks for the write up Pinnacle, 8 years later and still useful on Gen 2. My broken cable happened while trying to adjust the length as the truck wasn’t getting far enough into park to close the switch and let the truck start. I also have a brutally stiff shift lever when cold, and wanted to address it at the seal into the transmission; assumed it was gummed up there. Broke the shift shaft trying to get the nut off that holds the shift lever on. Job just got complicated, as they are want to do.
image.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
Sorry to hear yours snapped Dave. Couple of suggestions when you install the new cable. Have the tranny and shifter in neutral when installing the new cable. This isnt to say for sure an older Tundra but I would be willing to bet its the same. It just helps ensure the cable is properly centred and what you experienced with the vehicle being able to start like it was tells me it might have been out of alignment, as well as rusty.
On that note, the other suggestion is rust proof the truck yearly with something like Krown. It might have meant that issue you had never happened in the first place and it also helps for doing other work on the truck when you remove hardware that is seized in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Thanks for the reply. I’m having difficulty finding information on part numbers and how to remove and replace the shift shaft and the seal. Perhaps I can replace the seal only and just weld the shift control lever on; it just needs a tack to prevent it from sliding off of the rectangular drive of that shaft. Anyone have good info on parts diagrams for these? Tips on getting that seal out with the shaft in place?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
How much is left of the stud? Any chance you can just chase a die down in and rethread it? I have no clue about that shaft but I would think that would be a huge job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
She’s gonna be a farmer job as the alternative is open heart surgery and that would be the end I think. The shaft broke flush with the surface of the lever, so I could maybe drill and tap the end; I assume it’s a case hardened shaft so the inside should be soft enough. But access to it for that work is a problem. So instead I’m going to drill a hole through the shaft near the lever, and a couple holes in the lever, clean everything well, throw on some JB Weld and wire it up while it hardens. If the JB fails, I’ll try some SS weld rod using A/C and a wet rag around the shaft to try to keep the heat to a min and not melt the seal, but that’s a little iffy. And if I mess up, it’s off to some young guy who wants to yank out the tranny and get himself a dandy truck for cheap. I don’t have the time! I did discover that the original problem was the neutral safety / PRNDL switch. Was seizing up. This all should have been the cost of some PB Blaster and a drop of grease. You don’t always win at this DIY game!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
She’s off the jack stands. My fix for the broken shift selector shaft end that broke off was the above described drilling, wire, and JB weld. I like the look of it and it’s holding after lots of test shifts so we’ll see.

My problem was really the neutral switch. I’m a mechanical engineer who started my career in the powertrain department at Western Star Trucks in Kelowna, BC. Good times. Anyway, I can’t figure out some of the design decisions. People love to poke fun at the dumb designs engineers come up with and I get it, but often there is an unapparent reason for why something has to be that way. Sometimes not. Does anyone know why the shift selector shaft must protrude through the neutral switch entirely? And assuming there’s a reason for that, why would they not have a normal type of shaft seal on the switch instead of this odd aluminum cast, split threaded post with a round nut with low torque around that shaft, just inviting crud in there to bind things up and fuse things together. My neighbour’s Tacoma has the same issue.

I could not remove my neutral switch. In fact, while watching the switch and changing gears, the shaft, threads, nut and the funny washer all turned as one. So the shaft had fused to the threaded part and broke it free from the switch. Switch still works. I broke one quarter of the threaded shaft trying to free it, but in the end, not wanting to fix something that is working, I simply put the nut on with next to no torque and covered the whole mess with grease. So far so good. Here’s some pics.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
Cant say as I know why it pokes through but I work for Toyota in manufacturing and one thing I learned is they try to commonize as many parts as possible through all model lines ups. Maybe something to do with this design can be slapped on just about any tranny?
Either way nice work with the Macgyver job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I've got a 2005 SR5 that won't shift out of park. There were times over the last few months that shifting would be hard and the dash lights would not turn on to indicate what gear I had shifted to. When I disconnect the trans cable in the console I'm able to move the shifter just fine I cleaned and Lubed up the linkage under the truck and still no luck. Can anyone point me in the right direction to head next please??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
From my very recent experience, I would disconnect the cable from the shift lever under the truck. Then see how it shifts from the column. If easy, it’s not your cable. Before reattaching the cable, really clean the stud that the cable end eyelet goes onto. Mine was very corroded and the eyelet could almost not be turned on that stud. Sand the rust off, grease it up. Before reassembling the cable, shift the truck by hand with the lever; should be easy to click through the gears. If it’s not, your problem is with the safety switch on the other end of the shaft, on the passenger side of the transmission. Read what I’ve written in earlier posts and see if you can do something there. Best to disassemble the neutral/PRNDL switch from the tranny if possible. I couldn’t. The connector for the switch is right on the switch so no harness to mess with. Clean and lubricate as best you can. If you can get those done you should be good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I've got a 2005 SR5 that won't shift out of park. There were times over the last few months that shifting would be hard and the dash lights would not turn on to indicate what gear I had shifted to. When I disconnect the trans cable in the console I'm able to move the shifter just fine I cleaned and Lubed up the linkage under the truck and still no luck. Can anyone point me in the right direction to head next please??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I'll give it a go when I get off work, thank you. Any reason you didn't take the shift lever off the trans first to avoid damaging the stud? My shift lever is bolted on that stud. Should I start there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I’m sorry I mis-stated the lever and shaft part: the cable is connected to the end of the lever; take that apart and clean that post and the inside of the eyelet cable end (I didn’t have a problem with that stud/post, it was the nut on the end of the shaft that held the lever on - I twisted the end of the shaft off... oops. Best to leave that alone). When I disconnected the cable, I broke the cable. $400. There is no reason to remove the lever from the shift selector shaft into the transmission, unless trans oil was coming out of the seal there. However, based on what you said about your dash lights, I think you’ll find that you need to clean up the neutral / PRNDL switch sitting on the passenger side of the tranny.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top