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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mine is trashed. Jon's using a 1-ton GM bearing that costs about 1/10 of Toyota's part. Anybody else using anything different?

Jon, what did you end up doing to make the GM part work (other than the crossmember)?
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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I've also been looking into replacing mine as well. The best price I found was around $200. Ouch. My local dealer lack-of-service department wants a minimum 3 hour labor charge. Other folks here have done it in about 45 minutes.

What is the issue with yours? I think I have too much play in it, i.e. the rubber is degraded, and it is allowing a high-speed vibration in my driveshaft. That's just a guess...
 

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One piece shaft solves this :devil:.

I do like the idea of the GM center bearing. If I ever went back to a 2-piece shaft, I would look into this more. But the Tundra will be going through a heavy rebuild before this ever happens. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The rubber bushing is degraded...there's about 1/8" of free play, and the bearing itself is just sitting at the bottom of what remains of the rubber bushing. I did notice a new vibration a week or so ago, but who knows if this is the source.

I'm not a huge fan of replacing a metal strap and a bearing, both of which are probably in adequate shape, all for the sake of replacing this piece of rubber.

Hendrix makes a support, I've heard it will work on 1st-gen Tacoma shafts, so it may work on 1st-gen Tundra shafts as well. It uses bushings separate from the bearing itself, replaceable, although it does look like a firmer mount than stock, and may transfer more vibration...also, some fabrication will be required as the foot width isn't the same as stock. The advantage is the bearing and isolation media are replaceable separately, and the bushings just look like swaybar or similar type to my eye...much cheaper to replace than the entire mount.



Most of the sponsoring dealers will sell you the Toyota part for around 150$...without any discount, you're right, it's a 200$ part which is absolutely mental for what amounts to replacing a rubber donut...as if I were being asked to replace the oil pan every time I changed the oil. Just silly, IMHO.

Hendrix hasn't called back yet...if their product will work, I'll probably go that route, for a durable part and the ability to change the bearing and isolators independent of each other.
 

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My rear drive shaft was built for using a GM carrier bearing, so there was nothing to do but bolt it on. I was going through the GM 1-ton bearings about every 6 months until I rebuilt the cross member and got the bearing aligned with the slope of the upper shaft, that was about a year ago and the bearing is still like new. I'm convinced that mis-alignment is what's killing the bearings.

Another option I was looking into was the poly version from Inland Empire Driveline, prior to getting my bearing in line with the new cross member. I have heard that there's more vibration translated to the chassis when using these though......

http://www.iedls.com/Center-Support-Bearings/Pickup-Trucks.asp
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got the Hendrix part in hand, took apart the Toyota carrier and pulled the bearing, just need to check some angles, and it looks like I just need to drill a couple holes and I can mount the piece.

The rubber piece wasn't torn or melted like I thought, just degraded enough that there was a lot of slop between the rubber carrier and the bearing carrier.

The OEM bearing was in great shape, the grease around it had started to harden, but the bearing itself is fine. It's marked 6006DU, Made In Japan, and has a couple other numbers I wrote down at home.

To remove the bearing, work the metal bearing sleeve out from the rubber carrier. I used a couple screwdrivers, it was easy.

Next, put the metal sleeve & bearing in a vise, around either smaller diameter end of the part. You're going to destroy the metal sleeve now now. Put some channel locks on the half of the sleeve that's not in the jaws of the vise, and twist...it'll start to rotate. Keep twisting and pulling gently up, it'll turn off...it's a snug fit, not threaded, just pressed in.

To get the other half of the metal sleeve off the bearing, gently crush the smaller outer diameter of the sleeve in the vise, working your way around the edge. It'll pull the sleeve away from the edges of the bearing, and you'll be able to easily pull the bearing out.

The only thing the Hendrix part is currently lacking IMHO is a seal for the intermediate shaft, but I also haven't asked them about it yet, nor have I gone hunting through the McMC catalog for a potential part # yet.

More later, after it's installed...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's a wicked vibration over 45mph...not sure if I put the yoke on the wrong way (it appears to be lined up, I forgot to make matchmarks! :mad: ) or if the support system just doesn't have enough 'give' to it.

I guess I'm messing with it tonight, and I'll have to put an OEM piece on order :mad:...which is exactly what I did NOT want to do...
 

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So you are going to use the toyota one after all? I am thinking I need change mine out, I have been getting a clunk that comes when I am about to stop or leaving a stop. It seems to be in unison with the speed my shaft rotates. I was hoping it was brakes or a flat spot on my tires(which it does sound like) but no luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a trip planned, leaving Friday, so I need a solution now...don't have time to make the Hendrix part work in time.

I'm pretty sure the vibration is just a result of the angle I put in the driveshaft...I stuck it up pretty high at first. Over the weekend I brought it down a bit, and put another damper between the carrier and the frame, and it really helped...very little vibration, only between about 35 and 47 mph, but considering that's where most in-town driving happens, it's not going to work yet. I'm pretty sure the carrier just needs to be in an accommodating location for the pinion angle I'm running, centered along the driveline, and suitably isolated, and the Hendrix part will work fine. I was driving around at highway speed after I dropped it down a little more and added the additional damper, so I'm sure with the right changes, I'll be running the Hendrix part rather than the stock part.

In the mean time, Gary hooked me up with a new part at a great price, and it's sitting next to me here at work, gonna throw it in tonight. FWIW...the bearing is very snug in the carrier...not like the sloppy 10-year-old part I took off my truck.
 

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Here's the cross member we built to mount the bearing to, this fixed all my problems, still on the bearing I installed over a year ago and it still feels fine......oh......and you can't twist and deflect this cross member by hand like you can that super stout factory one those twits installed :rolleyes:.











 

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Are you running a GM shaft (or something like it), from the Atlas to the 14b?
Both the rear upper and lower are custom shafts from Tom Woods with 1350 u-joints at the ends and a clearanced 1350 CV in the middle. So basically it's 0.120" wall tubing with spicer joints and a 1-ton GM carrier. The front shaft is a Tom Woods 0.120" wall with 1350 CV at the t-case and 1350 u-joint at the diff and a 10" slip.
 

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Usually when the center bearing is worn out the U-joints are worn as well, putting more stress on the center bearing and hastening its demise. My mechanic recommended always replacing U-joints when replacing center support bearing, I do so, removing the shaft myself and sending it to Oceanside Driveline. They disassemble, new U-joints, new carrier bearing, service slip yoke, clean, paint, and balance. Usually around $325 and good as new! Here is a link to my build thread with more details: 6 Million Dollar Tundra Revival
 
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