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Just ran into the thread regarding ways to extend transmission life, but nothing was mentioned concerning driving habits that would contribute to the longevity. Some time ago I purchased a book titled "Drive it Forever" that discussed the many ways to make a vehicle last indefinitely. One of the things I remember being mentioned was that when you sense the transmission initiating an upshift, it was suggested to ease up on the accelerator a bit to "help" it into the next gear lessening the stress on the transmission. Makes sense to me considering lift throttle is used with manual transmission cars (assuming no powershifting) although they do have more of a direct connection between engine and transmission thus requiring full throttle lift as opposed to the slight ease of throttle pressure on an automatic which has perhaps a significant amount of mechanical connection isolated by fluid in the torque converter to cushion gear changes. I'm guessing this should make the clutches in an auto last longer.

I have been driving automatics this way ever since. I'm at 108,000 miles on my Tundra so far that has included a substantial amount of city driving and towing on some weekends and the transmission still shifts just as good as the day I bought it. I do romp on it on occasion with full throttle on the roll, but rarely from a dead stop.
 

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I'm not sure, but I can tell you how to break it.
 

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I do the reduce-power-right-before-shift thing, too. Especially now with 144,000. I still have the slow/rough shift from 1st to 2nd that a lot of people experience will violently lurch the truck if you give high throttle from low speed (just before the tranny shifts to 2nd). But as long as I'm gentle and let up a bit when I sense the tranny being "indecisive" about going from 1st to 2nd.
 

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i did this on my old tacoma and now on my tundra. the tundra seems to be much slower to shift when no throttle is applied. it shifts perfectly and quickly when holding the accelerator gently but often times when i let off the gas for a shift, when i step on it again i seem to hit the end of the shift and it has the effect of a light neutral drop.

anyone else experience slower shifts using this method or provide an explanation?
 

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Most computer controlled engine/transmission combo's communicate with each other and just before the shift the engine will retard power until the shift is completed.
 
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