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Discussion Starter #1
When I purchased my 07 it was suppose to come with a drop in liner, dealer called Friday and said it would be a while before they could get one and wanted to know if I wanted to wait or get a refund for the drop in liner.

After reading a few posts on the line x bedliner, I'm now reconsider the line x bedliner over the drop in, my question; Does anyone in the Southwest desert area have experience with the durability of line x bedliner with the extreme heat and sun?
 

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Hi Blur,
I live in hot So. California and I love my line-x. Had it for 4 years with zero problems. It's the best on the market IMO.
 

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Hi Blur,
I live in hot So. California and I love my line-x. Had it for 4 years with zero problems. It's the best on the market IMO.
Thanks..........Oh Upland, you know heat. I used to live by Lake Elsinore
 

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I own a 1990 toyota p/u, have had the line-x in it since 1994.

My truck and I have been all over. Less than 0 degrees and above 120. 13 years and it is still holding up fairly well. Have used the heck out of the bed too, motorcycles, camping gear, dirt, bark, bricks, lumber, cement, gold mining equipment, I could go on and on. There are only a few nicks where it has been hit hard by a tool, rock, or brick.

My ordered 07 will be here within a month. Line-X will be one of the first things that gets done. You will not be disappointed!!!
 

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Temperature tolerance is 220 degrees F to -40 degrees F (per some brand new ASTM testing data). For UV protection, I highly recommend LINE-X Xtra. It will keep the liner from fading and is extremely durable (contains a Kevlar micro pulp).

Oh yea, new tensile strength with ASTM D412 is 2,147 psi. :cool:
 

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I too was waiting on the delivery of the plastic hard liner to be installed on my DC. The day it was supposed to be there, it didnt make it.The dealer took it and had my bed sprayed. You will not regret it, it looks great. I would imagine the heat alone will test it in Central Texas. Lots of times it's over 100 for 30 plus days in the summer. Spray liner all the way.:D
 

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I was always intrigued by Line-X and it looks great. Then I bought a 2005 Powerstroke F-250 last fall and it had a "Rhino Liner" brand spray-in liner in it (probably the only comptetition to Line-X). I had never heard of Rhino Liner before and was very familiar with Line-X since we have a local dealer but had just never talked myself into trying it. After purchasing a truck that already had a Rhino Lining I fell in love with it. We torture the heck out of it here on the farm. Fantastic stuff. Rhino Lining and Line-X are both used by the US Deptarment of Defense in treating vehicle panels and walls to improve their damage tolerance from explosive blasts.

I also import 4x4 Japanese minitrucks so I wanted to save money and bought some of the roll-on Hurculiner bed liner coating from Pep Boys and tried some of that in my minitrucks. There is no comparison. The Rhino Liner and Line-X are far, far superior than the one-part Xylol-based cheap stuff like Hurculiner or whater it is that JC Whitney sells. Don't go there at all if you want a real spray-in bed liner.

I have read reviews that said Line-X has a smoother finish than Rhino Liner and I'm not sure never having owned a Line-X product. Personally I like the rough texture of Rhino Liner. The Rhino Liner feels like rubber and is placed thicker on the bed floor than walls. The process is a 4-part mixed at the spray pistol nozzle. I assume Line-X is done the same after reading a post on TS about how it is applied.

I go for the standard black color as it is the most naturally resistant to UV breakdown and is what 95% of the dealers spray so the cost is signinficantly less than colors without the need for future UV coating maintenance.

So the first thing I did to my new 2007 Tundra was take it over to the Rhino Linings dealer and have the whole bed done (longbed DCab). $399 with a lifetime warranty. In order to get a proper job the factory paint must be removed from the bed and this was accomplished with an angle grinder with plastic brush wheels. Don't watch it if you get woozy seeing your new truck bed roughed up. The bottom line is that for any of these products to work correctly (and for a lifetime) the bed has to be roughed up this way. The tailgate was removed and the access panel was removed to be coated seperately. The large Torx bed bolts were removed from the bed before spraying. The 4-part material itself seems to be a thermosetting polymer that starts setting up exothermically almost immediately. After spraying the liner the bolts and tailgate access panel were replaced. Normally the spray-in folks remove the corner tie-down anchors from the bed but I requested they leave them and spray them too. When they are done the results are spectacular so the traumatic prep work is a faded memory. I added a Toyota OEM rubber bed mat on top (my normal proceedure -- if I had nothing else I would have a rubber mat).
Another thing. If you find one of those pesky new car sales people at your local Toyota dealer talking down spray-in liners remember the salesman can make a commission selling you a plastic liner and nothing if you go for an aftermarket spray-in. Plastic and spray-in are an apples and oranges comparison and each has it's application but if the salesperson says that spray-ins do all sorts of terrible things to your bed don't you believe it. Much of this lore is left over from the first couple of years of Nissan Titans where the factory robots sprayed the bedliners on beds without any preperation other than the original smooth factory paint. Those Titan beds have a problem with delamination and bubbles and Nissan sends most of their warranty claims to local Rhino Liner dealers to do the whole thing over correctly. Line-X and Rhino offer lifetime warranties on their product.
 

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Line-X is actually far superior to Rhino because it hardens instantly upon application whereas Rhino does not. The Rhino is, therefore, thinner in spots, while the Line-X produces a much more uniform coating.
 

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That is because you have been looking for a truck in Texas, part of the Gulf States Region (HQ right with you Houston, by the way). Gulf States will only give you trucks with what *they* want you to buy and in the process will maximize their profits by shoving port installed options like paint stripes, sealant protection and small engines down your throat.

I had to go to New Mexico and bought my longbed in Las Cruces. There were two like mine on the lot similarly equipped (with factory-installed JBL). Drive 40 miles east to El Paso, Texas and the dealers will tell you this truck is not available. Crossing the state line is like crossing the iron curtain. The dealers in El Paso are forbidden to even call and talk to the dealers in Las Cruces. It's a damn shame as I would just as soon give business to a dealer in my home state of Texas -- but oh well, the Denver region has trucks ordered in configured how we like them here on the farm and it's worth the trip to get 'em that way without the Gulf States BS.

I freaked out Texas Toyota dealers from San Antonio to Corpus with my Longbed DCab 4x4 as I stopped in for parts and accessories. Sales folks would surround my truck saying they had never seen a longbed DC 4x4 with accessories and options like I had.

To prove my point all you have to do is go to the Toyota web site and build a truck under two different zip codes; one zip code being yours and one being in NM, AZ or CO (try 88005 for Las Cruces). It's like your on a completely different web site with different option codes and packages. Those western states are under the direct control of Toyota and not under control of independent distributors like Gulf States or Southeast Toyota Distributors. These private companys call the shots in their states and limit your buying options. It's pure craziness.
 

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I guess I don't understand. The Rhino material we sparyed on at the Rhino Linings of Corpus Christi facility had about an instantaneous set-up time and we immediately handled the parts after spraying. The bed floor got about 9 coats and the sidewalls got 4 to 5 coats. We put the tailgate access panel right back on the tailgate after spraying (I was barehanded and it was not very sticky). I removed this same access panel two days later to install the backup camera and it hadn't stuck to the coated tailgate structure at all despite the machine screw clamp-up force applied the day of spraying. Seems like it was dry immediately just like you say Line-X is. I'll get a Line-X on my next one (I buy a truck about every 10 months) to see what differences there are if any.
 

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Rhino and LINE-X are both two part products, isocyanate and a polyol resin.

If your "Rhino" is TuffStuff, which is the most common bedliner product, it gels in 30-45 seconds and dries in about 45 minutes. LINE-X is dry in about 4 seconds. All times are approximate and vary depending on the air's temperature and humidity. Rhino's Tuff Stuff is MUCH more sensitive to humidity than LINE-X. Reason: Water slows the process down and also interferes with adhesion. LINE-X contains polyurea which keeps moisture out of the resin.

Rhino has another product called Durabond, which may set up faster. Durabond uses a a high pressure application system and does not use the same machine as what is used for TuffStuff. So, if you proportioner was set at about 1,500 psi, it was not TuffStuff. Very few Rhino dealers have the equipment to spray Durabond.
 

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I have had Line X for about 4 years. I too agree it is thicker application than Rhino. Line x also had a product to re-dye the bed liner if you want. Mine being black, I apply the liquid towards the end of each year when I am through with lawn business which often results in red cypress mulch dye leaking onto the liner. The Red dye just wont wash out so I use the Line x dye.
I didnt have a chip in Line x on the tailgate, which they were able to repair in 10 minutes with a re seal of the area.
 

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I had Rhino liner in my F-150 for almost 7 years and have no complaints about it, other than the fading; but a coat of tire and engine cleaner from the car wash restores the finish. I have considered Line-X for my '06 DC, but I really can't see the difference between Line-X and a drop in bedliner. For me, the entire reason for getting a spray in liner is to have a rubbery texture so all the junk in your bed doesn't slide around while driving. Line-X might not be as slick as a drop in, but for me, there is no comparisson; I'll be getting a Rhino in my DC.
 

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Line-X is the bees knees period. The walls in the pentagon are now coated with the stuff. Its extremely strong and if the military trusts it to protect our troops then its more than adequate for a truck bed.
 

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I have read a lot about linex and how wonderful it is but has anyone had any experience with pressure treated wood installed in the bed? A good friend says his linex dented over time...or rather the bed dented...with plywood, who really cares how bad the wood gets beat up...you could simply replace it before selling...also, the bed paint would not have to be stripped to install the plywood.....plywood is appealing to me as it would allow a sled to be loaded into the bed without possible damage to the carbides (metal runners under the skis)....

any thoughts on a plywood deck?
 

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How is it for holding items in place? I usually use rubber mats because stuff stays put. I like that.
 

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How is it for holding items in place? I usually use rubber mats because stuff stays put. I like that.
?????
 
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