Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone put an Eaton E-locker on their 2WD 1st Gen Tundra? My 2004 2WD Tundra has the factory LSD, but it has let me down one too many times. My truck sucks in the snow, even with 400 lbs of weight over the read axle. I thought of selling the truck and getting a 2006 4WD Tundra, but if I can achieve the traction I need in the occasional snow and mud (doesn't happen too often, but at least a couple times per year), then I'd be willing to spend the money to get an e-locker. The manufacturer says I need new carrier bearings. Not sure why this is. Hopefully there aren't any other major modifications required. Anyone done this? Did it improve traction dramatically over the 2WD with LSD?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
After some thorough research, I decided to go with the Eaton Truetrac. It's basically an LSD but uses worm gears instead of clutch plates, so it never needs servicing. The E-locker sounds like it is more geared towards offroad, which I don't need, and when not energized behaves like an open diff, so the Truetrac sounded like the better option for me considering this is a daily driver. I'll post back with my impressions for anyone that is interested.
 
  • Like
Reactions: H2O_MAN

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,283 Posts
Are you still running Michelins that I see in your signature? What model are they? Michelin make amazing tires but that also depends on the model you use. Years ago I had a 2wd F150 with snows just on the back. That thing was a tank in even the deepest snow and I never put weight in the back. I dont know how much a new diff is but better tires might be something to consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Are you still running Michelins that I see in your signature? What model are they? Michelin make amazing tires but that also depends on the model you use. Years ago I had a 2wd F150 with snows just on the back. That thing was a tank in even the deepest snow and I never put weight in the back. I dont know how much a new diff is but better tires might be something to consider.
Yes, I'm still running the same Michelins. They are basically still new. I didn't realize clutch-based LSDs wear out after 20k to 30k, so I've been driving around with an open diff this entire time and didn't even realize it. No wonder my truck sucks in the mud and snow, even with 400lbs over the rear wheels.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2 Posts
Anyone put an Eaton E-locker on their 2WD 1st Gen Tundra? My 2004 2WD Tundra has the factory LSD, but it has let me down one too many times. My truck sucks in the snow, even with 400 lbs of weight over the read axle. I thought of selling the truck and getting a 2006 4WD Tundra, but if I can achieve the traction I need in the occasional snow and mud (doesn't happen too often, but at least a couple times per year), then I'd be willing to spend the money to get an e-locker. The manufacturer says I need new carrier bearings. Not sure why this is. Hopefully there aren't any other major modifications required. Anyone done this? Did it improve traction dramatically over the 2WD with LSD?
I put a detroit locker in the rear and a detroit truetrac in the front (I think they are both officially eaton). Been over 100k miles with zero issues and no special maintenance required. I love them. My truck is a 2002 4WD Tundra. I generally don't do low traction stuff without 4WD engaged. The lockers work. I can go places other 4WD trucks can't. Primary off road use is hunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Locker in the rear and LSD in front? I thought the preferred config was locker in front and LSD in rear since the rear is used the majority of the time and you wouldn't get the benefits of an LSD with it being in front where it is seldom used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
you got it solved. 2wd without lsd is totally worthless truck imo. I put the TRD lsd on mine...fantastic. Your clutch plates should darn near never wear out...not sure whats wrong with your lsd. high traction Rear tires are crucial. I think Chuck_Henry did it how i would if i had to do over again. But you'll be real happy with what you're doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
you got it solved. 2wd without lsd is totally worthless truck imo. I put the TRD lsd on mine...fantastic. Your clutch plates should darn near never wear out...not sure whats wrong with your lsd. high traction Rear tires are crucial. I think Chuck_Henry did it how i would if i had to do over again. But you'll be real happy with what you're doing.
I read that clutch plates on the factory LSD only last up to 30k. Sounds premature to me, but it makes sense that they would wear down over time and you'd eventually end up with an open diff. I'm at 155k miles, so I'm betting the plates are toast. I have high hopes for the Truetrac. Think I'll throw on some A/T tires too for that much more traction. Thinking about the Cooper AT3s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Isn't a lock diff an open diff when it isn't engaged? If so, seems to me you'd want the locked diff in the front and LSD in the rear, otherwise you're driving around with an open diff the majority of the time. Maybe okay on a jeep or SUV but not on a pickup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Can someone confirm that the 1st gen Tundra has the 8.4" rear end? I need to get a master rebuild kit (bearings, seals, etc) and need to be sure I get the proper one. I believe the Yukon YK T100 is the right one, but it says T100 and Tacoma most places, with a note on a related page that says (2000-2006 Tundra). It doesn't specifically say Tundra on the bearing kit page though. I'm also looking at the Motive Gear R11RTACMK kit. The Yukon kit comes with Timken bearings and the Motive comes with Koyo. Both are comparable in price (Yukon is $20 more).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Can someone confirm that the 1st gen Tundra has the 8.4" rear end? I need to get a master rebuild kit (bearings, seals, etc) and need to be sure I get the proper one. I believe the Yukon YK T100 is the right one, but it says T100 and Tacoma most places, with a note on a related page that says (2000-2006 Tundra). It doesn't specifically say Tundra on the bearing kit page though. I'm also looking at the Motive Gear R11RTACMK kit. The Yukon kit comes with Timken bearings and the Motive comes with Koyo. Both are comparable in price (Yukon is $20 more).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Can someone confirm if the 1st gen Tundra with factory LSD has an 8", 8.25", or 8.4" rear end? I need to get a master rebuild kit (bearings, seals, etc) and need to be sure I get the proper one. I believe the Yukon YK T100 is the right one, but it says T100 and Tacoma most places, with a note on a related page that says (2000-2006 Tundra). It doesn't specifically say Tundra on the bearing kit page though. I'm also looking at the Motive Gear R11RTACMK kit. The Yukon kit comes with Timken bearings and the Motive comes with Koyo. Both are comparable in price (Yukon is $20 more).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Following, Thinking of adding a locker to my 05 2wd as well...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,857 Posts
Can someone confirm if the 1st gen Tundra with factory LSD has an 8", 8.25", or 8.4" rear end? I need to get a master rebuild kit (bearings, seals, etc) and need to be sure I get the proper one. I believe the Yukon YK T100 is the right one, but it says T100 and Tacoma most places, with a note on a related page that says (2000-2006 Tundra). It doesn't specifically say Tundra on the bearing kit page though. I'm also looking at the Motive Gear R11RTACMK kit. The Yukon kit comes with Timken bearings and the Motive comes with Koyo. Both are comparable in price (Yukon is $20 more).
Yes, the first gen tundra has an 8.4" rear end and shares the same rear end as the t100 and tacomas (non e-locker). As for the comment with a front locker, you want to avoid this at all possible. Unless, your rig is a full time wheeler or you have manual locking hubs. A locked front will cause issues with steering and raised the pucker factor when driving on ice. As for the bearings, Koyo bought out Timken years back. So, when you buy a Timken bearing for the tundra, it'll more than likely be stamped with Koyo. Regardless, Timken specific or Koyo, I've used both with no issues.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top