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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 4x4, 2005 Tacoma on Saturday. The previous owner upgraded to 18 wheels and put P275/65R18 tires on it. The tires run fine and don't rub at all in in high 2WD, but when I try to turn in high 4WD, they rub pretty badly. It's a stick shift, and it's actually stopped the truck and caused me to stall out a couple of times (I know it doesn't make any sense that they would rub in high 4WD and not high 2WD, but the fact is, they do). I'm hoping that I don't have to either buy new tires or put a lift kit on there (don't want the inferior ride). My uncle suggested that I get the "torching bars" turned to give me more clearance. Anyone ever heard of this or know if it can be done on a Tacoma?
 

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I think he meant torsion bars, which I am fairly sure aren't used by toyota, they can be cranked for a cheap lift. Is this rubbing on a dry surface or where there is slippage (mud) ?
 

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That's probably what he was talking about. I had a hard time understanding him. It happened in the rain. It seems like I should be able to use 4WD in the rain without so much rubbing. The tires are rubbing against the mud flaps and a bar that's right above the tire and runs kind of parallel to the tire. Do you only use it if you're in a muddy or ice situation?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You're right about the torsion bar. I looked it up, and Toyota stopped using them in 95 (although they still use it in some overseas models)
 

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I only use 4WD on mud/snow/ice. Even then, I need a little extra gas in a tight turn, to account for the front tires slipping. I haven't stalled it yet from this, but I've felt the shudder that tells me I'm about to stall. If trying a turn on a much slicker surface doesn't make you stall, then I think you've found the cause.
 

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Thanks for the help. I've been driving a stick for 6 years, so stalling is a little out of the ordinary at this point. I've uploaded a picture that should help me explain my issue. What's this bar right about the tire called? it's rubbing against this, and causing some pretty serious friction. you can actually see where mud rubbed off the tire onto the bar.
Sorry for the newbie questions. I'm new to this
 

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That is your upper control arm(UCA). What your problem is using 4wd on pavement. Never use 4wd (low or high) on pavment, only on slicker surfaces. Even if it is raining the streets are not slick enough to be able to use 4wd. The tire is going to rub the UCA untill you get different rims is a different back spacing.
 

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Its not rubing much so don't really worry about it.
 

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Ok. In the manual it said it was ok to drive in 4WD high in the rain so that was why i did it. If i put a coil spacer in there, would that raise it up so that the UCA bar didn't rub? thanks for the advice
 

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no the spacer will not help no matter the amount of lift, the tire will still rub. you could buy aftermarket UCAs (light racing, total chaos) those are a couple good brands. When the first rain hit here, that I had my truck, I also put it in 4wd within 1 mile it was binding up like crazy. The spacer will only make it ride like crap also.
 

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ya a 1.25" spidertraxs wheels spacer will work just fine. Then will be no need for aftermarket UCAs.
 

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Ok. In the manual it said it was ok to drive in 4WD high in the rain so that was why i did it.
The manual was probably written based on the assumption you'd have stock tires that came from the factory. In that case, those tires slip so much on wet surfaces:eek: that you likely wouldn't experience any binding in 4wd on a wet surface.:D
 

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The manual was probably written based on the assumption you'd have stock tires that came from the factory. In that case, those tires slip so much on wet surfaces:eek: that you likely wouldn't experience any binding in 4wd on a wet surface.:D

I'll second that. Those tires were awful for me. I had to spend my first winter with the truck in 4WD, and the wet roads come rainy spring time didn't seem much better. Since replacing those tires, I noticed a lot more binding of the front tires while in 4WD on snow/ice, so I pretty much keep it in 2WD now.
 
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