Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had a pair of Fabtech basic coilovers (non-Fox Shocks) installed about 2 years ago, at 22,500 miles, along with purchasing a set of BFG A/T's (285's) on my 03' SR5 AC 4x4 at 4 Wheel Parts in San Marcos, CA.

I knew going in that there was a risk factor with respect to the inner CV's possibly leaking. Well, 7500 miles later, they did, as I noticed a nice spray of CV grease on the underside of my truck. And the truck had a tendency to veer to the right, alignment?? Off to 4 Wheel Parts, where they shrugged and said it would cost me $650 to $700 to install new boots, if in fact that was the problem, and BTW, we warned you about the alignment :mad: . So, I figured I would go to the stealership in Carlsbad and get their opinion. They suggested new boots also, which I opted for to the tune of, you guessed it, $678.00 OTD, along with another $84.95 for an alignment.

At 33,000 miles the truck again started to pull to the right :eek: , so I took it in to get a full service, and another $80+ alignment.

Now at 45,000 miles, the pass side front tire has worn on the outside noticeably, the pull to the right is now more of a yank, and when I apply the brakes hard, there is a "clunk" from the right side suspension. :devil:

First question: should I scrap the Fagtech's and get something more quality (I know, I know, you get what you pay for, but I think the installers might have screwed with me)????????

Second question: with the above details, where should I take my truck for repair, and what could/should be done?????

Thanks, John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,253 Posts
OUCH. That's why ya stay away from Four Wheel Parts ;).

Hopefully one of the SoCal guys will chime in, there should be plenty of good places to take the truck. Are you close to Offroad Warehouse? They're on the forums here...try sending a PM to TRDZNTS (I think) or clicking through the sponsor banner, if it's still up.

Replace the Fabtechs if you have the money, but that's not the root of the problem (but the clunk probably is--that shock may be blown)...if you were taking the truck to 4Wheel Parts, stop. They are GPO ("Good for Parts Only"), and usually not even quality parts.

The dealership is able to align your lifted truck, should only run you 50 bucks, not 80...find one who's willing to work with you, not just turn a wrench and throw you out the door. Independent tire/alignment shops can do it too...same thing applies, find a good one. Your results depend entirely on the people, not the chain, definately shop around :tu:. I just re-read your post...the d-ship you're going to is ripping you off. IIRC I paid 50-ish for my alignments at the d-ship...you don't need 4 wheel alignment, they don't touch the rear wheels but may be charging you for the work. Also the d-ship you're going to isn't familiar enough with either their equipment or your truck to do it right. Chances are the coilovers aren't level side to side and it's making the alignment difficult.

Are you willing/able do fix a few of these items yourself? If so, the CV boot fix(es) range from easy to messy and time consuming but still pretty easy, we can talk ya through it if you're interested. Same goes for the coilovers.

To sort out your alignment, get a good pair of dial calipers (or digital), and find a local shop with the recommended Hunter alignment equipment...go there with about 1/2 tank fuel. Once the truck is set up on the rack, throw your weight in sandbags in the driver seat, pull the pins so the suspension is floating, and measure the distance from the lower control arm to the bump stop on the frame...make sure you're taking the measurement in the same place both sides. If it's different more than a millimeter or two, the ride height needs to be adjusted...bring it as low as you're willing/able to go, unless you're also willing to install 930 CV boots and a diff drop spacer. Once the ride height is the same on both sides, you're ready for an alignment :tu:. Have the camber and toe aligned to DJ's specs, and the caster run up as high as possible with the lift height you've chosen.

In general tho, it doesn't matter if it's not quite level side to side, they should still be able to align it just fine...that they haven't shows they don't know what they're doing (or not doing), and don't understand potential sources for their errors. If you can find a place that'll work with you, you'll be able to sort it all out if you let them know from the beginning what you need. I've always had better luck with slower, local joints than bang-em-out busy shops...

You don't need to be as meticulous with the sandbags and the 1/2 tank and everything, but you'll get better results having the truck aligned the way it'll sit when you're driving it. For example, if you regularly carry a load, put the load in the bed before you go.

Hope that makes sense...good luck, and post back if you'd like a hand with the CV boot mods or adjusting the coilovers.

To check for a blown shock, bounce the front end of the truck. When you let go, the bouncing should stop immediately...if not, the shocks are suspect.

-Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
It costs that much to change the CV boots with install! I think I'm gonna crank mine down soon. That isn't worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
But wouldn't it cost that much to put them on too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,955 Posts
But wouldn't it cost that much to put them on too?
no im thinking about 150 bucks to put them on. Hes paying 600 i believe due to the cv boots already being torn and when that happens the whole cv axles have to be replaced as they get dirt/grit in them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,253 Posts
Actually I bet the d-ship is just going for the wallet. I was quoted ~$300 to swap the inner boots...it's fairly easy but time consuming, if you have the time and space it's better to DIY.

You really have to get a lot of filth in there to warrant swapping the entire joint, and even if you do need a new joint, the inner CV is easy to deal with...it's just a spring clip on the inside and a C-clip on the outside.

It's only worth having someone else install the inner CV boots if you're doing a manual hub swap and paying for the labor...then it's an easy side project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Sean,

:ts: for the quite informative post. I don't know if I have the technical aptitude or patience to pull off the alignment you described, but I am going to check for the blown shock tomorrow am. I was suspect of 4WP when they looked at me like I had two heads :eek: after I went back and explained my issues.

Actually, the tech at the stealership stated that the CV's could run with the boots torn for a bit, and that minor dirt would not affect their operation.

Can you service them yourself? Do you have to remove the CV's and axles? I noticed that the boots aren't split like on my old Baja Bug, so you must slip them over each end and then install the whole unit (CV's and axle). I will do a seach for more on this procedure, but thanks again for all the great info on the alignment.

Anybody out therre in North County SD have a reputable alignment tech?

Sean, which stealership would you recommend in the San Diego area?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Are you willing/able do fix a few of these items yourself? If so, the CV boot fix(es) range from easy to messy and time consuming but still pretty easy, we can talk ya through it if you're interested. Same goes for the coilovers.

-Sean
Yep, I am going to look into a set of the Donahoe CO's for replacement, and do the work my self.

What type of tools will be needed? Floor jack? Jack stands?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,253 Posts
When I saw Baja bug I figured you'd DIY :D.

D-ship is correct about being able to run for a bit even with a tear...I ran for a straight week in Utah with a torn boot, didn't see pavement for about 100 miles, all sand/slickrock/desert/dirty water, plus a couple thousand highway miles...the joint is still working fine. Sorry, I'm in CO, can't recommend a d-ship in CA...

CV boot swap is a piece of cake, just really freakishly messy, probably the same as on your bug. You don't need to remove the inner CV...if you're careful not even the outer CV needs to be removed from the hub. Just pull the four bolts (14mm socket) at the bottom of the steering knuckle, pull the inner boot back, pop the snap ring (it's in a retainer, very handy) and slide the axle out of the inner CV joint. It can be a little tricky getting the axle back in like this, it may be easier to just remove the nut on the stub shaft before you take apart the spindle/steering knuckle assembly, and just slide the whole thing out. It's certainly easier to put the shaft back to the inner CV and then slip the hub back on the halfshaft. Last time I did mine, I turned the 930 boot inside out on the shaft so I could see to mate it with the CV core, then just push and turn and it's locked in...also much easier to grease everything with the boot inside out. Trying to reassemble with a greasy boot that hides the parts you're trying to put back together is a worthless pain.

You'll need spring clip pliers, 1/2" drive 14mm socket and 6" extension, floor jack and jack stands, and the right size socket for the nut on the stub shaft, but offhand I'm not sure the size.

And a lot of plastic gloves and paper towels. It's like truck snot :p.

-Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
When I saw Baja bug I figured you'd DIY :D.

D-ship is correct about being able to run for a bit even with a tear...I ran for a straight week in Utah with a torn boot, didn't see pavement for about 100 miles, all sand/slickrock/desert/dirty water, plus a couple thousand highway miles...the joint is still working fine. Sorry, I'm in CO, can't recommend a d-ship in CA...

CV boot swap is a piece of cake, just really freakishly messy, probably the same as on your bug. You don't need to remove the inner CV...if you're careful not even the outer CV needs to be removed from the hub. Just pull the four bolts (14mm socket) at the bottom of the steering knuckle, pull the inner boot back, pop the snap ring (it's in a retainer, very handy) and slide the axle out of the inner CV joint. It can be a little tricky getting the axle back in like this, it may be easier to just remove the nut on the stub shaft before you take apart the spindle/steering knuckle assembly, and just slide the whole thing out. It's certainly easier to put the shaft back to the inner CV and then slip the hub back on the halfshaft. Last time I did mine, I turned the 930 boot inside out on the shaft so I could see to mate it with the CV core, then just push and turn and it's locked in...also much easier to grease everything with the boot inside out. Trying to reassemble with a greasy boot that hides the parts you're trying to put back together is a worthless pain.

You'll need spring clip pliers, 1/2" drive 14mm socket and 6" extension, floor jack and jack stands, and the right size socket for the nut on the stub shaft, but offhand I'm not sure the size.

And a lot of plastic gloves and paper towels. It's like truck snot :p.

-Sean
Sean,

Thanks for all the great advice. Looks like I need to invest in a floor jack and some stands before I get the Donahoes. I seem to have found a good shop in Off Road Warehouse, as they were very helpful over the phone. I also posted over on SoCal Tundras, and found some very helpful advice there too. (Thanks turnitup! :tu: )

Is the procedure in the above post covered with pictures in a manual? I kinda lost you when you were discussing steering knuckles...;)

My truck is my daily as well as weekend warrior, so I have to limit my projects to a two day affair. Any recommendations on a quality shop manual?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Anybody out therre in North County SD have a reputable alignment tech?

Sean, which stealership would you recommend in the San Diego area?
I would definitely recommend Offroad Warehouse based on the phone conversations I've had with them. If I lived in SD, I'd definitely be on my way over there this week to have my truck re-aligned and my wheels balanced, cause my local shops don't have a clue and I fear I will be experiencing your problems in 10,000 miles...

They sell this stuff and also service trucks, so they should be VERY knowledgeable about how to address your problems. The problem with shops around my town is that the ones that advertise themselves as "lift experts" just throw blocks in and charge $400 and figure that the bling-bling tires and wheels will be sufficiently distracting to keep you from worrying about their sloppy work... :td:

Here's the info for the ORW locations near you:

San Diego (Main Store)
7915 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA 92111
Phone: 858-565-7792

El Cajon (East County Store)
425 North Marshall Avenue, El Cajon, CA 92020
Phone: 619-442-8689

Escondido (North County Store)
645 North Citracado Parkway, Escondido, CA 92029
Phone: 760-746-3193
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,253 Posts
Best manual you can get is the FSM...the pages you need are in the subscription section here, or if you plan to use it later, it's worth the $100+ to buy the actual FSM. I've used mine plenty. Both volumes are good, since the smaller volume shows all the SSTs, so you can rent/make/buy something similar if you need it.

The procedure is outlined very well in the FSM.

Talk to the SCT guys in your area, everybody over there is cool. They may be willing to help you wrench or walk you through the install...it's not a big job, just a few hours if all goes well, or a day if it's a little rough.

-Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
FSM = factory service manual

SST = special service tool...things like pullers, presses, other oddball single purpose tools meant to remove, install or tighten a single specific pulley, tensioner, bolt, etc...
Got it.....thanx for the glossary of terms Sean. :ts:

Hey, off topic--who did your rear fender cuts?

Also, where do you mount your spare tire? Stock location?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,253 Posts
Hey, off topic--who did your rear fender cuts?
I did :D. Procedure for sheetmetal is same as the glass I have, mark with blue masking tape, put a wide swath of beige tape over, cut on the appropriate side of the blue tape, finish with a flap wheel and hand sanding as necessary, then put protective door moulding over the cut edge. I actually cut the metal bedsides as a "test" first.
Also, where do you mount your spare tire? Stock location?
In the bed. I put four heavy duty recessed D-ring shackles in the bed, the spare gets strapped between them with the Bushranger on top and a tarp over it to keep out sun, dirt and prying eyes. You can see the tarp in the gallery shots from the last Canyonlands trip, there are a couple camp chairs lashed to the tiedown straps :p. Eventually the spare will ride similar to the stock location, it can drop down a good 4" or more from where the bed puts it, even without modifying the crossmembers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
With everyone not talking too highly about Fabtech, what do you recommend? I am only thinking of a 2.5-3" lift. All I have in the Springs though is Four Wheel or Predator Off Road. Where do I go to get parts or help? I have noticed that 4WP is kind of wingin' it. But haven't done a lot of business at Predator so don't know much about them. I don't get to Denver much at all though and would not have a clue where to go there. Any help at all would be appreciated.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top