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Just did my first oil change today and was in the process of switching over to Amsoil. They(Amsoil) recommend using their flush before transitioning(yes, even in a new engine). I checked the dipstick to ascertain the oil level(warm/level ground) in order to not have too much oil installed, and found the level to be overserviced about 8 ounces. Not such a huge deal, however; better to change it out now at 2000 miles rather than waiting longer. I guess someone squeezed the oil lever at the factory a little long. Has anyone else noticed this? Maybe the factory worker was suffering from a bad hangover.... my truck was built the Monday after Thanksgiving.:(
 

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My '07 Tacoma is over 1/4" above the topmost mark on dipstick. Looking at the dimensions of the upper part of the sump, I guesstamate about half a quart over.
 

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^ I always thought the oil was put in at the factory at a preset amount. Maybe it was done intentionally. 1/4 inch over was about where mine was as well.
 

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I find it difficult to read my Tacoma's oil stick. The oil always seems to be all over the place. This has never happened to me before with any other vehicle. Anybody else experience this? Any way to avoid it?
 

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We were just talking about this same issue over at nation. I thought I was nuts because I couldn't get a solid reading.
Factory Overserviced Oil
I find it difficult to read my Tacoma's oil stick. The oil always seems to be all over the place. This has never happened to me before with any other vehicle. Anybody else experience this? Any way to avoid it?
 

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I find it difficult to read my Tacoma's oil stick. The oil always seems to be all over the place. This has never happened to me before with any other vehicle. Anybody else experience this? Any way to avoid it?
Yeah, it's a pain, at least on the V6. This works for me. Pull the dipstick all the way out and wipe it clean. Stick it back in about 6 inches so most of it hangs out. Wait 5-10 minutes for all the oil in the tube to drain back down. Then push the dipstick all the way in with one thrust, pull it all the way out and read it. One side or the other usually will have a solid line of oil that is easy to read. The problem with the long tube is that oil seems to seep up into it and won't easily drain back down with the stick inserted. If you repeatedly pull and replace the dipstick it makes it worse because each time you pull it out you drag more oil back up into the tube.
 

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When I check mine it is almost always smeared all over one side, but the other side usually has a solid line. It is definitely a tough dip stick to read.
 

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I have similar problems when changing the oil. The best bet is to pull the stick out while you are draining the oil so the oil in the tube has plenty of chance to run out. I always let it drain until it comes to a very slow drip. Reinstall the plug, or close the fumito valve... Measure the oil you are putting in, and jot down the total, once you get it to the sweet spot, in your owners manual or elsewhere for future reference. I always try to get the oil level about 1/2 to 3/4. I've found during the final topping off the dip stick is hard to read. You basically have to wipe it off, give it a few minutes, then stick 'er back in. If you measure the exact amount of oil you put in you can avoid this slow process. I need to get a big measuring cup before my next change, because I buy my oil by the 5 quart jugs, which is a little cheaper then by the quarts. Its harder to keep track/measure by the big jugs.

Alway, always check your oil level before you pull out of a shop. Most oil servicemen are a bunch of underpaid a'holes that dont give a crap how much oil they put in. Case in point, I had Karl Malone in Albuquerque change the oil in my 89 MR2 once. First they didnt use the oil or filter I had set to the side for them (synthetic), so they used fossil oil. I noticed this after I got the car back home and picked up the bag. I thought whatever... later I went out to take the 2 for a spin and noticed a big oil spot underneath. I popped the hood, the engine bay, hood, engine, everything was coated in oil. Despite how much oil was on the ground and all over the engine bay the oil pan was still overfilled. I called the dealer, the manager said they would send a flat bed for the car. They fired the idiot punk, considering this wasnt his only screw up for that day...

This is just one reason why I do as much work to my own vehicles as I can. I'm not saying I'm perfect, but I pay attention to detail and what I'm doing. Might take me a little extra longer the first time to get it down, but at least its done right. The only things I havent done is paint, alignments, tear apart a transmission. Given some time, place to do it, and the proper tools I wouldnt mind learning how to do those things. I'd like to learn how to weld too.
 

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This is just one reason why I do as much work to my own vehicles as I can. I'm not saying I'm perfect, but I pay attention to detail and what I'm doing. Might take me a little extra longer the first time to get it down, but at least its done right. The only things I havent done is paint, alignments, tear apart a transmission. Given some time, place to do it, and the proper tools I wouldnt mind learning how to do those things. I'd like to learn how to weld too.
I agree completely... I've had similar expiences! I may not be a mechanic or trained as a mechanic but I'll be damned I am going to let a mechanic take me for a ride or one bad shop ruin my vehicle. Luckily, I have come across a few good mechanics (and have a cousin who is a mechanic) that are reasonably priced and are not idiots!!!! Still I do what I can--only because I will triple check what I do--It's my baby; I need too! :)

Based on a thread I JUST read... yes the oil dipstick on the new Taco's is very hard to read. I have chnaged oil on numerous vehicles and never had a problem like I did on my taco for reading the oil.

I should say... for being a computer geek, in the last year I have come to rely on nobody but myself for my vehicles (even with good mechanics to call). I personally have flushed the coolant, replaced the upper/lower radiator hoses, water pump, both outer tie-rod ends, the alternator, the serpentine belt, tires, and the fuel fill-pipe (it was leaking BIG time) on my wifes vehicle (130k+ miles). Pretty good considering all of that was a first (except for tires).
 

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Perhaps more oil is required to avoid oil starvation when loading/unloading from a transporter?
If that was the case, then it would be a problem as well for those of us that go up/down steep hills. It would be more of a design flaw then anything. I'd have to say this isnt a valid reason to over service the oil.
 

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Prob just a flaw in setting of the in-plant dispenser. Some engines could be 3 qts overfull and no damage results as long a crank does not whip air into the oil, so a little overfull is ok. Toyota might overfill a little since a little oil usage in normal during the first few thousand miles; the truck could use a half qt and still read full on stick. That would be better than a customer stating that they had to add oil between the first oil change.
 

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o/k folks, the time for panic is past.
There are never more than 2-3qts floating around in the actual components that need to be lubricated at a given moment. Everything else is 'reserved' waiting its turn to be 'cycled' thru.
A little over or a little under (ie-1/2qt) will not cause any serious problems.
 

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When checking the oil in my boat, you have to push the dipstick in slow because the tube is long and it becomes slightly pressurized cause the oil to push into the pan. Possibly this is the reason for eratic readings and if a tech does the oil service quickly adds more oil than required.:rolleyes:
Cheers Smurffjet
 

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I find it difficult to read my Tacoma's oil stick. The oil always seems to be all over the place. This has never happened to me before with any other vehicle. Anybody else experience this? Any way to avoid it?

Yes ... check it cold after the truck has sat all night. Works great. I've found the oil level only increases 1 or 2 mm on the stick when fully hot, so the difference is negligible.

On the over filling ... a little bit won't hurt. On my first oil change the level came out about 1/4 inch above FULL and I ran it with no problems. The factory might actually over fill slightly just to make sure the level stays up if the motor does burn a little during break-in.
 
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