Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm changing the front pads on my 05 Tundra, I've never changed breaks like these before. How do I compress the pistons? Any help is much appreciated! Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
U can use c-clamp or pistols grip Irwin type bar clamp or good size adjustable(channel lock) pliers. I like the Irwin pistol grip bar clamp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
U can use c-clamp or pistols grip Irwin type bar clamp or good size adjustable(channel lock) pliers. I like the Irwin pistol grip bar clamp
Yeah I've always used a c-clamp I've changed disc breaks and drums a hundred times on different vehicles but I've never worked on anything with the type of calipers on this 05 Tundra SR5...you can't use a clamp the way the calipers made, I got a pic below of the calipers that's on it. With the caliper on the rotor and pads on it's such a tight fit I ended up using a flathead screwdriver and pried on it and barely got it between the pad and rotor and used a wedge and kept beating on it until got all 4 pistons pushed in on each caliper. Took a while but I finally got old pads out and new ones in and the new pads barely fit it was so tight even with pistons pushed in completely. Afterwards I took it for a mile test drive to make sure breaks worked properly and it drove fine but when I got back it smelled like something burning and the rotors were scorching hot, I put water on it and it sizzled off instantly it was so hot, not sure what going on or why? Appreciate any help!
Vehicle Car Automotive design Motor vehicle Tire
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
Sounds to me like a stuck or seized piston. They should be difficult to open up but not to the point of needing to beat the hell out of them. Did you check to see if the pistons moved freely before putting the new pads on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds to me like a stuck or seized piston. They should be difficult to open up but not to the point of needing to beat the hell out of them. Did you check to see if the pistons moved freely before putting the new pads on?
Thanks for taking the time to reply and help out! I didn't check pistons before installing pads.... Inorder to do that I just need to push pistons back in, take the pads off and have someone hit breaks and the pistons should come out if they're good right? Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
Yup see if they go in smooth and even.
I still find it really odd you had to beat a wedge in there to open them up. Hopefully that didnt cause some kind of damage or they werent already seized.
 

·
Registered
2012 Tundra Crewmax Limited
Joined
·
33 Posts
I used something like this:
LAJIAOZ Stainless Steel Car Brake Caliper Press Tool, Compressor Brake Wrench Can 360 Degree Ratchet Swing for Car Brake Repair and Replace
Searching that on Amazon should link it. Never found anything better on any vehicle. My 2nd Tundra and at least 6 sets of front pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I leave the old pads in and use channel locks to squeeze on the pad top steel humps. Stick a screwdriver or whatever as a wedge to hold the pistons back when to do the other side. Too easy.
 

·
Registered
2012 Tundra Crewmax Limited
Joined
·
33 Posts
I leave the old pads in and use channel locks to squeeze on the pad top steel humps. Stick a screwdriver or whatever as a wedge to hold the pistons back when to do the other side. Too easy.
I had a stuck piston and it would not allow me to put any pressure on one side once I started to separate the pads. Trust me, the tool I mentioned above will save you a ton of time and possible damage, maybe even from a screwdriver stab to your hand.

There is also a threaded screw hold in the brake rotors to pull them off easily if changing the rotors or resurfacing them. It just uses a metric bolt to drive into it. Not sure the size, but easy to see once you find the hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I'm changing the front pads on my 05 Tundra, I've never changed breaks like these before. How do I compress the pistons? Any help is much appreciated! Thanks!!
Good job putting a photo of the caliper up. They look like the "new" at 2002 HD calipers. I used to be a Harley dealership Tech. At about 2002 they put out new calipers that you couldn't use c-clamps to compress the piston. What we did was get some stiff blade scrapers (putty knives) to go between the pad and the rotor. We worked them to press the piston back.
I am no longer a HD mechanic so I don't know what they use now. But that's how we did it in the shop then. Get the thin blade but stiff, not too much flex, putty knives. Seized pistons are not common, but do happen. I don't think that's the case. Just pry 'em, but try to do it evenly so you don't wedge the piston crooked in the bore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Thanks for taking the time to reply and help out! I didn't check pistons before installing pads.... Inorder to do that I just need to push pistons back in, take the pads off and have someone hit breaks and the pistons should come out if they're good right? Thanks again!
Dont use hydraulics to pop the pistons out. If you're changing pistons, take the caliper off, put it on the work bench, put a pad of shop rags between the pistons and give it some compressed air. safer and cleaner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Also, anytime you are pressing caliper pistons back, take the reservoir cap off, put something under it to catch any fluid back flow. Don't know about DOT 5, but DOT 3&4 peals paint
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
U can use c-clamp or pistols grip Irwin type bar clamp or good size adjustable(channel lock) pliers. I like the Irwin pistol grip bar clamp
It's never happened to me, but I've read that forcing the fluid back this way can damage the ABS sensor. Since reading that, I open the bleeder valve. put a hose on it, and put the other end of the hose into an empty jar. That way the fluid is simply forced out of the caliper and not back through the entire hydraulic system.
If this is not necessary, or it this is the wrong thing to do, please let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
I have seen a guy wreck the ABS actuator but how he did it was use an impact gun, I was watching him do it. It was a buddy of mine years ago working on his moms car. He had one of those threaded rod type tools and rather than using a wrench to slowly compress the piston back into place the gun rammed the piston but with such force he damaged the internals of the actuator, he did end up needing to buy a new actuator. So my guess is compressing the piston is fine as long as you do it slowly and dont use power tools.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top