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I found this information (see below) that may help explain why Toyota did this. I still don't know if I like the idea, but I guess we better get used to it. And I think oil changes are going to get messier again, and I don't care if it does come with a drain tube. According to this bulletin one of the advantages of the cartridge filter is that it's usually located on the top or side of the engine, but not so with the Toyota. Good luck to those with a skid plate.


[SIZE=+2]Technical Service Bulletin 00-2[/SIZE]
[FONT=Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, san-serif]PRINT VERSION [/FONT]​
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]New Generation Cartridge Style Oil Filters[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Prior to the mid 1950's virtually all engine oil filters were of the cartridge style. Changing the oil filter was a very messy job that could result in a good deal of oil leakage both in and around the area of the housing and on the mechanic or technician. The cartridge housing had to be thoroughly cleaned, which in some cases required removal of the housing. On many applications there were various internal housing components that also had to be cleaned and properly positioned when installing the new cartridge. Due to variations in housing designs, the installation of the filter and proper placement of the housing sealing gasket also required various installation techniques.[/FONT]​

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The introduction of the spin-on filter in the mid 50's solved many of the cartridge filter installation problems. It made the changing of the oil and filter more user friendly and allowed many vehicle owners to assume the responsibility of changing their own oil and filters. However, changing a spin-on oil filter today may still result in oil leakage to the surrounding area and onto the servicing technician.[/FONT]​

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Space has become a premium in the engine compartment of today's vehicles. As a result the oil filter can be very difficult to locate and change. In the late 1980's European original equipment manufacturers began reverting back to the cartridge style oil filter. We see this same trend beginning to appear in our North American produced vehicles.[/FONT]​

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]This change from a spin-on filter to the new cartridge filter offers several advantages. The first and most obvious is filter disposal. The disposal cost of a cartridge filter is far less than that of a spin-on filter. This is also an attempt by the individual OE manufacturers to establish standardized oil filter cartridge sizes, thereby eliminating the number of different part numbers required to service a particular brand of vehicle. The new cartridge filter housing will also be located on the top or side of the engine compartment making them accessible from above without the need to raise the vehicle.[/FONT]​

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Today's cartridge style filter housings are designed with a screw on top cap and a single housing sealing gasket. The housings are also self draining enabling the filter housing to be drained back into the engine prior to the filter change-out. After the housing is drained the housing top is then unscrewed and the used filter cartridge and housing sealing gasket removed without any unnecessary oil leakage. The new filter is then installed in the housing or fitted to the housing cap. The new sealing gasket is installed and the housing cap tightened per installation instructions. The used engine oil is then drained from the crankcase. New oil is added and the engine started to check for proper oil pressure or any possible oil leakage. The service is now complete.[/FONT]​

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]There is also a variation to the complete cartridge replacement. The same style of housing is used but instead of replacing the complete cartridge only the used pleated paper media pack and sealing gasket are replaced. The media pack end caps as we know them today would be reusable and only the paper pack itself would be replaced.[/FONT]
The cartridge style filter is back and will be the oil filter configuration of the future.



For additional information, contact:
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Filter Manufacturers Council[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]P.O. Box 13966[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3966[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Phone: 919/406-8817 Fax: 919/406-1306[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Filter Council[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Administered by Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association[/FONT]​
 

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Slim availability of filters

Good luck to those of you who need an oil change soon. Toyota has over 3000 of these on backorder. Basically, a handful of dealerships have them currently and that's it.

I've got 3600miles on my 5.7 and in need of a change. 8 dealerships today told me "sorry".:td: :td: :td:

BOOO to Toyota for not being prepared for this!:td: :td: :td:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: Slim availability of filters

Good luck to those of you who need an oil change soon. Toyota has over 3000 of these on backorder. Basically, a handful of dealerships have them currently and that's it.

I've got 3600miles on my 5.7 and in need of a change. 8 dealerships today told me "sorry".:td: :td: :td:

BOOO to Toyota for not being prepared for this!:td: :td: :td:
3,000 on backorder? Seems like they should have 300,000 on back order. Didn't Toyota say it expected to sell 200,000 trucks in 2007? Even if they fall short of that they are still gonna need a chit load of oil filters! :(
 

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That's kinda what I was thinking. Two different dealerships gave me the same backorder figures (3000 and some change). Only 82 were slated for delivery to Cincinnati next week ( the closest pt to my KY dealers).

Blows my mind.:confused:
 

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Cartridge filters are more efficient and easier to replace. Stop being worried about this. They also allow more flow, look at the thing, thats obvious to see.
 

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I've swapped out the cartridge filters on my VW and Audi's and thought it was great. No mess and easy to reach. With a cheap top-sider (oil extractor) you could do the entire LOF without getting underneath. Of course if Toyota didn't mount the cartridge somewhere easy to get....might be more difficult I dunno.
 

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I guess being at the largest dealer in the SE has its perks:tu: . I'll tell the parts mgr at Clarksville that there are some available.
 

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Been drooling over the new Tundra for a while now and, while I wait for my pile of loose change to grow, I've been hanging out here learning what I can from you all.
I believe the oil filter used should be the largest one that fits. My Dodge came with a Mopar spin-on filter that was about 3" long, and I immediately replaced it with a WIX filter that is about 7" long, available from my local auto parts store. This more that doubled the filter medium available, as well as adding about a quart to the oil capacity.

This seems an excellent opportunity for an aftermarket application, either for a filter relocation kit, or an adapter that would permit the owner to use the filter of choice.
 

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[...]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The housings are also self draining enabling the filter housing to be drained back into the engine prior to the filter change-out. After the housing is drained the housing top is then unscrewed and the used filter cartridge and housing sealing gasket removed without any unnecessary oil leakage.

[...]
[/FONT]​
Tell me how this doesn't put some of what the filter has removed back into the engine. This doesn't square with what I like about spin-on filters, namely that, with a self-contained filter, what is trapped by the filter is removed with the filter.
 

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Tell me how this doesn't put some of what the filter has removed back into the engine. This doesn't square with what I like about spin-on filters, namely that, with a self-contained filter, what is trapped by the filter is removed with the filter.​
It would drain from the "return to motor" side of the filter.
But, Tundra does not work that way, you drain the housing to a disposal pan before removing.
 

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It would drain from the "return to motor" side of the filter.
But, Tundra does not work that way, you drain the housing to a disposal pan before removing.
Thanks!

There's nothing quite like a straight answer to a straight question, is there?
 
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