Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
what is funny about those guys is they dont realize someone played with the numbers. LMAO.. they are really morons.. how does a loaded f150 stop faster than an unloaded one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
what is funny about those guys is they dont realize someone played with the numbers. LMAO.. they are really morons.. how does a loaded f150 stop faster than an unloaded one?
Excellent point, I love it. Just goes to show you that people will believe whatever they read if it conforms to their beliefs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
:tu: I second that. Some people are born without the ability to make there own educated decisions. Do the research and you will find the truth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
It's because the truck couldn't get up to speed loaded up:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,108 Posts
One poster on BlueOval made the comment that the 5.7 was tied to mandatory upgrade options and trim pkg's, this is of course untrue. Now Ford does sell stripped full crew cabs in F-250 level and up with vinyl floor/seats no power windows, ect, but very very few, and I don't think the F-150 comes as a full stripper in crew cab configuration. Either way the XLT and above trim levels are what most buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
While you guys are laughing, Ford uses an apportioning valve in the brake system. The valve senses load to the rear rotors. When the truck is empty, there is very little braking action with the rear brakes. When loaded the valve will send more brake pressure to the rear rotors resulting in shorter stops when loaded. So yes the Ford will stop shorter when loaded due to more equalized braking from the rear brakes. Make fun of Ford all you want and they definitely give you lots to work with but the brakes are good. That is, as long as you like your front wheels brown from brake dust- ever notice? Ever ride in one that the rotors weren't warped?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,108 Posts
Most every vehicle on the road uses a proportioning valve, most Toyota trucks and other import models use in addition an ajustable height sensing valve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
While you guys are laughing, Ford uses an apportioning valve in the brake system. The valve senses load to the rear rotors. When the truck is empty, there is very little braking action with the rear brakes. When loaded the valve will send more brake pressure to the rear rotors resulting in shorter stops when loaded. So yes the Ford will stop shorter when loaded due to more equalized braking from the rear brakes. Make fun of Ford all you want and they definitely give you lots to work with but the brakes are good. That is, as long as you like your front wheels brown from brake dust- ever notice? Ever ride in one that the rotors weren't warped?
Every Ford truck I owned braked ok, but like you mentioned the rotors were quickly warped and had a couple of calipers completely seize up while driving!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
Ford boys are the LAST people to talk about brakes!! All the brakes on my last 5 Fords have been complete [email protected] and don't stop worth $h1t.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
While you guys are laughing, Ford uses an apportioning valve in the brake system. The valve senses load to the rear rotors. When the truck is empty, there is very little braking action with the rear brakes. When loaded the valve will send more brake pressure to the rear rotors resulting in shorter stops when loaded. So yes the Ford will stop shorter when loaded due to more equalized braking from the rear brakes. Make fun of Ford all you want and they definitely give you lots to work with but the brakes are good. That is, as long as you like your front wheels brown from brake dust- ever notice? Ever ride in one that the rotors weren't warped?
Is there any truck/SUV that doesn't have a load sensing proportioning valve anymore? Well, the Tundra has Electronic Brake Force Distribution (EBFD), which is better than a simple/dumb proportioning valve. Either system should attempt to optimize brake force depending on the load, if it makes a loaded rig stop faster than an unloaded rig it is either malfunctioning, or very poorly designed. It should not sacrifice unloaded stopping for loaded stopping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Probably reason for equal braking distance was the Tundra was moving alot faster!
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top