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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone help, please.
My 2002 Tundra has only 21,000 on the clock, but already the brakes were juddering. I found the problem to be that winter salt had badly corroded the brake caliper parts. All I have to do is remove the brake pads and clean the rust away! However, the two steel pins that hold the brake pads in the calipers are firmly rusted into the calipers. I have tried hammering. I have tried WD40, waiting and hammering. Nothing seems to shift these darn pins.
Any suggestions?
Thanks

giles..
 

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First off go buy some new pins.
Trying to twist them usually works better then hammering on them. If you beat on them you will spread the pin like a rivet and it will acutely get tighter in the hole. Grab it with a pair of vise grips and try to loosed them by twisting the pin back and forth. If all else fails cut the pin in haft and try each end.
Lube the new pins with silicon brake grease when your reinstall them
Bad news, rusted brake pins won't cause a pedal pulsation. Could be rust on the rotors, if this is the case it's usually best to replace them.
Mike
 

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the best rust remover/freeing stuck rusty parts is PB Blaster. The stuff works great!!!!!!!!!!get it @ autozone/advance/walmart good stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice. I have bought some PB Blaster (and ordered something called AeroKroil, which is also supposed to be good at freeing parts) I'm going to squirt a little of either at the pins which are only rusted in at the far end (the end furthest from the flattened head), and try the twisting technique. I think the reason the brakes were juddering was because one of the pads was also rusted and not moving towards the disc when I braked, this caused the disc to deflect slightly due to pressure from the moveable pad. Can't wait to replace the pins with nice new shiny ones slick with just a dab of silicone grease!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well I have been trying for a week now to try to loosen these rusted-in brake pad holding pins. Every day I give them a little spray with PB Blaster, and then try to wiggle them loose using vise grips. These suckers are really firmly in there! I have some Aero Kroil coming in the mail, and I will try that when it arrives, but I can't think it is going to be significantly better than the other stuff. I can't apply a torch without cooking the brake fluid and various seals, but I do have access to liquid nitrogen, and I was wondering if I froze the assembly down it might just loosen things enough to allow the penetrating oil in to do its job. Anyone any other ideas? I really hate to take it to the dealers, or have to buy a whole new set of calipers. Thanks. Giles..
 

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Tap the ends of the pins with a punch.
 

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Yeah, I do...find a birthday cake candle and propane torch. Heat the area hot enough to melt the wax in the pin hole. Then tap out the pin. Try not to heat the rubber dust covers for the caliper piston(s). Don't ask how this works, I didn't beleive either until I had tried it.
Doug
 

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If you can get the pins to rotate they will come out. The problem is the end you taped on may be a bit mushroomed. Cut the pins in the middle with a hack saw blade and then try pull them out from the ends.
Or better yet if you can cut the ends off the pins also, you can punch them through pretty easily without having to push a lot of the rusty pin through the hole.
Be careful that the penetrating oils you are using are not running down on the dust boots. These lubricants can swell the rubber seals.
I would stay away from heat now that you have soaked everything. These penetrating oils are very flammable, even if they appear to have dried up. So be careful with this idea.
I'm afraid you going to have to get tough with it. Man over metal.....and rust!
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #9
:ts: I have to say (with some shame) that I ended up taking the truck to the local Toyota dealers and let them deal with it. I tried pretty well everything I could (except the birthday candle trick - I didn't get to that, but thanks). The dealer ended up having to remove the calipers and then drilling the old pins out. They also fitted new discs, so now I am $600 lighter! Apparently the reason is the pre-treatment salt (potassium chloride) they have started using here to battle the winter snows. It is considerably more aggressive than the old sodium chloride.
My next job now, of course, is to get to the rear drum brakes. Hopefully they are not too rusted up. However, I understand you can force these off by screwing a couple of bolts into holes pre-tapped in the drums. Anyone know what size (and thread) these holes are so I can just go buy the bolts and have them at hand when I start? (I have a 2002 V-8 four door Tundra)
Again, Thanks guy's for all the advice. My advice? Hose the darn salt off after every winter trip (always assuming the water isn't frozen in the hose pipe!)
Giles..
 

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Crap, Giles when you brought up road treatments I only then looked to see that your are here in Cincinnati. I would have helped you with this. I'm sorry I didn't see that.
They are right, in this area we have always had to deal with the way they so liberally coat the roads with corrosive mixers every time a snow flurry happens. It's waste full government and turns are vehicle to rust buckets.
This is one reason when I get a vehicle, (even our 6 month old Tucson) I take apart the brakes and coat some parts with silicone brake grease and paint some other part. I know from doing brakes around here for years what happened under a vehicle.
Mike
 

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I lived in Dayton for a while, four years actually.

Never had a problem with the pins in the brakes, but my rotors are rust-frozen to the hubs...makes for very brake-consciencious driving.

Toyota doesn't add anything to their fasteners during assembly other than thread lock...your alignment cams will eventually sieze as well.

In that sort of corrosive environment the best thing you can do is get something like Green Grease (I know, I keep caning that stuff, it's better than Mobil-1 tho) and put a coating on everything you want to be able to move later (where appropriate, anyway). Same goes for rubber parts as well...303 Aerospace Protectant worked very well in Ohio. Make sure you're using thread lock and torquing everything to the FSM spec. As long as that's all the case, you'll be ok even with the corrosive environment...just rinse the truck a lot in winter, and if you notice rust spots clean the loose rust, rough the surface, and throw on Rustoleum or POR-15.

-Sean
 

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I just replaced the pads...on the drivers side so far...on my 2002 sequoia. First I tried the hammer and punch. That ended up mushrooming the end of the pin.
Eventually I used an air hammer and sheared the pins off from the inside of the caliper. The pads came out with the sheared middle portion of the pin.
Then I had to take off the caliper and used the hammer and punch to knock out the outer flanged piece of the pin.
The other end that I mushroomed would not budge one bit with the hammer and punch. I figured I wedged it in there pretty good.
I ended up drilling through the pins with a bit slightly smaller than the pins. Then I used the punch and the pins FINALLY came out.
Of course this was on a Saturday and the Toyota parts is closed until Mon... Hopefully the passengers side will be about 4 hours less work:shockeda:
 

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I lived in Dayton for a while, four years actually.

Never had a problem with the pins in the brakes, but my rotors are rust-frozen to the hubs...makes for very brake-consciencious driving.

Toyota doesn't add anything to their fasteners during assembly other than thread lock...your alignment cams will eventually sieze as well.

In that sort of corrosive environment the best thing you can do is get something like Green Grease (I know, I keep caning that stuff, it's better than Mobil-1 tho) and put a coating on everything you want to be able to move later (where appropriate, anyway). Same goes for rubber parts as well...303 Aerospace Protectant worked very well in Ohio. Make sure you're using thread lock and torquing everything to the FSM spec. As long as that's all the case, you'll be ok even with the corrosive environment...just rinse the truck a lot in winter, and if you notice rust spots clean the loose rust, rough the surface, and throw on Rustoleum or POR-15.


-Sean
Sean,
After reading that you used this POR-15 a couple of years ago I started to read up on it and was impressed with it so much I bought some with the intention of using it on my truck. Well I was having problems with my lawn tractor collecting grass on the bottom of the deck which caused it to rust, so I took it off and cleaned down to metal and brushed on two coats of POR-15 and now the grass dose not stick as bad and the deck will not rust and even rocks can nock this stuff off the deck surface. So then I bought one of those 15 dollar spray guns from Harbor freight and cleaned up my truck frame and started to paint it up. Well I got most of it done about 2/3's anyway and ran out of POR-15 and farted around and winter came before the POR did. Next spring the part I did not spray was coated with rust the rest was nice and black. So I have finished the rest that I can get to and some that you have to use a small brush on.
One point to make here where the POR come in contact with suns UV light you must coat it with a top coat of a blocking paint some thing of good quailty . I used meduim range black spray can paint and all is fine this stuff works. I painted the gas line that comes into my house 3yrs ago then coated it with cheap Walmart spray paint and no rust at all on it. Before I had to brush and repaint every year.
Kevin
 

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I just had to replace my calipers and rotors due to the rust that rendered them inoperable. I was having a conversation with the local Toyota dealer parts guy and he said it was the new type of compounds they are using to salt the roads that are ruining cars.

I'm having a huge issue right now trying to get the top nut off my rear shocks. The nut is completely seized on the shaft and will not budge. I tried PB blaster, that did nothing. I took my hand grinder and cut some grooves in the shaft to get the vice grips to have something to hold onto while I tried turning the nut. Finally, the nut/shaft broke off. Geez. Now I'm having the same problem with the driver side shock. That damn thing is on there good, and there is no room to work.
 

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Hi,

I read all your posts. I decided to solve this problem. My pins were solidly rusted from the regular salt up north. I wrote a short procedure in 2003 but now my procedure has everything but a shop light in it. This is a short summary of what to do that worked for me in 5 minutes on the Never-Seez'ed pins on one side and 10 minutes on the pins that were not coated.

Critical parts list for the D-I-Y person trying to remove rusted Toyota brake pins.

Craftsman # 9 18687 4-piece air chisel set that cost about $32. You want the pin punch tool.
Craftsman or Chicago Pneumatics air chisel for use with the above set or a package deal.
*Cut the shaft off one of the tools you don't want with a hacksaw about one inch from the raised ridge portion of the tool.
*Grind the end flat. Do not taper or chamfer. You have the tapered pin punch in the above set for that.

Never-Seez(Registered), 1 pound can or less, Bostik Chemical Group, Emhart, Broadview, Ill, 60153. Maximum temperature is 2000 degrees F. Do your brakes get that hot?

Craftsman black pin punch, 5 inches long, 3/16 inch, #9-42885.
Craftsman black pin punch 5.5 inches long, 1/4 inch, #9-42886.

Liquid Wrench, not a spray.

2 brake pin sets for the front brakes. Auto Zone, $8 each. Or buy two Carlson # 14108 sets.
(The black and orange Carlson box says, "An International Brake Industries(r) Company". Carlson subsidiary is in LIMA, OHIO.)

I wrote a complete very detailed procedure to remove the pins and pads. This is the meat of my idea. Do you really think a mechanic spends more than a few minutes on removing these pins? That idea led me to this short summary procedure.

Turn the steering wheel so you can better access the back of the pins. Using the blunt tool you made, SQUARELY hit the brake pin on the flared end first with a quarter second blast from the air chisel. Remove the clevis spring wire system holding the pins in place in the back. Next, squarely hit the clevis end of the brake pin on the backside of the caliper. It will move. Go as far as you dare. Switch to the air powered tapered pin punch to drive the pin into the recess of the caliper pin hole where it was frozen up. Switch to a hammer and your manual black pin punch. Hammer the pin the rest of the way out. Apply lubricant as needed. The pins will come out with little trouble. I mushroomed one of the pins and collapsed the wire hole on one where I didn't use Never-Seez last time. The tapered air chisel punch drove it through into the caliper enough to switch to the hammer.

Remove both pins and note how the anti-rattle spring curls around the pins. The curved arch always goes down on either side on a 1999 Tacoma truck

Never-Seez (Register Trademark) Procedure.
You can do this anytime before or after you remove the old pads. Using the tip of a pin or a small screwdriver, dip it into NEVER-SEEZ and coat the inside of the pin guide holes in the caliper castings in the front and back of the caliper and at the top and bottom pin locations.

Once you get the pads and shims greased and installed, you are ready to put the Never-Seez coated pins in. Mount the anti-rattle spring as you do the following. The spring arch goes down. Coat the whole pin with Never-Seez. You can use brake grease on the MIDDLE of the pins, if you want after installation. It depends on how bad the rust was on your pins. Push the new pins into the first casting and through the first set of pads, shims, and the rattle arch spring. Coat the clevis pin hole end with N-S while twisting the pin. Coat the flared end and push the pin all the way into the caliper. This should completely coat the caliper casting holes with anti-seize Never-Seez or your silicone brake grease. The N-S will make it easy to remove the pins next time. You WILL become a believer in Never-Seez. You can put some brake grease on the middle of the pins if you like to prevent rusting where the pads ride on the pins or the stainless steel spring anti-rattle ends. This can be hard to do and not get it on the pads. Be creative.

There’s no hocus-pocus black magic in this summary procedure. Get the right tools and this is an easy brake job to do.

Disclaimer: I do not guarantee that this will work on your truck. I have no way of knowing your skill level, your truck, or the condition of your calipers. The blunt and tapered pin punch trick worked on the rusted brake pins for me and that's the main point. You assume all risks. If you don't understand all this or don't have all these critical tools, then let your dealer or your mechanic do the job.

HTH,

Rusty Pin
 

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from freds quote above: the local Toyota dealer parts guy and he said it was the new type of compounds they are using to salt the roads that are ruining cars.


why is it toyota frames & brake calipers rust.
i don't have salt or corrosives on my roads
i live in the south & they r rusted
i look at gm & ford calipers everywhere i go & i
haven't seen any rust
i look at 2010 toyotas & no rust
i have never had calipers to rust before , is anyone else
thet lives in the south having this problem.

do u think toyota has another recall coming??

mike
2007 tundra 60k miles, rust since 20k
 

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2008 Tundra; I think the front brake pads were never changed. Nov. 2015 I changed them. The pins were completely seized. Used PB blaster and a hammer with drift pin. After they came out, I had to sand them and file the ends, they were extremely pitted and corroded. This design might seem "great and new" but it SUCKS. The pins are too small and long to be durable and they corrode too easily. Unless you live in the desert; it's not a helpful design.
 

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Live in Pittsburgh, so lots of corrosion. I used a wire brush, lots of WD-40, and an air impact hammer ($15 at Harbor Freight). If it won't come all the way out, work it back and forth with the air hammer, brushing and lubing each time.
 
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