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I am having a garage built next month. Driving around town I see many people can not fit their pickup trucks and SUVs into them--they park them outside. But I want to park my 2008 Tundra DC inside with my wife's car.

I'm thinking of 26' wide garage with two 9'H x 8'W roll up doors.

What is a good size, and will the doors be a problem (height and width)?

Thanks for your help.:)
 

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When it comes to garages I am a firm believer in bigger is better. I would go with 9' wide doors. It gives extra clearance for the mirrors. I've got a 16' and 9' door and would have gone wider if I could. Your 9' height is plenty. And I would go at least 24' deep so you can get around your truck with the door closed.

Jim
 

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Thank you. I'll fax the builder and see the price differential. One thing is for sure, I don't want to build it too small.
 

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Hey man, congrats on the garage! THAT is man's best friend, lol:p

I specialize in garage plans, I have drawn up several for my family and a few friends. I'll give you some pointers.

People usually make 2 mistakes when building a garage: Making the doors too narrow and building it too small.

Most standard doors are 7' high. 9' is WAY too high for residential use. Go with either 7' or 8' high, depending on whether you will have an 8' or 9' ceiling.

8' wide is WAY too narrow. Maybe not for a Yaris, but definitely for anything bigger. Get 10' wide doors! Believe me, you will be glad you did. 9' wide are okay for cars, but not full-size trucks. Even with 10' doors, you will only have a foot or so to spare on either side.

If I were you, I'd build it at least 24' deep and 28' wide. Maybe even 26' by 30' to accomodate a workbench on the back wall and more space around the cars.

Good Luck!
 

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Thank you. I'll fax the builder and see the price differential. One thing is for sure, I don't want to build it too small.
Hmmmm..........Detroit Burrrrr:eek: .....you might want to have a heater put in too:tu: LOL

Definitely go bigger, especially in length so you have some work room. Seems once the garage gets built more "things' seem to find their way to the garage.
 

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My dad put (H)9ft x (W)18ft doors on the garage of his retirement home in northern WI. BIG PLUS. He has 12ft ceilings in the garage and that makes it really easy to hang his topper from the ceiling on a rack. We just back the truck under it and lower it onto the bed of the truck for easy on/off. I am planning to build in the next two years and 9ft high doors are a must IMHO. I already have some plans in mind, but the garage will be no smaller than 28x40 for 3 vehicles, toys, and workspace. I will definetly have 12ft ceilings also. I thought dad was crazy at first, but a wise use of ceiling space for storage looks very intelligent and back saving.......Did I mention he has the 06 DC Limited. Looks sharp, but I am have the 07 CM on order. My wife says it's not a competition......WHATEVER!!:tu: :devil:
 

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You definitely want 9' wide doors, and if you have towing mirrors, you'll stlll have to fold them in.
 

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We put a garage addition on our house a few years back, squared up an L-shaped house, which pretty much dictated the dimensions, except the first floor of the addition we extended the face of the garage out an extra 3 feet for addional garage dept. 9 ft doors really are the minimum for a full sized truck, and at least for my 05 F-150, 7 ft height worked, hopefully they'll work for the Tundra when I get it. But depth is another issue, my garage is only apprx. 19 ft deep, and before the new truck arrives I'll have to disassemble part of the back wall and move it back about 3", not a job I really am looking forward too, but it can (and will) be done to accomodate a DC. The only other option is what I accepted with the Ford, regular cab, short box, but I've done that once and don't want to go back there. In short, minimum garage: 24 wide, 24 deep (24 width will give you a little storage space) with at least 9 ft wide doors (assuming 2 separate doors).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow, these are great commnets, I'm taking notes!:tu:
 

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A construction friend helped me build my 24 x 24 garage addition. It had 12' ceilings, and a 9' x 14' commercial grade insulated door. That door made bringing my Tundra AC with a cap and thule racks or my snowmobile trailer no problem. I had to go with 12' high ceilings to match an unusually high existing side entrance, but it worked out really, really well. The design I did matched the house esthetics (contempory) & the guys I had frame it worked for a large commercial contractor and did weekend side jobs to fund their hunting trips, and went over everything with me before breaking ground. Those guys rocked!!! They suggested, and am glad they did, 36" entrance doors front and rear so I wouldn't have use the garage door everytime I wanted to go in and out. Another good friend who owns a plumbing business helped me put radiant heat in the floor which is awesome in the winter & takes up no valuable floor space. Finally wrap up was insulation, 4' plywood around the inside lower perimeter and sheetrocking the rest. Also outlets everywhere including the ceiling for hanging shop lights and a water spigot for cleaning up brushes, sleds etc. in the wintertime.

As others have mentioned, space goes quickly so go as big as you can go, I would have if my lot would have allowed it. Enjoy your new garage :tu:
 

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I agree with whats posted above, go with a big garage. A 30'x20' isn;t much more money than a 20'x20'. I have a 22'x22', and I would kill for a 36'x24'.
 

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xedge

What is the sheeting below the tubing for, reflecting the heat up?
 

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My garage is 22' deep, 24' wide, 11' high with an 8' high, 18' wide roll up door. Still not near big enough. Build it as deep, wide and high as possible with at least an 8' high door. If possible, in addittion to making room for your shop area make some space for a fridge, sofa and big screen tv. You'll ALMOST never regret it. Don't forget to run in a natural gas line for your space heater.
 

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Agree with most of the above. My garage is pretty big, about 1100 sq. ft, but the door is only 9' wide x 7' high. This is bigger than some garage doors but backing the Tundra in is like threading a needle. The Tundra is 79.9" or 6.7' wide at the body. Add another 12" for each mirror and you get 8.7' wide, or only 4" of total clearance on a 9' wide garage door.

Sure, you can retract or fold in the mirrors to give yourself some more room but this makes it harder and less safe to back in or out of the garage. Even with the mirrors folded in they still take up about 6" so you only gain another foot or so at the most. If you are like me then there are times when you only want to pull partially in and then get out of your truck. If your truck doors are close to the garage door then you need almost 2' on each side to get in and out safely.

When installing some mods recently I left the front end of the truck sticking outside but it was tough to get out without dinging the doors, and it was a tight squeeze going in or out of the garage with tools in hand.

So I highly recommend getting at least one big double-width door for the Tundra. Or better yet build a ramp into your living room and just park it inside. :)
 

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When I had my garage built in 1984, I did not have a great deal of money but I knew not to make it small. So I had it built as nothing but a shell, 30' wide by 50' deep, with a nine foot high ceiling and two 8' high by 10' wide doors. I wired and plumbed it myself, then insulated it and covered the walls and ceiling with Homasote rather than drywall for sound deadening and insulation reasons. The walls are 2 x 6 rather than 2 x 4 so that I could cram more insulation in it. Since I live in western PA, the ground is not level, and roughly a third to half of the garage is below grade. With the insulation, it won't go below about 49° even with the heat off in the winter regardless of outdoor temperature. And in the summer, it doesn't go above about 72° even without the A/C on (I do have an A/C unit so that if I'm working on something I don't sweat much).

After 23 years I still am happy with the size and layout of the garage. It easily holds a pickup and two cars (my wife has her own garage attached to the house), four motorcycles, a commercial mower, small garden tractor, two huge shelving units, workbench, welder, two tire changers, spin balancer, large compressor, and so on, and leaves an open bay so that I can work on another vehicle without moving anything.

I think it's important to give careful consideration to ceiling height. Although a 12' ceiling is probably an absolute minimum if you plan to install a lift, I have found 9' to be optimal for my purposes. It allows an 8' overhead door, which you need if you have a lifted pickup (and probably for many of the new pickups), yet doesn't make it difficult to heat. With a 12' ceiling, a whole lot of your heat will sit in the top four or five feet of the air space, costing you money and doing you no good for comfort.

And the comments about the wider (10') overhead doors are right on the money. The most common residential doors are 9' and are barely wide enough for a Tundra. The 10' door allows a bit of wiggle room so that you can park the pickup offset to the side just a bit, so that you can pull something else (mower, say) out without moving the pickup.

Make sure to install a lot of light. I have about 20 8' long single tube fluorescent fixtures, plus more above the bench, and it's just about right so that I can wax a car and actually see what I'm doing. Another consideration is to make sure you have phone and cable lines (well, maybe CAT 5 lines; phone lines may be pointless nowadays) run to wherever you might want them. Easy before insulation goes in and difficult afterward.

I recommend running a cold water line in so that you can have a utility sink. A 10-gallon water heater is nice, too, sitting right next to the sink. Then the water is hot right away, and there's plenty for washing the truck.
 

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Drawing plans for several years and dealing with homeowners and now building a house ourselves - the best thing I ever found to do was meaure your vehicles and out them in a scaled drawing. If this seems a bit much then just go big :)

Seriously, I would take the layout of your home into consideration, do you want to be able to walk around all sides of your vehicles? Is there going to be a workbench in there? Tool storage? Shelving with oil, filters etc? Deed freeze? Extra ref? Where are the steps located going into the house? Make sure there's plenty of room around those steps to walk b/t the vehicle and them as they will take up more space than you think. By the steps is usually where shoes accumulate. All these things need to be thought about and planned for upfront. Oh if you're doing 2 doors (which I would) I would space them apart from each other as much as you can - and still have it to your liking on the outer appearance - fewer door dings.

Just what I've ran into over the years and seen 1st hand...Hope this helps...
 

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I'm in the process of getting permits for a 30x56 steel bldg I'll be putting up...:tu:

After the RV/Trailer & room for the racecar/support equip tools/shop etc..

I hope there's room for the Tundra...:eek:

Did I mention part of the bldg will be a therapy room for my 3 yr old son...
 

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xedge

What is the sheeting below the tubing for, reflecting the heat up?
It helps retain the heat, it gives you something to attach the plastic staples too. Made by Dow, its tongue and groove heavy density styrofoam ridgid/utility board rated 15 psi. Expensive, I remember that. It goes on top of a sheet of plastic, then the board, then you make your tubing runs (mine had 3 runs). Also around the bottom walls we siliconed 1/2 reflective board. That keeps the heat from escaping too. We hammer drilled 6 small holes into the existing foundation to bring the 3 runs into the existing heating system. Pretty slick. We did all of it except the hook up in literally less than 2 hrs.
 
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