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Discussion Starter #1
Ive installed a ICON stage II setup which involves front coilovers, rear 3 leaf pack, and rear shocks. I also have TC control arms, TC steering bushing kit, and diff drop as well.

The front coilovers are set from the factory at 2" of lift. THe 3 leaf raises the back 1". Ive raised the BPV one inch as well.

The truck handles better in all aspects except for one. During down hill braking turns on gravel the rear gets very light and slides out. Never noticed this as much with the factory setup.

Not sure if I am just going faster with my new setup which makes this more noticeable.

Is there an fix for this, ie less rebound in the back or more damping in the front. I am pretty sure the rear shocks are not adjustable, and I dont want to pull the front shock/coilovers apart so I guess I am just putting this out for discussion.

Would a rear sway bar help??

Thanks in advance

Gas Can
 

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i dont think shock valving has anything to do with this. plus, DR/ICON has the shock valving on point from the factory. "down hill braking turns on gravel " sounds very situational. this really happens ALL the time?
 

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BTW, post pics of your truck! :)
 

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If the new leaf pack stiffened the rear that will be your answer. Stiffer springs will make the rear bounce. You also may have messed up the corner balancing. My son road races (off road track) and any suspension changes he makes he is back getting it corner balanced.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was wondering if the damping/rebound would keep the truck from pitching forward during braking thereby lightening the rear.

BZP: I put it up 1". I just made a 3 hole braket where the original upper hole is the new bottom hole and the top and bottom braket holes keep it together.

I suppose its just nature of truck being so light in the rear to start with. The added spring rate in the back just makes it worse.

Gas Can
 

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Very common in real life, unless you have a super-engineered race truck, and even then ----.

There is a natural tendency for more severe weight transfer than normal when braking going downhill, thus lightening the rear and exacerbating the possibility of sliding or fishtailing. On gravel, especially loose gravel, even the best engineered truck will fishtail and slide around at almost any speed when going downhill, especially if you let off the throttle and/or get on the brakes; the steeper the hill the more chance for slip. Add a curve into the mix, and you have an "E Ticket" ride. About the only way to avoid it is to start the descent from a stop, in as low a gear as you have, and just let gravity have its way, only applying just the very lightest amount of throttle to keep it in a straight line; even then, you have to be careful and very judicious to keep it from running away. Easy does it is the way to go. How do I know?? Got a few hours?
 
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