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So I need to get around 1 yard of sand and gravel to my house from a gravel yard that is about 6-7 miles from my home. I don't want to damage the truck but I do know these trucks are very light 1/2 ton's. That being said, I think a yard of either is around 2,500lbs give or take so I guess a couple of loads for each to be safe? Question is, how do I tell when to stop loading or at what point do I have the tractor/load operator stop filling up, it's not like there's a guage :ts:
 

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I just did this Memorial Day weekend in my truck. The loader dropped the sand into my bed and I helped him see when it was almost on the bump stops. He seemed to have a pretty good idea on his own though so he may have not needed my help. I then shoveled the sand as far forward in the bed as I could get it. I had my bed filled about 2/3rds of the way but only high enough so that my tonnneau still rolled over it. it was very heavy but rode fine and I was about a 1/4" from the bumpstops. Good luck.
 

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I've been hauling quite bit over this past summer, mostly loam but some mulch now and again. Everytime i got 1 yard put in and in most cases slightly over a yard. As long as you know what you're doing then it isn't a big deal but don't expect the truck to handle the same loaded as unloaded. Now gravel is heavier than loam and i would be somewhat reluctant to haul a yard of gravel for a great distance. I've hauled a yard of gravel before but only about 2-3 miles from the pit and i had no problems. Best bet is to make sure the rear tires are at the high end of the psi specs and take it slow and easy and it'll be fine.

And i wouldn't say these are "light duty 1/2 ton trucks" since the Tundra's haul better than any Ford or Chevy 1/2 ton i've ever driven.
 

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I had 2400lbs in the back. it was almost on those rubber stops. Took it easy (trip ~6 miles) and it was all good. It only feels like its without stabilizer bars - truck moves side to side a lot on curvy roads. Had bedfull of topsoil, ~1/2 to rubber stops - as long as you don't go 60mpg or go at speed over bump/pot holes you'll be OK. Keep in mind thats overloading the truck a lot - not recommended but doable.
 

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My Tundra hauled a half pallet of "belgian-block" (natural stone blocks approx 6x6x12) from the local rock/stone supplier easily. The loader was very conscientious of the weight/load and moved it forward of the rear wheels to ensure safe hauling for the truck and load. The loader limited the load as if it were his own truck and I made another trip for the other half. Sensible loading made it safe for the truck no matter the brand and for problem-free delivery. IMO the plastic liner has its faults but helped the relatively thin metal survive the load. I will get the bed coated with linex or rhino but will keep a piece of the plastic liner handy for heavy rough damaging loads
 

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Line-X/Rhino is very cool as long as you haul mulch - if hauling any dense materials like blockes, or anything bulky heavy will dent the shyt out of bed. Very good idea to cut out bottom part of bed liner for protection.
 

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I was hauling crush (a sand and gravel mixture) in my truck and I did 1/2 yard trips just to be safe. It was also before I had my AAL's in. The truck had more than enough power to do it just not the payload.
 

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I had 2 yards in the back of my 2000 tundra accesscab with 230k miles on it. I moved 20 yards of river rock in 4 days. 2 yards at a time. drove about 30 miles each time. The tundra can handle it
 

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just follow ICON advise and you will be safe

Pavers Brick


54 bags of 80lbs concrete


 

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So I need to get around 1 yard of sand and gravel to my house from a gravel yard that is about 6-7 miles from my home. I don't want to damage the truck but I do know these trucks are very light 1/2 ton's. That being said, I think a yard of either is around 2,500lbs give or take so I guess a couple of loads for each to be safe? Question is, how do I tell when to stop loading or at what point do I have the tractor/load operator stop filling up, it's not like there's a guage :ts:
Make at least two, even three, trips. A cubic foot of dry, loose gravel with 1/4" to 2" stones is 105 pounds per cubic foot. So, a cubic yard is that times 27, or 2835 lb. (There are 27 cubic feet in a cubic yard.). A yard of sand weighs approximately 1.3 tons or 2600 pounds.

It makes no sense at all to overload your truck. Every suspension component is maxed out. The tires are at or beyond their limits. The brakes are overtaxed in bringing your truck to a stop. And the motoring public has one more problem to face.
 

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I just hauled a load of clay loam about 3 miles. I backed up to a pile and started shoveling it in. I did not stop untill I got real tired. The bed was not full, but the rear suspension was sitting on the bumpstops. The rear tires 275 45 20 at 40psi were visibly squished about 3/4 to 1 inch compaired to the front. I was unsure how much weight it took to do that but I was sure it was probably overloaded. I was real easy with it and made it to my destination. I took pics. I might try to post them up sometime.
 

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I've had the back bed loaded with firewood to the rails, pretty dense and tightly stacked in there. It made the back level with the front, increased stopping distance a lil bit, barely decreased acceleration, and improved the ride (believe it if you wish, its true). I say load that puppy up...to 1500lbs, no more.
 
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