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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone!
So this morning I go out and get gas and the both low beam headlights do not work. The parking lights work, the highbeams are good and the fuses are good. (NO daytime running lights) So any way, to my surprise BOTH bulbs were blown. The weird thing is I replaced both in Sept 2005. Good thing I still had the originals tucked away. Both were Sylvania Cool Blues. Does anyone have any suggestions on replacement bulbs, something that appears brighter than the stock bulbs without modifications. (PIAAA?)

Thanks All
 

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thats what im currently running in my 04 tundra. the 7000k are a little on the blue side, id opt for a 5000-6000k next time. longer lasting than sylvania silver stars. i cant even get a year out of the sylvanias. nokyas can be found on ebay.
 

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Sylvania Silverstar Ultra's. They are available at most major autoparts stores or online (ebay, etc). But make sure you get the Ultra's as the 1st generation Silverstar's had a tendancy to burn out fairly quickly which has supposedly been fixed in the upgraded Ultra's.
 

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Sylvania Silverstar Ultra's. They are available at most major autoparts stores or online (ebay, etc). But make sure you get the Ultra's as the 1st generation Silverstar's had a tendancy to burn out fairly quickly which has supposedly been fixed in the upgraded Ultra's.

DITTO... I agree and the above is true. Get the Silver Star Ultra...XXXX STU #'s. Aprox. $49/pair

The Nokya's are great too, but not easily available. I don't believe in a higher Kelvin than 5000 with non HID bulbs. Because they achieve the rating via using a higher wattage and run way too hot for my liking.


LT:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What about the factory fog lights? Sylvania.com has their size chart/bulb replacement chart as using the same (9006) as the low beam bulbs. Is that possible? The Toyota manual says do not replace several of the front lights on your own, bring to dealer.???
 

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I replaced the fogs on the Highlander with the Silverstars as well... Osram sells similar bulbs to the Silverstars but with a slight yellowish tint especially for fog. I have these installed in my Sequoia fog lamps, but they have to be ordered online.

All of the front bulbs on the Highlander can easily be changed. Just make sure you do not touch any of the glass on the new bulbs during installation as the oil from your fingers can create hot spots which can reduce its life.
 

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check ebay i got a brand new set of the sliverstar ultras for my sisters car for 25 bucks shipped
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just put in a set of the SIlverstar Ultras. I switched out one first to compare to the bulbs that came with Highlander. I am in a dimly lit garage. Honestly I see a difference! The originals appear more 'yellow' and the Ultra is more pure 'white'. Seems at least 25% brighter. So I am hooked :) Thanks all...
 

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By the way, you guys can also mod the 9005 (high beam) bulb to fit in the 9006 (low beam) socket. It won't fry the harness because high and lows use the same harness. It won't blind people because it is still pointing in the low beam height, either.

Here's the guide to doing the mod:
BMW E34 Website

My personal experience: 9005 silverstars are bright, but didnt last long in my gf's honda accord (about 4 months). I had 9005 sylvania cool blues in my camry and they lasted for years (in fact, they were still in the car when I sold it). I've heard good things about GE nighthawk bulbs so I have a pair of 9005's and am ready to mod and install when one of my current ones go out.

some comparision pics off scionlife forums..

9006 stock vs 9005 silverstars



luminics 9005 vs luminics 9006 (more white than pic)


silverstars 9005
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I also had the Cool Blues on my 2002 Highlander, they were nice. Only lasted me 18 months. But I got my wife into the habit of driving with the headlites on all the time since the 02 did not have daytime runners. So they were on all the time. But I find the UltraStars much brighter.
 

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If you want to spend a little more money, HID is also a good option. It gives a lot more lights than regular bulbs and the installation is very easy. You would need to lower your headlight aim a bit though since the lens are not designed for HID.
 

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If you want to spend a little more money, HID is also a good option. It gives a lot more lights than regular bulbs and the installation is very easy. You would need to lower your headlight aim a bit though since the lens are not designed for HID.
HID in a halogen designed housing is a big no no. HID kits are junk and useless for performance. They are only good if you want a HID appearance.

Spend the money and do it right with using HID oem components (HID projectors and oe ballasts and bulbs)

Think again before getting a HID kit HiDPlanet.com :: Log in

HiDPlanet.com :: Log in



Also about the blue or coated bulbs, let me shed the truth HiDPlanet.com :: Log in
 

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I am speaking of as a 4-year HID kit user and all I have are positive input. I really have to disagree with you... HID kits are not junk. Not for the reason to sell another forum on Tundra Solution.
 

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The video clip is good and I don't disagree on HIDs are not designed for a halogen housing. This can be easily explained that the latest/higher end HID equipped vehicles are using projector lens. However, some current and earlier models (i.e., Toyota Avalon, Nissan Altima, Last generation Lexus RX, GS, and LS, Last generation Acura TL, etc) are still using the halogen housing for HID. How do the factory vehicles get away with this? Answer: >>> A carefully adjusted light beam<<<

The HID kit illuminates better than conventional halogen and it needs to be re-aligned after the installation so the light is not offensive to the on-coming traffic.

The HID kit is not for everyone, it's just an alternate option to "oconn11" original post.
 

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The video clip is good and I don't disagree on HIDs are not designed for a halogen housing. This can be easily explained that the latest/higher end HID equipped vehicles are using projector lens. However, some current and earlier models (i.e., Toyota Avalon, Nissan Altima, Last generation Lexus RX, GS, and LS, Last generation Acura TL, etc) are still using the halogen housing for HID. How do the factory vehicles get away with this? Answer: >>> A carefully adjusted light beam<<<
The "older" HID units used in vehicles that came with HID as an option but used a reflector instead of a projector still use a HID designed housing. I say "older" because these days more and more manufactures are realizing the advatanges of HID projector technology has over HID reflector technology. But back to my point about why those older generation vehicles had HID in their reflectors. Those relfectors you see are actually HID designed units ;). They differ from the conventional halogen units even though most wouldn't see it to the naked eye. The reflector is designed to only allow the top portion of the reflector (the portion that throws beam on the road) versus allowing the bottom portion to reflect (which produces beam above the cutoff). Those systems are referred to as D2R housings as those use D2R bulbs (they are just D2S bulbs with a glare coating going around the bulb and also a different notch on the seat of the bulb).

I explain it here in my HID newbie crash course HiDPlanet.com :: Log in

What is the difference between D2R and D2S?

The main difference is the U-shaped masking on the D2R that blocks out unpredictable light in certain directions. Also, the base has different notches. Name of base is P32-d2 for D2S and P32-d3 for D2R. D2R was developed so that Mercedes could still use their reflector based headlights in the mid 1990s. They did not want use projectors like BMW. A glare box inside the headlight could have been used to accomplish a straight line, but a mask painted on the bulb was cheaper to make and had better precision. Other (near) luxury cars (Lexus, Infinity and Acura) followed Mercedes and equipped their cars with D2R bulbs in reflector based headlamps. Using a D2R in anything else than a OEM HID headlight designed for the D2R bulb makes no sense. It will only reduce output. Some HID kits comes with D2R bulbs. Some amateur kit designers will even claim that D2R genrally reduces glare in a retrofit. This is nonsense. The D2R bulb masking is around 3-4 a'clock and 8-9 o'clock when bulb is in right position. Those are not the (only) sectors that creates glare.
As an example, here is the data on Philips 2 versions:
D2S: 3200lm, 4250K, 91lm/W, 35W
D2R: 2800lm, 4150K, 80lm/W, 35W

Above from left, D2R and D2S. Note that Philips does not make blue painted HID bulbs. The appearant blue color is just background.

The HID kit illuminates better than conventional halogen and it needs to be re-aligned after the installation so the light is not offensive to the on-coming traffic.
But doing so is also counterproductive because you're now limiting how far your lights shine if you have to aim them down. So yeah, you gained some outpout by going HID but you lost some performance in distance and even distribution of light.

I just want to mention that I'm not trying to knock on your HID kit. I've been doing HID for over 10 years and have come to realize people will be set in their ways. However this is usually because they are uninformed and don't know the truth of the matter. Everyone has to start somewhere so I don't expect people to understand or know everything there is to know. But i'm here to help you guys in lighting by getting the facts out and helping inform you all. I hope all here can keep an open mind :)
 
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