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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I have a 2006 Tundra Access Cab/V-8/4WD/TRD and I just put on new tires which are Michelin LTX MS2. I know the door sticker says to inflate the front and rear tires to 30 and 29 psi respectively but that seems low to me. The max cold inflation pressure on the new tires I just put on is 44 psi. Does anyone have any thoughts/wisdom on this please? They are at 40 psi now but I don't want to ruin them.

As a side not I kept the stock BF Goodrich radial TA's at 33/32 psi front to back and the wore on the outer and inner edges much faster than the center and the tire center told me that that was the way those tires just happened to wear. I always rotate the tires every 5000 miles and check the air monthly.

I just want these tires to last as long as they are supposed to....

thank you in advance everyone and I hope that your day goes well.

Very respectfully,
Mike :)
 

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A quick way to check for proper inflation is to draw a few straight lines across the tread of all 4 tires and drive in a straight line a few feet. Look at the chalk lines on the ground after. If the chalk line is only on the sides you don't have enough pressure, if it is only in the middle you have to much. You want to see the line even and then your right on. Good luck i've heard lots of good things about those tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll try the chalk thing as soon as I can get some chalk, thank you! Does anyone out there have an inflation numbers that they have run with this truck/tire combo that has worked in the past for them by any chance? That way I know where to start....now off to get some chalk. Thanks again!

Mike
 

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Just find a construction site or a dusty field....drive from the field onto pavement and itll do the same thing.

No need to waste money on chalk if you dont have any.
 

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I switched to 35 in front and rear after putting on a new set of stock size tires. Wear looks pretty good so far. Fronts always seem to wear a little more on the edge, but barely noticeable at the higher pressure. I struggled deviating from the door decal, but don't believe 29 psi is good for tire life. The original tires were worn excessively on the edges.
 

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40 is too high. The air carries the load and thats why the rear is lower than the front on the sticker. Toyota rates the tires for an empty truck. I run mine at 32 front and rear so I don't have to mess with the rear if I put something in the truck. The chalk test should give you a decent idea of the proper pressure, but start low and go up slowly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will try the chalk test but I will also bring the pressure down to 35 on each tire first. The car seemed a little bouncy yesterday with all that air in the tires but it rode better overall. The stock BF Goodrich tires wore excessively on both edges on all tires. The dealer said that was common of those tires despite proper inflation/rotations/alignment.

The new Michelin LTX MS2's are rated at 44 PSI max cold so I thought 40 would be OK for them. I guess that is a bit high so I'll start with 35 and do the chalk/dusty field test as soon as I get chalk or find a field. Thanks guys.

By the way...did anyone try that test with wet tires.....will that work? Thanks again.

Mike
 

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LTX M/S 35psi front and rear. Good even wear across on all four tires
 

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A lot also depends on tire size as well. Are these larger than stock or the same size?
 

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Wear on sides = under inflation
Wear on center = over inflation
Wear on sides (uneven) = wrong alignment or fast cornering (hence worn out outer edge)
I'd say 35 -37. 29 as per Toyota is way too low - a lot of rolling resistance will be added (drop in MPG) and tire wear. Look up specifications in tire description or contact Michelin man.
More PSI = more work for suspension, bumpier ride, but stiffer as well. Air it down to 29 and it will feel like winter tires = mushy is you try do drive like snake in s on a highway.
 

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It's your truck and your tires ... air the tires to any reasonable pressure that gives you peace of mind and comfort. I suggest putting 36 psi in all 4 tires just to try it out. Drive a few weeks that way and decide whether the rear end is too bouncy. During highway driving, your tires are gonna gain about 4 lbs. just from heating up, so at 36 psi cold you'll heat up to around 40 psi.

I used to run my tires at 40 psi fore and aft, but after 30,000 miles (+/-) I noticed that the centers of the treads were wearing slightly faster than the shoulders, so I backed down to 36 psi cold. I'm happy with that and I'll leave it there. I'll be getting new tires before the end of the year, and I'll keep them at 36 psi cold.
 

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I run mine (stock dunlops) at 35psi front and 32psi rear empty, towing I bump it up 38psi front and 40psi rear.

Dealership put these tires on when I bought the truck used two years ago they absolutely suck in the rain but seem to be wearing pretty well with just under 20,000 miles on them including several thousand miles towing.

I would start out at 35 front/32 rear see how it feels the stock pressure toyota lists will make it ride soft but it wont handle well.

Rotate and balance you should get 50,000+ out of those tires!
 

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I have had my LTX M/S for over 50,000 miles now and keep them at 35-PSI F/R. No issues at all with wear or anything else and they have been AWESOME tires. I can only imagine the 2ndGen LTX's will be better as I'm a huge fan of Michelin tires as they are on the wife's RAV4 and my Corvette.

I look forward to the LTX M/SII, possibly this fall/early winter as I think probably have another 10,000 or so to go before I'll need new tires. Please let us know how they are over the next few months.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hello all....I have finished one week with the LTX MS2's at 40 psi for a few days and 35 psi for a few days. At 40 psi (for all tires) the ride is good and if anything is slightly bouncy but I do not mind it that much at all. At 35 psi the ride feels like my stock bf goodrich tires did. The rear tires look great at 35 psi but the front tires look like they could use a bit more air at 35 psi as I see a slight bulge on the side where the tire meets the pavement. I am thinking of trying 37 or 38 psi all the way around.

on another note, i received a really good reading letter about tire inflation pressures from another user that I want to share. I am going to try this method in the near future once I get a chance to see if it helps me figure out where to set my tires. Here is what the unknown author stated:

I'd like to thank the gentleman that sent it to me to read but don't want to mention his name in case he wants to keep it private...you know privacy acts and all.

well, if you read this let me know what you think and if you have any experience with the Michelins and a good tire pressure to keep them at for a 4x4 access cab gen 1 Tundra! Keep it rolling all.

Mike

Proper Tire Air Pressure (Author unknown, but makes good sense.)

I worked for Michelin Tire Corporation for 7 years and Yokohama Tire Corporation for 11 years. I have given numerous seminars on tire maintenance and especially how to determine the correct tire pressures. So here goes.

The pressure on the sidewall of the tire is the maximum pressure at the published load at approximately 55 mph. (The speed can vary somewhat, but it is not important for this discussion.)

The air pressure is required to support the load that the tire must carry in such a manner that the tire flexes at the designed place on the sidewall of the tire.

If the load on the tire changes, then the air pressure should change accordingly to keep the tire flexing at the proper place. The reason for correct air pressure is to prevent the tire from overheating. It was put together with heat, and it will come apart the same way. An under-inflated tire will eventually self-destruct due to excessive heat build-up. An over-inflated tire will ride harshly and be more likely to burst upon impact.

To determine the correct air pressure, check the pressure when the tire is cold. Run the tire for several miles at highway speed. Stop and immediately check the air pressure in the tire. It should be higher than when cold, but no more than 10% higher.

Now here is the hard-to-believe part. If the pressure is more than 10% higher, you must ADD AIR and test again. For example, you start with 50 psi cold. If the pressure is 60 psi when hot, you have exceeded the (10% in this case,) 55 psi maximum safe heat build-up pressure. You must ADD AIR. In this case I would add 5 psi, which would take the tire to 65 psi when hot. After you run the tire again you will find the pressure actually drops because the tire will run cooler. The heat build-up causes the tire pressure to increase when under-inflated.

On the other hand, if the 50 psi cold pressure does not change when hot, you have more air than needed. You can remove 5 psi or so again when they return to cold. Like the next trip you take.

So, a fully loaded rig will require more air in the tires than one with empty tanks and a light load on board. Always err on the side of over-inflation. Thus, the maximum sidewall pressure indicated on the tire is usually used. It usually is more than needed. Each axle has its own requirement based upon the load on that axle.
 

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Great info, Huevotoro!

(Rep point your way.)
 

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New 2000 owner here. Just upgraded the Firestone junk that some prior owner had put on the truck to Michelin M/S2's. Used DJ's alignment specs and hub centric balancing for the factory add on alloy's (so they said)... So when I get home, all tires had 40 PSI in them. Truck rode and handled much better than the Firestone junk. A little bouncy, but for stock, big big improvement.

So, after searching the truck (the original factory door sticker was for a different size tire... I'm guessing stock. So I check the paperwork that came with the tires... It said 26psi front, 29psi rear. I checked the book... low and behold, it seemed to concur. So, I check here... and find the writeup from the former tire engineer... Hmmm... seems reasonable.

Now, the experiment. I adjusted the tire pressures to the 26/29psi recommendations. A little around town driving over the past few days and things are great!!! Tire wear looks like I would expect (my driveway helps, but no chalk test). So, tonight, we spent about 1.5 hrs driving up to ECU for a baseball game. Before leaving, re-confirmed that the tires actually had 26/29. After a blistering trip up 264 (great pavement) we checked the pressures immediately upon arriving at the stadium. Front pressure started at 26 psi, ended at 28 psi. Rear pressure started at 29 psi, ended at 30 psi. So, according to the writeup from the tire engineer, I'm within the 10% as front should not exceed 28.6 and rear should not exceed 31.9.

I'll monitor things for wear and report back as things develop, but I am really pleased with the Michelin M/S 2 setup at this point. No vibration, no shimmy, truck runs absolutely hands off for quite a distance... (Kudos to DJ)...

I'd be interested to see what other folks experience has been and will post back any updates.

Thanks again for everyone's valuable information on this forum!!!
 
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