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i have a 01 tundra limited 4x4 with 162,000 miles on it. i am planing a trip from socall to washinton with a 12ft tandom axle trailer with the trailer fully louded it is about 3ooo lbs. i have trialer bakes in the truck and trailer and a 10000lb hitch. good or bad idea and what kind of mpgs should i get thanx
 

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i have a 01 tundra limited 4x4 with 162,000 miles on it. i am planing a trip from socall to washinton with a 12ft tandom axle trailer with the trailer fully louded it is about 3ooo lbs. i have trialer bakes in the truck and trailer and a 10000lb hitch. good or bad idea and what kind of mpgs should i get thanx
I would guess that you are going to get between 8 and 10 mpg. I pulled my landscaping trailer grossed at 5 and even 6 thousand pounds during the leaf season and got between 9 and 13 depending on traffic conditions but that was mostly in-town.

Here is one of my posts on pulling the trailer on the highway (one of the very few times I have done so) Compliment from a Chevy guy.

Running to Louisville, Kentucky tomorrow to retrieve one of our other trailers which was towed down there by a Dodge which promptly played show and tell at the expo by dropping its transmission in the parking lot. I will post up what my MPG numbers are when I get back in town tomorrow night.

Trailer brakes are a darn nice thing to have. As long as you go over your checklist you should be fine - inspect all the obvious like brakes, fluids, tires, connections, etc.
 

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I have made that run a few times. On the flats you should be ok to run with the OD any incline and turn it off. You should average 10-11 for the trip. I would average just under 9 pulling a 20ft TT @ 5k. Your milage will very with your speed.
 

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Ditto on sr5mike on the O.D. My guess is in the 10 M.P.G. range until you get out of the basin, (tough going up the 5 FWY). Check your radiator coolant mix and carry some water/coolant with you or just mix up a couple of gallons. I'd have it serviced before, (oil/filter, tire rotation/balance, brakes, hoses......). Air up the tires before the trip. Watch how the trailers loaded; Keep most of the weight from the tandoms forward. Blind spot mirrors on your side views is a good idea.
 

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BW Voice , I'd like to do a bit of nit-picking with you on something you said ; "Keep most of the weight from the tandoms forward."
It is critical for control purposes to distribute the weight with only 10% of the total weight on the tongue of the trailer. The tongue is designed to PULL the weight , while the axles are designed to CARRY the weight. For example ; if the trailer is designed to haul 5000 pounds , you'd want 500 pounds tongue weight.
Another good reason not to overload the tongue of the trailer as well as the rear axle is because the bearings of the rear axle can fail , break an axle and leave you stranded. You'd be lucky if that doesn't cause you to crash. Don't ask me how I know that. :-(
Also , Swanee , keep in mind that if your trailer has an expanded steel gate that hinges up to a vertical position , it will act as a parachute. I burned a 1/3 of a tank of gas at a max of 70 mph between Orlando and Daytona.
 

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As long as you not overloaded and truck in good mechanical condition you are fine. Besides you will be towing half of what Tundra is capable of. OD off and does your Tundra has the external tranny cooler? Keep an eye on it.
 

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BW Voice , I'd like to do a bit of nit-picking with you on something you said ; "Keep most of the weight from the tandoms forward."
It is critical for control purposes to distribute the weight with only 10% of the total weight on the tongue of the trailer. The tongue is designed to PULL the weight , while the axles are designed to CARRY the weight. For example ; if the trailer is designed to haul 5000 pounds , you'd want 500 pounds tongue weight.
Another good reason not to overload the tongue of the trailer as well as the rear axle is because the bearings of the rear axle can fail , break an axle and leave you stranded. You'd be lucky if that doesn't cause you to crash. Don't ask me how I know that. :-(
Also , Swanee , keep in mind that if your trailer has an expanded steel gate that hinges up to a vertical position , it will act as a parachute. I burned a 1/3 of a tank of gas at a max of 70 mph between Orlando and Daytona.


there is no better way to make a trailer sway than loading the back of one. Keep most of your weight in front of the trailer axles. That weight will be distrubuted evenly, if you pack correctly, over the axles of the trailer, not the tongue. Tongue weight will be roughly 10% of total trailer weight, including the load. Also a WDH will spread that weight over both axles of the truck.
 

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If I recall correctly, it's 70/30 with 70 percent of the cargo weight from the tandoms forward and 30 percent in the back of the tandoms. I've seen trailer rock and roll from tire(s) to tire(s) because they were not loaded correctly.
 

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I just towed heavy trailer with sequoia (around 3500 miles). You should average around 10mpg. If you want best fuel economy don't drive faster then 60-65mph.

 

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Tinik, WTF are those??? moonshine :D
 
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