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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I am getting ready to do all this work on my truck and I would like to run it by a couple of you guys for incase I am missing anything. Regarding the lift, I have a couple options

1) the standard ride hight on my truck now is 35.5" in front and 37" in the rear. I am going to install the Bilstein 5100s front and rear and a 1.25" block in the back. setting the 5100 at 2" in the front with the blocks in the back moves it to 37.5" F and 38.25 R with a rear being 1.2" higher than the front

2) lifting the truck 2.5" F and the 1.25" R will put it at 38.0" F and 38.25" R with the rear being .25" higher.

I am also planning on doing the diff drop at the same time and I am also installing the Hellwig rear sway bar at the same time.

So here are my questions. Do you guys foresee any problems I might run into doing this and what would you choose option 1 or 2???? The answer is quite obvious to me for I want the truck as level as possible with a little aditional lift.

All you inputs will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance

:ts:
 

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If you do option #2 you'll be set for 285's when the temptation comes, and trust me it will come!! I running on the 4th notch up front with no blocks in the rear and it has a little "socal" lean to it, but probly because my springs are wasted. But usually the 4th notch makes the truck level w/out doing anyting to the rear. Top notch and a bolck in the rear should be about level, either way it will look great, and you can get rid of that sink bug look!!

Oh, and the biggest problem you will run into is installing the rear shocks, ahhh what a b$%$^ch!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hahahaha... it can be a bigger B^%$ch than the headers though.... LOL Thank you for your input
 

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If you do option #2 you'll be set for 285's when the temptation comes, and trust me it will come!! I running on the 4th notch up front with no blocks in the rear and it has a little "socal" lean to it

Oh, and the biggest problem you will run into is installing the rear shocks, ahhh what a b$%$^ch!!!
SOCAL LEAN:D:tu:
Installing rear shocks:td::mad:

haha! Getting the old shocks off is a real PITA, a different kind of pain than headers. I suggest vice grips, and an extra set of hands for this. You will destroy the old shocks, but you can only have so much patience with them.

Rear 5100s are only made to go with 1" lift over stock, but an extra .25" may not hurt. Don't forget to adjust the brake proportioning valve thingy. Good luck, and remember to post some before and after pics.
 

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Either setup will allow for a 255/85 sized tire...if you like a tall, narrow tire that is. Some do some don't.
 

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I did 5100's on the top notch in the front, 5100s in the rear and a 1" block and it sits level. I agree, the rear shocks were miserable. The engineer that thought that up should be choked.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok so I finally have all my parts and a lot of printed tips and trick off this website. the only thing I need to know id how to adjust the brake proportioning valve thingy... what is this and how do I do it?
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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Ok so I finally have all my parts and a lot of printed tips and trick off this website. the only thing I need to know id how to adjust the brake proportioning valve thingy... what is this and how do I do it?
You can't do it properly in your driveway. It requires very specific amounts of weight in different parts of the vehicle as well as a specific pressure measuring tool that only the dealer would have. Some people have simply relocated the axle mounting point up by whatever lift was added by installing an extension bracket. This tries to accomplish the general idea, but all anyone is doing is [email protected] guessing as to the accuracy.

To give you an idea, every 360 degree rotation of the adjusting nut accounts for 11lbs of applied pressure. How are you going to measure that in your driveway?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You can't do it properly in your driveway. It requires very specific amounts of weight in different parts of the vehicle as well as a specific pressure measuring tool that only the dealer would have. Some people have simply relocated the axle mounting point up by whatever lift was added by installing an extension bracket. This tries to accomplish the general idea, but all anyone is doing is [email protected] guessing as to the accuracy.

To give you an idea, every 360 degree rotation of the adjusting nut accounts for 11lbs of applied pressure. How are you going to measure that in your driveway?
Oh ok, so can I take it to a dealer or some shock shop to adjust? What does this valve do?
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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What does this valve do?
It proportions the amount of rear braking force (line pressure) based upon the amount of weight in the bed of the truck. Hence its name: Load Sensing Braking & Proportioning Valve (LSB&PV).

The other reason for using a proportioning valve to reduce hydraulic pressure to the rear brakes has to do with the design of the brakes themselves. When hydraulic pressure is applied to the wheel cylinder inside a drum brake, the shoes are pushed outward against the drum. When the shoes make contact, the rotation of the drum tries to drag them along. But since the shoes are anchored in place, the drum pulls the shoes up tighter only against itself. Because of this, drum brakes that are "self-energizing" require little additional pedal effort once the brakes are applied. Disc brakes, on the other hand, are not self-energizing. It takes increased pedal effort to squeeze the pads against the rotor.

Note that load-sensing proportioning valves are also calibrated to work with stock springs. Any suspension modifications that increase the load-carrying capability (installing helper springs, or overload or air-assist shocks, for example) may adversely affect the operation of this type of proportioning valve. Modifications that make the suspension stiffer reduce the amount of deflection in the suspension when the vehicle is loaded, which prevents the proportioning valve from increasing rear brake effort as much as it normally would. A defective proportioning valve, or one that is not properly adjusted, can also upset brake balance. If the rear brakes on a vehicle seem to be overly aggressive (too much pressure to the rear brakes), or the vehicle seems to take too long to stop (not enough pressure to the rear brakes), the problem may be a bad proportioning valve. Proportioning valves are tested by installing a pair of tightly-calibrated hydraulic gauges (one on each side of the valve) to see if the valve reduces pressure as it should.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
EPIC FAIL!!!!

Ok so I attempted to do the shock swap my self and everything went kinda ok although it was a fight with everything from the beginning. The bolt that held the old shocks in at the bottom we couldnt get out for they cought on the CV axle once we got the spring comressor on and compressed and took the old shock off and the neww one in we released the compressor and couldnt get the clews out. Here is where it all went from 0-S&*t in under 1 sec.

As I picked up the new mounted shock in the coil spring I grabbed the bottom part of the shock with my left hand and the top part with my right. As I lifted it the little "C" clip on the shock failed and threw everything all over my Garage! My left hand was bleeding all over the place and the brand new Bilstein shock was totaled! the mount bracket at the bottom looked like a tear drop as the coilsring and the other hardware hit it.

Well Big O is doing the work for me on Wednesday as soon as I get my replacement shock from Summit. I thought I was pretty handy and thought I could get this done but its not worth losing a hand or an eye....

Here are some picks for you to LOL. Have fun and chat later.
 

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Damn...you're lucky you still have both hands! Are you absolutely 100% certain that the snap ring was properly seated?

For future reference...it's easier to separate the spindle from the steering knuckle using the four bolts under the knuckle, when removing the coilover on a 4WD. Pop the swaybar end links loose from the lower control arms while the truck is on flat ground, then put the front in the air, and remove the four bolts. You can swing the spindle out of the way at that point, so it's easy to remove the lower shock bolt.

-Sean
 

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Now, boys and girls, this is why we have professionals to do the things that we have no idea how to accomplish. You are very lucky indeed.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hahahaha.... i had a good laugh reading these reply s and yes... I know I am lucky! I made very sure I had everything in the right place but looking at the little flyer that came with the shocks I think we got the spring perch upside down (I think) It was just a little too hard to have done everything right. Although I am meticulous about things like that and cannot think I have made such a dumb mistake... and indeed bigmoney, that is why we have pros.... LOL
 

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Oh, you'd be surprised at how much "the pros" don't actually know and will be looking up online same as you...

...the big difference is, it's not your hands getting torn off by a rogue coil spring, and there's someone to blame when everything goes wrong. I imagine being a mechanic is an often-thankless job.

-Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yea I guess thats true too... well at least even with my crippled paw i managed to install the hellwig sway bar and spray my bumber with bed liner. so the weekend wasnt a complete waist...LOL
 

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I tried doing the same thing, I got to the point where I saw the spring compressor bolts bending into a U shape. I carefully took pressure off like defusing a bomb and brought it to 4wheelparts. Like others have said, you're lucky, but thats how you learn I guess!!
 

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I've never liked coil compressors. They always got me so nervous that I was more prone to disaster, somehow I just kept getting lucky. Glad that you only got a minor injury, could have been much worse.
 

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Wow! Good thing it wasn't worse. I remember installing mine and they certainly were no cake walk. Those spring compressors are not fun and as Derek said, when they bend into a U-shape it can make you a little nervous.

I am glad to hear that you got the sway bar on! I hope you are enjoying it!
 
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