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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I keep my tires inflated to the max will my mpg increase? Will this cause my tires to wear faster? Will it decrease traction on wet roads?
 

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higer pressure = better mpg........also premature tire wear
 

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Higher Pressure = rougher ride. Especially if you have AllTerrain tires.
 

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Bouncy ride and way faster wear. I highly doubt your MPG will increase enough to justify faster tire wear, if it even increases at all.

The best thing to save on gas... Drive like your grandparents. SLOW :D
 

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maybe, definately, definately, hope you have a good dental plan and a great alignment warranty.

your tires are part of the suspension equation. leave them at or around the recommended pressure.

i change mine depending on the load...right now, with an empty/stripped truck and a bunch of trail armor on large tires, it's at 26F/24R, when it's loaded to the max it's 35F/35R (i manage almost a 50/50 weight distro :D).

-sean
 

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Higher pressures will wear the centers faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, if the max pressure on my tires is 50psi what should I "nor4mally" be running them at? When I pull my trailer (26'/4700 lbs) what should I be running the tires at? Thanks
 

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So, if the max pressure on my tires is 50psi what should I "nor4mally" be running them at? When I pull my trailer (26'/4700 lbs) what should I be running the tires at? Thanks
Whatever it says inside the drivers side door jam is what you should run at. If you're hauling, up the pressure maybe 5-6psi in the back for good measure.
 

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So, if the max pressure on my tires is 50psi what should I "nor4mally" be running them at? When I pull my trailer (26'/4700 lbs) what should I be running the tires at? Thanks
No one pressure is a good choice for everybody.

To determine the proper pressure for your truck and your particular tires, (starting on cold tires) take a peice of chalk and make a mark all the way accross the tread, and then drive it for about 100 yards or so, and get out and check your chalk marks. IF the chalk is gone in the center, reduce the air pressure. If the chalk is gone on the sides, increase the air pressure. You want the chalk to be worn off across the entire tire. About 32 front, 30 rear are the right pressures for my truck, but I choose to run them at 34 all around for a more responsive truck.

Good luck! :tu:
 

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Man, if I ran the recommended pressures on the door, I would not be happy. The door pressures drive like a rental car. I run 34 psi all around for a daily driver. I used the chalk method to determine if I was getting good traction. I used my butt to determine the best handling.

When I tow, they all go to 44 psi. I tow at the max GVWR, GCWR and RAWR for the Tundra. Although 44 psi is not required per the tire specs for that load, it is required for stability. The P rated tires are ok, but they will get replaced with LT tires for towing.


Tom
 

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Not to be contrary, but in recent weeks I saw a report that tire pressure had no effect on gas mileage. The report said for safety reasons you should not allow the pressure to get low. They had tested tires under different pressures. I'll see if I can find it and post it.
 

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Tire pressure DOES have an effect on MPG's. I've personally verified it on different vehicles over LOTS of miles.

On my Tundra the difference between 28 psi and 35 psi is around 2-3 miles per gal. On a Honda Accord I used to have the difference between 30 and 34 psi was likewise around 2 MPG.

If you overinflate, then yes, you'll wear out the center of the tread, however, if you run your tires underinflated by going with the 'door sticker' pressures, then just accept the fact that you have a sharply reduced load capacity on the tires. A rough estimate is 10% load reduction per 10% of pressure reduction from max. (don't believe me? check with the NHTSA website, they have an article on that somewhere) If you're planning on carrying a full payload, even the manual tells you to up your tire pressures, what does that imply abt load capacity vs pressure?

The advice to chalk your tire tread and drive to see what the contact patch is, is actually very sound advice and is good.
 

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Not to be contrary, but in recent weeks I saw a report that tire pressure had no effect on gas mileage. The report said for safety reasons you should not allow the pressure to get low. They had tested tires under different pressures. I'll see if I can find it and post it.
Whoever did that report is full of it. Underinflated tires will scrub more than properly inflated tires. This scrubbing is extra friction that the engine has to overcome. The more the engine has to fight this, the more fuel you use and in turn the lower the mpg you get. Think of it as riding the brakes a little. It's the same effect. Or, imagine pushing the vehicle. Would you rather push it with 4 flat tires or with 4 inflated tires? The smaller the contact with the ground, the less friction you have and the easier it is to move. The easier it is to move, the better your overall mpg will be. :tu:
 

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I recall the tire inflation story was on a news program about saving gas. It makes sense that low tire inflation will increase drag. I recall the point of the story was the biggest way to waste gas was to accelerate rapidly and hit the brakes rather than taking it easy while driving.
 

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If tire pressure is too low, the sidewall flexes more than the tire was designed for, heat builds in the sidewall, and the heat and continual flex cycling of the sidewall leads to separation and a destroyed tire.

However, the chicken littles in the mass media (and quite possibly your local tire shop's legal department) would have you believe that anything that sounds low is too low and therefore you should run a hundred million billion pounds of air in your tires for your family's safety so you don't accidentally massacre a busload of nuns or something. In reality, different axle weights and different tire dimensions lead to different ideal pressures for every vehicle. For example...if you and your wife both weigh 300# and you have two kids at ten stone each, plus two bull mastiffs under the Snugtop, your tire pressure needs to be higher than a guy who weighs 180#, carries no passengers or load, stripped the truck and removed most of the sheetmetal for fiberglass. If both scenarios had the same tire pressure, either the empty truck will ride like a buckboard and wear the tires unevenly, or the loaded truck will be punishing the sidewalls and asking for catastrophic tire failure. It changes again if a truck is using very large or very small tires...do it wrong and you'll ruin your tires, or possibly annihilate a third world orphanage for handicapped pregnant children of adopted Peace Corp volunteer nuns when your tire shreds and your truck rolls off the highway.

Do the chalk test for your normal driving scenario...you, kids, dogs, wife, boat, load of sheetrock, etc...and run the high side of the pressure range which shows even contact across the tire. If you usually run unloaded, but max the GVW for trips, do as many chalk tests as you need to identify a good tire pressure for each axle based on the load, and remember that pneumatic tires are a part of the suspension equation...they are not meant to ride like solid rubber tires on a loader or solid rubber "idiot" tubes on bicycles.

-Sean
 

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If I keep my tires inflated to the max will my mpg increase? Will this cause my tires to wear faster? Will it decrease traction on wet roads?
Well, here is my personal experience with tire pressures.

First - 2006 AC, V-8, 2wd, SR5, 17" factory wheels, original stock tires (Dunlop AT20).

I went from the recommended 29/32 to 40/40 and the results were:

1) Gas mileage went from 17.8 to 19.2 on my daily 52 mile each way freeway commute (75% or more with cruise control set).

2) Zero change in comfort levels or noise.

3) Traction has not been tested in anything other than clean, paved road driving other than a few severe rain storms with some standing water hit at freeway speeds - zero changes.

4) Truck has 22,000 miles on it and the tread looks to be maybe half worn or less (did not measure it, just a subjective assessment).

5) Tread is wearing perfectly and I have rotated the tires only once (at the 10,000 mile mark, it is ready for another rotation).

I can't comment on other's opinions but I don't see any reason to change what I'm doing here.

JMHO

Dan
 
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