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Greetings, all, I'm a recent purchaser of a pristine 2008 Sequoia Limited (only 14K miles). Upgrading from our 2005 Expedition tow rig, it's quite a jump in power, comfort, ride, handling, and even gas mileage. But ... the original owners opted for the "burlwood-like" dash trim kit, which I just abhor - I think it looks completely plastic, and don't like the extra depth it adds to certain knobs and switches on the dash.

I'd really like to remove this, but do so without harming the base trim. I understand the kit is held on with nothing more than double-sided 3M tape, but that stuff is sticky. Has anyone successfully removed a wood trim kit, and if so, do you have any advice on how to do so?

I thought about using a hair dryer to try to heat the tape to the point where it would release, but I'm afraid that may also melt the underlying plastic trim.

thanks;
-rob.
 

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For anyone else who may be interested in doing this, I was finally successful: all the plastiwood has been removed, and I didn't damage any of the underlying trim in the process. Here's how I did it.

General tips: Wear gloves, the edges of the trim can be very sharp. Use a very small flathead screwdriver to get under the edge of the trim, and only press up, so you're not scratching the underlying trim surface. Use a utility knife to break the plastiwood at an edge, this makes it much easier to tear.

Large upper panel piece (surrounds the gauges): I just started gently prying on the edge near the door, and on the edge near the air vent on the right. The tape gave way with relative ease; I kept some pressure on the trim behind the panel to prevent it from pulling out. I worked my way in from the edges, and the whole sheet just "popped" and then came right off. There was some residual tape, but it comes of cleanly.

Console cover: This was the toughest one, and would've been easier if I removed the trim. Lacking a trim removal tool, though, I didn't want to try. I started working around the shift lever (near the upper-left corner, where there's a narrow piece) and the tow/haul button area. After loosening these areas a bit, I used my utility knife to cut through the trim, creating pieces that I could pull on. It was slow work, but it eventually came off.

Door panels: Take these off the truck and work on them elsewhere; they snap off with gentle but continuous upward pressure. Unhook the wires, and you can then sit at a worktable. I started on the back edge (which would be closest the door when installed), and found that it easily loosened on all four pieces. Once I had the back edge loose, I then just used my hands and fingers to slowly work around the piece. Occasionally I'd use my knife to cut a piece so I'd have something to pull on. Slow gentle continuous pressure works best.

There may be some sticky tape bits left when you're done, but they roll right off with minimal effort.

With the wood all gone, the truck is now much nicer looking inside.

-rob.
 

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Glad you got that straightened out. That fake wood overlay is horrible on any car. Ugh.
 
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