Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just had this job done at local shop. For some reason they left the key on so my dash cam recorded the job. From hood up to hood down was 1hr 49min... Seems fast to me. Can the job be done in that time period?

Also on the way home discovered AC didn't work, yes we are using our ACs in Az already :) When I got home found they had disconnected the ground wire from the compressor. Was this necessary? Took me awhile to find a 5mm bolt that would fit.

And for those curious it was $701.30 out the door to replace timing belt, water pump & serpentine belt. In Mesa, Az.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,842 Posts
I've done it three times, and it took me about ten hours each time. In fairness, I'm retired and not on the clock.

However ...

A family friend runs his own auto repair shop, he's an excellent and experienced mechanic, and he replaced his in four hours.

So, if two guys were put on the job (more than that would get in each other's way), they were highly trained and experienced in this particular job, and their choreography was perfect, I can see it taking less time.

But ...

It took me an hour and a half just to drain the coolant. When I refilled the coolant, I pre-mixed it distilled water at the proper ratio in a Rubbermaid plastic jug and then poured it in. Doing both took me two hours.

I follow a simple rule: It's better to get it right than to get it right now. I don't know what rule they followed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. They are a Toyota specialist shop... But I'm concerned that under 2 hours is just to quick, and they really didn't replace the timing belt... If it fails 10k miles down the road, no way to blame them...

I'm hoping some Toyota mechanic on here will tell me it can be done in under 2 hours and I'm worried for nothing...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
I'm hoping some Toyota mechanic on here will tell me it can be done in under 2 hours and I'm worried for nothing...
Including replacing the water pump? You would have to go at it like a robot, going straight from one operation to the next with no pauses. To get this good you'd have to do one of these jobs every single day and have an incredibly high level of organization of your tools, parts, etc.

The fact that they removed the compressor ground wire is a positive thing as you can remove the viscous fan bracket more easily by removing the small plate on the front of the compressor. That's a trick I will probably use next time I do a TB.

If you'd asked me how quick a pro could do this job I'd say four hours. Maybe two hours with two guys working together who did this every day. Or one superman.

If this were my truck I'd remove the upper left (driver) side TB cover and take a look at the water pump, using an inspection camera if necessary. A new pump will be shiny metal, an old pump will look gray.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Makes me wonder what else they missed other then a ground wire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The fact that they removed the compressor ground wire is a positive thing as you can remove the viscous fan bracket more easily by removing the small plate on the front of the compressor.
Glad to hear this; I was concerned they did it hoping they would get future business. Thinking I wouldn't use the AC for another month...
This paranoia is what led me to check the dashcam; was surprised they left the key on which let the dashcam record the job.

Was already planning on pulling thermostat to see if water pump was shiny or dulled. Will try your idea of removing left TB cover to inspect the water pump.

I prefer to do the work myself... But apartment complex carport parking is not a great place to take an engine apart. At a minimum I should have asked to see the old belt, wanted to see what the wear was like anyways.

Really kick myself in the ass for not watching job, but they gave me a loaner and told me to go get lunch. Live and learn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,842 Posts
But I'm concerned that under 2 hours is just to quick, and they really didn't replace the timing belt...
That would NOT be my concern. Taking off the old belt and putting on the new belt is quite easy and takes very little time. Spending the time and effort to get to that point without changing the belt is not what I would expect.

My concern would be other things:

1. What else did they replace, such as timing belt idler pulleys/bearings, water pump and gasket, thermostat and gasket, and O-ring and RTV gaskets of the water pump plumbing?

2. How well did they clean up each area before they reassembled it, such as the water pump mount, the RTV gasket area, and so on?

3. Did they let the RTV gasket cure before putting it under heat and pressure?

4. How well did they inspect items while they were there, such as cam and main seals?

5. Did they mix the coolant with distilled water or plain water, and how did they mix the coolant and water to the proper ratio when they filled it, i.e. did they mix it externally and then pour it in, or did they put it some of one, some of the other, and just guess that it was right?

6. Did they check and replace the serpentine belt idler pulley/bearings?

7. Did they properly torque all bolts, or did they just wing it, particularly the crankshaft pulley bolt?​

There are lots of places to shave time, but shaving time shaves quality. Did you get what you paid for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
Glad to hear this; I was concerned they did it hoping they would get future business. Thinking I wouldn't use the AC for another month...
They probably dropped the screw and couldn't immediately find it. When you're working that fast you just say screw it and move on I guess.

Though that attitude is probably indicative of the entire job. Nothing is torqued, cut every corner, if you can get by without the bolt/part, leave it off. Most pros work that way, btw, so don't feel picked on. Every dealership fills dumpsters with plastic undershields removed and not replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
My concern would be other things:

1. What else did they replace, such as timing belt idler pulleys/bearings, water pump and gasket, thermostat and gasket, and O-ring and RTV gaskets of the water pump plumbing?

2. How well did they clean up each area before they reassembled it, such as the water pump mount, the RTV gasket area, and so on?

3. Did they let the RTV gasket cure before putting it under heat and pressure?

4. How well did they inspect items while they were there, such as cam and main seals?

5. Did they mix the coolant with distilled water or plain water, and how did they mix the coolant and water to the proper ratio when they filled it, i.e. did they mix it externally and then pour it in, or did they put it some of one, some of the other, and just guess that it was right?

6. Did they check and replace the serpentine belt idler pulley/bearings?

7. Did they properly torque all bolts, or did they just wing it, particularly the crankshaft pulley bolt?​

There are lots of places to shave time, but shaving time shaves quality. Did you get what you paid for?
Some valid points. Your concerns would be the same even if you went to a dealer to have the work done.
When you hire a mechanic there is a level of trust/faith required.

I didn't go with them because of the price (they weren't the cheapest) I went with them because they have been in business for 13 years in the same location, lots of positive reviews online (only 1 bad review and the spelling was so bad I couldn't take it seriously) and no complaints with the BBB.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
What year is your truck and how many miles on it? If you provided this info earlier I can't find it. The reason I ask is that if your truck is at the recommended mileage interval a Toyota tech would know it's a very safe bet the truck will go another 5 years without a TB change.

Also, when did you leave the shop and when did you return? How many hours were you away?

I'll be honest I am really having a hard time with the idea that anyone could do this job in 1 hour and 49 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
2000 with 215,131 miles (prior TB & WP change at 91k)

I was physically away from the truck ~10am to 1:03 (that's when I signed the CC)
My dash cam recorded them pulling the truck from where I parked it into the bay. The hood went up at 10:43
My dash cam recorded them Pulling the truck out of the bay and washing it, then parking it where I later retrieved it. The hood went down at 12:28

They left the key on but unfortunately with the hood being up all I get on the dash cam is the Hood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
You need to investigate this. Look at the condition of bolt heads in the front of the engine - look for witness marks from wrenches. Take the upper left TB cover off and rotate the engine by hand on the crank pulley bolt (clockwise). A new timing belt will have bright, clear markings. An old belt with that mileage will look good but will have very faint cracks across the belt and the markings will be very faded. A new water pump will be shiny, an old water pump gray.

Let us know what you find.

Edit: For some reason I can't let this go. My first reaction to your story was "maybe," but at this point I'm thinking "no way." That guy looks just as cool and unfussed when he's dropping the hood as when he raised it. I'm very sorry to be so pessimistic but I think all you got was a new serpentine belt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I appreciate you following up. I won't be able to take off the TB cover until Sunday. But this morning in the light I gave it a quick look over before work:

The water pump is new; it is very shiny where the water inlet housing bolts to it and there is new RTV.
Radiator hose clamps and air box clamps have been moved. Both Left and Right TB cover bolts show recent socket marks. Same with the power steering pump mounting bolts.

Radiator bolts don't show any recent marks, is it possible to do the job without pulling the radiator?

Will let you know what the TB looks like Sunday.

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,842 Posts
Radiator bolts don't show any recent marks, is it possible to do the job without pulling the radiator?
Possibly, but it would be very much in the way and thus easily damaged. Once it's drained, pulling it requires removing four bolts, then lifting it up and out. It has tabs built into it that fit into holes in the front firewall, so putting it back in is just as easy; just set it in place, then put in the four bolts.

If they had an air ratchet handy, then not pulling it might save them a whole minute to remove and two to replace. It being in the way would slow them down more than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
I appreciate you following up. I won't be able to take off the TB cover until Sunday. But this morning in the light I gave it a quick look over before work:

The water pump is new; it is very shiny where the water inlet housing bolts to it and there is new RTV.
Radiator hose clamps and air box clamps have been moved. Both Left and Right TB cover bolts show recent socket marks. Same with the power steering pump mounting bolts.

Radiator bolts don't show any recent marks, is it possible to do the job without pulling the radiator?

Will let you know what the TB looks like Sunday.

Thanks
If the water pump is new then they did the whole job. You have to remove the timing belt to replace the water pump so I'm sure you'll find a new belt.

The pros leave the radiator in place, that I already knew.

I am blown away that it's possible to do this job that fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I agree if they did the water pump they probably did the TB; but at this point I'm still going to check.
Will let you know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Could it be possible that they disconnected the negative on the battery cable while working on it, as you should, which would reset the clock on the dash cam? That would put it at 12 o'clock by default and the 38 minutes after could be the time it took to burp the cooling system, check for leaks, etc... But that's assuming you don't have constant footage of the work from start to finish. If it's broken up though then this may be the case. Sorry, just thinking off the top of my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
I have an Alldata DIY subscription for an SUV with a 4.7L, it says 4.0 hours for a timing belt. 4.4 hours for a water pump. 0.3 hours for the drive belt. Here in Cali, some shops would try to double dip on the timing belt and water pump hours because the people wouldn't know any better. They would charge 4 hours for the belt and 4.4 for the pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
It took me roughly six hours to change my timing belt, water pump, and serpentine belt. I also did the idler pulleys and the tensioner too. I'd expect what redwood said to be accurate for an experienced mechanic.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top