Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How much sound deadener would I need to deaden the front doors of my 2007 Tundra DC? I already have some older Edead from elemental designs to do the rear doors but I wanted something better and thicker for the front. How much would you order and what are some good brands ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
819 Posts
I heard that you need 36 sq ft to do all 4 doors on a crewmax. So I say order 18 sq ft or so. I also heard that second skin is pretty good, a guy on here called toyota buzz know more about this stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,966 Posts
Call Ant at Second Skin. Damplifier Pro is a great deadener, I have it in my truck as well as Dynamat Extreme.... I like the Damp Pro much better. One bulk pack should be plenty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
read this website. Don's pretty much re-shaped how we think about sound deadener. very respected.

I contacted him and asked his advice for deadening the doors of my 1st gen Tundra DC, and have included his response below. Hopefully it's helpful. Feel free to contact him with questions. He's very responsive and helpful.

==================================================
From: Don Sambrook - Sound Deadener Showdown <[email protected]>
---------------------------------------------------------------
This thread illustrates my usual approach to doors with speakers:
Kappa Specific Sound Deadening Kits
it also demonstrates two techniques for sealing the access holes in the inner skin. Sealing the holes is important for the performance of door mounted speakers. The ideal cover will be rigid, waterproof and removable.

Applying vibration damper (CLD Tiles) is definitely important here to control panel resonance. Where possible, I also stuff Extruded Butyl Rope between the side impact beams and the outer door skin as an inexpensive and usually very effective additional step add damping and to reinforce the outer skin at its weakest point.

After that, I apply a layer of mass loaded vinyl (MLV) to the inner skin. While this does help with external noise mitigation it also plays an important role in speaker performance. It acoustically reinforces the plane to which the speaker is mounted, decreasing interaction between the front and back waves produced by the speaker, reducing cancellation.

Finally, I add a layer of closed cell foam (CCF) between the MLV and the trim panel. This helps control rattles and buzzes in the trim panel and between the trim panel and the inner skin. Even if you were to decide not to use the layer of MLV, the CCF is still a useful rattle control treatment.

Doors (each):
6 CLD Tiles, outer skin
2 CLD Tiles, cut into smaller pieces, inner skin
Extruded Butyl Rope
6.3 ft² MLV
6.3 ft² 1/4" CCF
3 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Here's the process:
Clean the outer skin thoroughly. No matter how clean the rest of the vehicle is, the inside of the doors is likely to be filthy. I use denatured alcohol on a rag. Wipe it down until the rag comes out clean.

Start by pressing Extruded Butyl Rope (EBR) between the outer skin and the side impact protection beams. Leave gaps every few inches to allow water to drain. Cut some strips from a heavy plastic bag and press them into the top surface of the EBR to protect it from dirt.

Apply half the CLD Tiles allocated to the outer skin above and half below the side impact protection beam. Cut 2 more CLD Tiles into smaller pieces and apply them to the inner door skin.

Hang MLV on the inner door skin using Velcro Patches with pressure sensitive adhesive on both sides. The patches are 2"X4" but you can cut them in half for this application (most applications really). Start with 2 pieces in the top corners to hold the MLV in place while you trim it to fit. You want it to be as large as it can be - just barely fitting inside the trim panel when it is replaced. You will need to cut some holes in the MLV to allow cables, rods, shafts, wires, clips and the speakers to come through. You want these holes to be as small as possible. Every place we use MLV we are building a barrier and a barrier needs to be as large and contiguous as possible.

It helps during the fitting process to periodically remove the MLV from the door and lay it in the trim panel to test fit it. The Velcro makes this easy. When you first hang the MLV on the door, cut holes where the trim panel clips go into the door. You can then use these holes to orient the MLV inside the trim panel.

When you are satisfied with the MLV fit, add two more Velcro Patch pieces to the bottom corners. It's generally a good idea to add a third piece on top for added strength. Finally, use HH-66 Vinyl Cement to tack a layer of closed cell foam (CCF) on the side of the MLV facing the trim panel. When the trim panel is reinstalled, the CCF will compress slightly, getting rid of rattles and buzzes in the trim panel itself and between the trim panel and the inner door skin.

General Notes
HH-66 is a contact adhesive that will only bond materials with vinyl content. That means MLV to MLV, CCF (like the material I sell with vinyl content) to CCF and MLV to CCF. You need to coat both surfaces and let them dry until just tacky, 3-5 minutes. Press the two parts together. The bond is more than strong enough to work with immediately. It will achieve its full strength after a few hours.

Velcro Patches can be cut in half (2”X2”) for all but the most demanding applications. When working with the self-adhesive side(s) of the Velcro Patches press the entire assembly into place. It is a good idea to gently separate the hook and loop sides and press them down by individually to make sure the bond is complete.

As an Order:
It gets a little tricky here. Your trim panels are a little too big to be able to cut two singles pieces from one sheet of MLV. That leaves two choices. You can either use HH-66 to seam pieces together by overlapping 1/2" or I can cut you two pieces that are each 28"X54", meaning you'd waste a 22"X28" area from each one. I'll price it each way.

One Piece MLV:
16 CLD Tiles @ 2.45 = $39.20
1 roll Extruded Butyl Rope @ 8.75 = 8.75

1 sheet MLV @ 35.10 = 35.10
1 sheet 1/4" CCF @ 27.65 = 27.65
3 Velcro Strips, adh. 2 sides, 2-pack @ 3.25 = 9.75
1 8 oz can HH-66 Vinyl Contact Cement @ 8.50 = 8.50

Sub Total: $128.95
Shipping: 23.97
Total: $152.92


Two Pieces MLV:
16 CLD Tiles @ 2.45 = $39.20
1 roll Extruded Butyl Rope @ 8.75 = 8.75

2 28"X54" sheets (21 ft²) MLV @ 2.60 = 54.60
1 sheet 1/4" CCF @ 27.65 = 27.65
3 Velcro Strips, adh. 2 sides, 2-pack @ 3.25 = 9.75
1 8 oz can HH-66 Vinyl Contact Cement @ 8.50 = 8.50

Sub Total: $148.45
Shipping: 33.06
Total: $181.51


You're probably thinking: "I ask this guy for a simple treatment for my doors and he comes up with something that costs almost $200". This treatment is what I do and what many of my customers have done with great results. If you wanted to forgo the benefits of the MLV layer:

16 CLD Tiles @ 2.45 = $39.20
1 roll Extruded Butyl Rope @ 8.75 = 8.75

1 sheet 1/4" CCF @ 27.65 = 27.65
3 Velcro Strips, adh. 2 sides, 2-pack @ 3.25 = 9.75
1 8 oz can HH-66 Vinyl Contact Cement @ 8.50 = 8.50

Sub Total: $93.85
Shipping: 26.59
Total: $120.44


Finally, if you leave out the CCF, you'll get a result similar to the one illustrated in the photo you sent me. The Extruded Butyl Rope will give you a better result on the outer skin. You'll get at least as good a result on the inner skin with much less coverage:

16 CLD Tiles @ 2.45 = $39.20
1 roll Extruded Butyl Rope @ 8.75 = 8.75

Sub Total: $47.95
Shipping: 14.01
Total: $61.96



Payment Options:
Credit or debit card by phone: (410) 458-6418
PayPal to: [email protected]
Check or money order
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
889 Posts
Call Ant at Second Skin. Damplifier Pro is a great deadener, I have it in my truck as well as Dynamat Extreme.... I like the Damp Pro much better. One bulk pack should be plenty.
They have the special on b-stock damplifier pro right now... I have lot of RAAMAUDIO products to be installed.... or else I will get some of the damplifier pro.

Below is the email I got from Ant. for special sale.

Second Skin is offering all DIYMA.com members a discount on a b-stock batch of Damplifier Pro:

You can check out the product here:
Second Skin - Damplifier Pro B-stock Sale

Use this coupon code on all orders over $250 to take an additional 10% off the discount price: 10DPBMM

Orders over $500 get 20% off B-stock Damplifier Pro with this code: 20DPBMM

Check it out in the forum here:
Second Skin Damplifier Pro - SUPER SALE!! - DIYMA.com - Car Audio Forum & 12 volt Community Board
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
how well does this stuff work? I just bought a crew max and when i get on the interstate and go 70 and up i can hear the road quite well, will this take care of that problem for me?

Just putting it on the doors or would i have to do the whole cab as i have seen some people do on here?

Let me know your results with this and what you would you recommend
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
seriously dude, read through this website.... http://sounddeadenershowdown.com/. It will answer those questions. CLD tiles (Dynamat, Damplifier Pro, etc) don't do much for road noise. It is the first step, but not the answer alone. Btw, do not cover your whole cab with that stuff. More than 25% coverage is overkill. That will take care of the resonance, which again, is the crucial first step. Now, to block road noise, cover the whole cab in a Mass Loaded Vinyl barrier (MLV) with another layer of Closed Cell Foam. Do all three of those steps, and your vehicle will be quieter than the President's. Just doing your doors will all of that (and sealing them) will help tremendously if you don't want to do the whole vehicle.

oh, and i'm not affiliated with that website. There are other products out there that do the job just fine, and i've heard good stuff about RAAMAUDIO. It's just a great resource for information on this topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
seriously dude, read through this website.... Sound Deadener Showdown - Your Source for Sound Deadening Products and Information. It will answer those questions. CLD tiles (Dynamat, Damplifier Pro, etc) don't do much for road noise. It is the first step, but not the answer alone. Btw, do not cover your whole cab with that stuff. More than 25% coverage is overkill. That will take care of the resonance, which again, is the crucial first step. Now, to block road noise, cover the whole cab in a Mass Loaded Vinyl barrier (MLV) with another layer of Closed Cell Foam. Do all three of those steps, and your vehicle will be quieter than the President's. Just doing your doors will all of that (and sealing them) will help tremendously if you don't want to do the whole vehicle.

oh, and i'm not affiliated with that website. There are other products out there that do the job just fine, and i've heard good stuff about RAAMAUDIO. It's just a great resource for information on this topic.
Interesting read...anyone try this method? Results and /or opinions?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top