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Would you buy a Tundra Hybrid?

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Discussion Starter #1
(wanted to add, YES!, I saw this same post 6 years ago... Im curious if thoughs have changed...)

I remember hearing back like 2006 with the first camary/highlander hybrids they were planning on doing the same to everymodel... 6 years later nothing has advanced with that? did anyone else hear that? How sweet would a gas/electric engine manual switch option be? Imagine 60mpg in the tundra when you dont need pulling/hauling power!

Toyota Tundra Hybrid Coming, Could Help Hybrid Sales Double by 2015 | AutoGuide.com News

http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.f0e3897

I wonder how much an electric bill would be?
 

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If you wanted to compare the poll result with the previous one, you should've kept the questions consistent.

I would have to see what the hybrid truck by Toyota is like in order to make up my mind.
 

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IF you build them big enough and heavy enough! The power to weight ratio does not compare to gasoline.
i guess what i was trying to say was electric motors generate maximum torque at zero speed, that's perfect for cars where you need the most torque to pull away from a stop.
IC engines generate peak torque about half-way to maximum revs (depends on the design) so you need a gearbox to allow an engine to run at 3000rpm with the wheels turning at 1rpm For a given power/size/cost the IC engine will probably generate more peak torque - which is why you don't see many hybrid bulldozers, but at the same time that is why all trains now are!!
An automobile ICE engine, by design, has to be spinning to make torque. It has to suck in air, compress it, and expel it, and it's not going to do that at 0 RPM. It's not going to do it at 10 RPM either, or even 100 unless it's some huge marine engine. Remember, a piston only makes power 25% of the time, and this power has to pay for the remaining strokes, including compression, which slows it WAY down. So in general, it has to spin at a decent speed to make enough power to be able to even pay for itself. Once it gets there, it has to spin faster to make extra power, and even faster to make the kind of power you want. Depending on design, you'll usually end up being in the thousands of RPM before you get there....

Electric motors, on the other hand...they're just some wires and magnets. You run a current through a wire and it becomes a magnet, which pushes against another magnet and vuoila! you've got force.

The more current you supply, the more force. I'm guessing the greatest current usually runs at 0rpm, since there's practically no resistance in the wires. Once the motor starts spinning, the moving magnetic field slows the current down.
 

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Electric motors definitely do have a higher stall torque than IC motors, and some (servo motors) have an absolutely flat torque curve from zero to max rpm.
Toyota is working on a new hybrid motor that may solve some of the weight problems, but it is not ready for production yet.
Toyota Is Developing New Electric Motors
 

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toyota has been putting motors like this in material handling equipment for a bit now, im not sure what took so long to super size it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you wanted to compare the poll result with the previous one, you should've kept the questions consistent.

I would have to see what the hybrid truck by Toyota is like in order to make up my mind.
Just saying, my question is pretty much the same... "would you want one" is consistent to "would you buy one"... sorry it wasn't identical wording... ease up
 

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It's always seemed to me ... what happens when the hybrid vehicle gets to be 10 years old and older? What about the person who can only afford a vehicle this age and who does his own work to repair his truck? How does he deal with the electrical side? I've had my Tundra 8+ years from new now and I've done many, many repairs myself. When I was a young man raising a family doing my own work was out of necessity. Thank goodness my Dad taught me just about everything about cars. Now in my later years I can afford the cost of any repair but doing it myself is a matter of pride and challenge. For myself I cannot imagine working on an electrical system that can fry your personal bacon if you make a mistake. What happens when the truck needs new batteries? That can't be anything but expensive. A person who knows their way around internal combustion engines can rebuild forever. For me I'll just have a good old-fashioned, thank you.
George60
 

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batteries are batteries! if you can change one, you can change them all. the electrical motors are brush-less a/c, so the hardest repair would be a controller swap! the only hard part about that is the correct software. besides that it is replace exactly as you removed for labor. i am a dad now myself, and if my son is open to it; no repair will stand in his way! anyone that hides behind the i dont know how to card in this day, and age is plan lazy! where asking a question on a forum get multiple answers, and a search will give enough info to do unimaginable things what would stand in your way?
 

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I don't have any problem with the electronics. I design and build them for a living.
The problem is getting the proper information, parts, software, and diagnostic tools. The manufacturers historically don't make that stuff available to the general public so even if you can find them you have to pay outrageous prices.
I currently have an '06 MB Sprinter and the '07 Tundra. NOTHING is common between those two vehicles except metric wrenches.
 

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I don't have any problem with the electronics. I design and build them for a living.
The problem is getting the proper information, parts, software, and diagnostic tools. The manufacturers historically don't make that stuff available to the general public so even if you can find them you have to pay outrageous prices.
I currently have an '06 MB Sprinter and the '07 Tundra. NOTHING is common between those two vehicles except metric wrenches.
wow, i have an 06 sprinter two! does yours have a Governor at 80 also? i have replaced the rear end, two ac condensers, and a few boost hoses, in all its a great vehicle considering how hard i beat it!
 

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wow, i have an 06 sprinter two! does yours have a Governor at 80 also? i have replaced the rear end, two ac condensers, and a few boost hoses, in all its a great vehicle considering how hard i beat it!
Sending you a PM.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
fry your personal bacon
That was funny.... But excellent point!

I wonder the same now that you mention it, would the value drop dramatically to be able to sell a 10y'old hybrid?
 
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