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Im buying a rough country lift kit for my 2000 tundra and I need to either buy or make some skid plates for my tundra. I was also wondering what other mods to do besides diff breathers, 33in x 12.5in. Im limited on money so im thinkin more along the lines of under 400dollar mods. I also need offroad lights for my stock lights dont quite cut it. Bumper up grades etc. so hit it up and thanks for the suggestions. Now check out those two videos. Thats in my 2000 4x4 Tundra Fully stock with only BfGoodwrench Rugged trail tires on it. Toyota's just keep chuging along seeing as mine has 152,454miles on it.

 

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I'd recommend, in this order:

Skip the lift, do it later and put your money in this stuff instead.

Skid plates--get the Skid Row stuff and don't look back.

Sliders--Check out what others here have done. Look at Stubbs Welding, Demello, Bentup, and your local 4WD shop that works with Toyotas.

Bumpers--bug the guys at Shrockworks, seriously. For the rear bumper, you can make your own (or have someone make you one), or get one of the aftermarket units, there are a few available. If you're serious about running around in the dirt, cut your rear quarterpanels and wrap the bumper around the sides. TMS2U, jjc, Dyogim, myself and a lot of other guys have gone this route. RoundOut has a great example of a truck equipped with aftermarket front and rear bumpers, without trimming like we did if you're not interested in cutting the bedsides.

With full trail armor, you don't need a lift...just bull over, around and through everything. Learn how to get by in technical situations without large tires or extended travel, and you'll one-shot everything after you upgrade.

Instead of that lift kit, save for some uniball upper control arms, extended length aftermarket coilovers, a sawzall, welding setup, and welding lessons at the community college, or bribe/convince a buddy to help you. Check out my gallery for what I'm talking about ;). Jon (jjc) was a huge help getting my truck trimmed out the first time, a couple buddies in Dayton helped the second time (they also welded the sliders and bumpers). I don't know what my lift height is anymore, all I know is I have about 10" travel on stock length IFS and 35" tires, and I don't worry about the rub. The SCT guys can tell you all about the performance benefit of uniballs and longer coilovers at high speed, and they work great in the rocks.

Once you've got the uniballs and coilovers installed, look at tires...check out BFG's 295/75/16, but skip the short/wide stuff like the 305/70/16, you'll get better performance offroad from a tall, narrow tire at low pressure than a short, wide tire at low pressure...go with 285/75/16, 255/85/16, 295/75/16, whatever, but don't go that wide unless you need it to support the sidewall at low pressure on a tall tire (ie 315/75/16, 37x12.5R17, 39.5x13.5R17 etc). You'll get better performance in every situation by going as narrow as possible (not more than 85-90%, or so I've read, or the sidewall will fold at low psi) for the height you've chosen.

Until you get to bumpers, all that stuff can be had under 400 bucks a hit. If you go with something simple like a used Daystar spacer kit, you'll get a little more travel, comfortable ride, and you'll be able to fit larger tires without rubbing until you compress the suspension and try to turn the wheels ;).

-Sean
 

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mandzach
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1,263 Posts
I'd recommend, in this order:

Skip the lift, do it later and put your money in this stuff instead.

Skid plates--get the Skid Row stuff and don't look back.

Sliders--Check out what others here have done. Look at Stubbs Welding, Demello, Bentup, and your local 4WD shop that works with Toyotas.

Bumpers--bug the guys at Shrockworks, seriously. For the rear bumper, you can make your own (or have someone make you one), or get one of the aftermarket units, there are a few available. If you're serious about running around in the dirt, cut your rear quarterpanels and wrap the bumper around the sides. TMS2U, jjc, Dyogim, myself and a lot of other guys have gone this route. RoundOut has a great example of a truck equipped with aftermarket front and rear bumpers, without trimming like we did if you're not interested in cutting the bedsides.

With full trail armor, you don't need a lift...just bull over, around and through everything. Learn how to get by in technical situations without large tires or extended travel, and you'll one-shot everything after you upgrade.

Instead of that lift kit, save for some uniball upper control arms, extended length aftermarket coilovers, a sawzall, welding setup, and welding lessons at the community college, or bribe/convince a buddy to help you. Check out my gallery for what I'm talking about ;). Jon (jjc) was a huge help getting my truck trimmed out the first time, a couple buddies in Dayton helped the second time (they also welded the sliders and bumpers). I don't know what my lift height is anymore, all I know is I have about 10" travel on stock length IFS and 35" tires, and I don't worry about the rub. The SCT guys can tell you all about the performance benefit of uniballs and longer coilovers at high speed, and they work great in the rocks.

Once you've got the uniballs and coilovers installed, look at tires...check out BFG's 295/75/16, but skip the short/wide stuff like the 305/70/16, you'll get better performance offroad from a tall, narrow tire at low pressure than a short, wide tire at low pressure...go with 285/75/16, 255/85/16, 295/75/16, whatever, but don't go that wide unless you need it to support the sidewall at low pressure on a tall tire (ie 315/75/16, 37x12.5R17, 39.5x13.5R17 etc). You'll get better performance in every situation by going as narrow as possible (not more than 85-90%, or so I've read, or the sidewall will fold at low psi) for the height you've chosen.

Until you get to bumpers, all that stuff can be had under 400 bucks a hit. If you go with something simple like a used Daystar spacer kit, you'll get a little more travel, comfortable ride, and you'll be able to fit larger tires without rubbing until you compress the suspension and try to turn the wheels ;).

-Sean

For a 2000 Tundra I would agree with everything Sean said. Hard to lift your way out of carnage plus once armored you will enjoy the wheeling so much more knowing your not destroying your truck.
 

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plus once armored you will enjoy the wheeling so much more knowing your not destroying your truck.
So true..I spend so much time maintaining and fixing things that I overlooked/skipped that I hardly have time or money to wheel. You might have a nice looking truck but make sure you leave time (and money) for maintenence, repairs, and neccesary upgrades.

Also...manual hubs would be nice.:tu:
 
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