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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just put Moto Metal 20 inch wheels on my 2010 Tundra. The lugs only turned 6 full revolutions and they were tight. Is this enough. Seemed like stock was probably twice that. Any body have to put longer studs on. I know plenty of you have Moto Metal wheels on this model, specifically Moto Metal 951"s. PLEASE HELP!!
 

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6 turns, eh...i'd still get proper lugs....3-4? no way in hellll i would drive on that.....thats just being dangerous on purpose.
 

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What the heck, you guys are joking right?

Turns has NOTHING To do with properly installing your wheels (or for almost all fasteners for that matter).

Do yourself a favor and go out and buy a well built Foot pound torque wrench. Do not buy a cheap one.

Your goal is to achieve the proper torque on all the lug nuts. It's not even so much about the torque value (although, important)...... it's the fact they are all the same.
 

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I am pretty sure he thinks his lug nuts are to short for his new wheels!!! Six turns would equal six threads. Not enough in my opinion!!!
 

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ah, stud length. I figured that would be obvious. My bad

You should shoot for .75 or 3/4" protruding past the wheel minimum.
 

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The standard rule for fasteners is the the thread depth should be at least equal to the bolt diameter. I would not trust 6 threads.
 

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The standard rule for fasteners is the the thread depth should be at least equal to the bolt diameter. I would not trust 6 threads.
correct.still a little scary,imo.get ET lugs.
 

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Wow My old rims only had 4 turn before tight. But I never had a issue with them. I thought the same thing about if that was enought to hold the rim on at high speeds.
 

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The standard rule for fasteners is the the thread depth should be at least equal to the bolt diameter. I would not trust 6 threads.
what this guy said, that's how nuts and bolts work. and USE A TORQUE WRENCH :angrywife: ya that smiley works for that.
 

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What the heck, you guys are joking right?

Turns has NOTHING To do with properly installing your wheels (or for almost all fasteners for that matter).

Do yourself a favor and go out and buy a well built Foot pound torque wrench. Do not buy a cheap one.

Your goal is to achieve the proper torque on all the lug nuts. It's not even so much about the torque value (although, important)...... it's the fact they are all the same.
I don't know man, but I think there might be some physics to this. The more threads in contact with the lug should mean it would be stronger (to keep from shearing off). I think it would be better to have as many threads sharing the load than just 1 thread. If you torqe down a wheel to 100 pounds on 1 thread I would be worried about that. Think of it like this. If you take a 6 inch wood screw and screw it into wood with only one thread, it is weak. You could pull it out with your hand. Now screw it in 3 inches and see if you can do the same. I know the guy said 6 turns but you said it doesn't matter. So I am making my point by saying 1 thread. I may be wrong, but this is what my minds eye is telling me.
 

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I don't know man, but I think there might be some physics to this. The more threads in contact with the lug should mean it would be stronger (to keep from shearing off). I think it would be better to have as many threads sharing the load than just 1 thread. If you torqe down a wheel to 100 pounds on 1 thread I would be worried about that. I may be wrong, but this is what my minds eye is telling me.
think we are past that. my belief is he thought we were talking abotu once the nut was on there turning it 6 turns to make it tight. and not the fact that theres only 6 turns worth of threads sticking out....but yeah, a torque wrench will do no good if you torque it down with only a few threads. a wheel is the last thing i'd want to have a nut holding on by only a few threads at the end of the bolt.
 

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As suggested above, use a torque wrench... drive a day and check the torque. then a couple days and check it. then a week, etc. If it's staying tight I wouldn't worry about it... but of course it's generally better to have more 'turns' or 'threads'.
 

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think we are past that. my belief is he thought we were talking abotu once the nut was on there turning it 6 turns to make it tight. and not the fact that theres only 6 turns worth of threads sticking out....but yeah, a torque wrench will do no good if you torque it down with only a few threads. a wheel is the last thing i'd want to have a nut holding on by only a few threads at the end of the bolt.
Ya, I missed his update post..whoops. You also quoted me before I edited my post. I hate when that happens!!! :D
 

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Again get the ET lug nuts. Here are the ones that came with my new wheels. They also help center the wheel.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What I ment is the lug nuts only turn on 6 threads (6 full 360 degree revolutions) before they tighten up on the contersinking on the wheel....I would say there is only an about 1/2" of stud sticking out before I start lugs. they are the correct lug nuts that came with the wheels. I guess I am saying it seems the stock studs are to short......
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
OH SWEET.....Those ET lugs are probably just what I need to gain more threads. I am going to call SD Wheels where I purchased and see if they will send me a set. HX for all the info
 
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