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Discussion Starter #1
Our 2012 SR5 was purchased used with about 50K miles. The rear ride height, measured from ground to center of rear fender, is 36 inches. That is 20 inches from center of wheel to fender (with 32 inch OEM tires). Height is uniform from side to side and front to back.

Since there is no positive rake as is common on trucks from the factory, I wondered if the rear end had settled over time. Found two new Sequoias on a dealers lot (an SR5 and a Limited), and measured their ride height. These averaged about 36 inches front and 37 inches rear. So it looks like our relatively young truck is already sagging 1 inch in the rear.

I don't like the loss of ground clearance and the fact that when the truck is loaded up for a trip it squats with a noticeable nose-high stance. Would prefer the slight positive rake when empty.

My questions are:

A) Is this rear-end sag common on 2nd Gen Sequoias? What experience do you have?

B) Is the sag likely to continue to get worse or may it have been caused by someone overloading the vehicle some time and the springs taking a new permanent set that won't change again?

I am considering the following options for lifting the rear end slightly (no more than 2 inches or else will have issues with garage door clearance).

1) Revtek 441R 1.5 inch rear spacers. Concerned that this may only be a bandaid solution that may compromise suspension performance.

2) Get new OEM coil springs. Concerned that these may also sag again over time.

3) New custom coil springs. Probably the best solution technically, if these are higher quality and more stable over time, but more effort required for procurement to the correct specifications.

Your thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
This follow-up on a year-old thread question is provided in case it helps someone out there with similar issues.

As stated above, our (then 4 year old) Gen2 rear coil springs were observed to be sagging, with 1 inch lower ride height compared to new. In November 2015 I installed Coil SumoSprings, p/n CS-1195 (photos below), in hope that they might help somewhat with this issue. I have not seen previously reported results from use of Coil SumoSprings on a Gen2 Sequoia, although there is a detailed thread describing their use on a 2008 Highlander given here:

I think I'm finally done with suspension modifications (Coil SumoSprings Install) - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums

Immediately after installation, the back of the vehicle was observed to be lifted about 0.5 inch. Within about six months of use, the rear was observed to be about 1 inch higher than before installation. So after "settling in" the net result is that the original new vehicle ride height has been restored. I have no idea how or why the ride height has gone up a little over time. But, although the full result was not immediate, it has restored 1 inch of positive rake and has solved the sagging rear end problem to my satisfaction.

As far as I can detect, the ride quality is unchanged. I don't feel any added stiffness in the springs. However, the spring rate is progressive, in that when the vehicle is heavily loaded it does not settle as much in the rear. As a test I loaded 500 lbs of concrete blocks behind the third row. Without the Coil SumoSprings, the back end settled 1.25 inches (measured at the rear axle). With the Coil SumoSprings, the back settled 3/4 inch under the same load. So the truck is no longer nose high when loaded. (With the empty rear ride height now 1 inch higher, the back of the truck when loaded is about 1.5 inches higher than before.)

The nice thing about the Coil SumoSprings is the simplicity of installation (compared to custom springs or coil spacers). No need for spring compressors or realignment. Longevity is a question; the Highlander thread mentioned above has stated that deterioration of the Coil SumoSprings was observed within two years of use.
 

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I personally have tried a number of different spring inserts and never been a fan.

Go with the Revtek spacer and you'll never look back.

I made my own plastic versions a couple years back and they've been great.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I personally have tried a number of different spring inserts and never been a fan.

Go with the Revtek spacer and you'll never look back.

I made my own plastic versions a couple years back and they've been great.

I reached the conclusion that the Revtek spacer is too tall for my needs. I agree a shorter custom spacer may be a good solution long-term, but of course it would not give the progressive spring rate of the Coil SumoSprings. These were intended to be a stop-gap solution until I had time to machine and try out some aluminum spacers. Meanwhile, their performance on the Sequoia has been a pleasant surprise.
 

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My 2012 sequoia still sits 3/4" higher in back but I have noticed it doesn't take much weight to make it sag. I was considering airbags but this looks like the perfect solution for me. Sumo's are on order!

MtnClimber - how did you know which part number to buy? Their website does not list anything for gen2 sequoia.


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Discussion Starter #7
MtnClimber - how did you know which part number to buy? Their website does not list anything for gen2 sequoia.
When I ordered there was a form online that could be filled out and sent in with your measured coil dimensions; the manufacturer then responded as to which part number was the best fit for that application. I see now that ordering has been simplified; the Coil SumoSprings website says:

"The last three digits of the Coil SumoSprings part number indicate the height of the inner wall. So, CSS-1125 has an inner wall height of 1.25″. You want to use Coil SumoSprings that slide in the turns of the coil unloaded and are snug and slightly pre-loaded while the vehicle is on the ground."

The inner height is the only important dimension. Before ordering you should check the spacing between the central coil turns on your truck with the rear wheels off the ground and verify what size is the best fit. My Coil SumoSprings are just snug with the wheels off the ground. You don't want the unloaded fit to be too tight or you'll have extreme difficulty sliding the part in between the coils. Too loose and there is a risk the part will fall out at full droop.

I can confirm that the dimensions of the ones on my truck correspond to the current listed specs for the CSS-1195 model: inner height about 1.95 inches; overall height about 3.25 inches.

There are lots of places online that sell these. I think I paid just over $100 on Jet.com after 15% discount (on your first three orders) and free shipping.
 

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Sumo springs were a easy install and perfect fit. Thanks @MtnClimber ! Raised the back about 1/4". Now I'm exactly 1" higher in back. I can't tell if there is any difference in ride quality because I also went from 20's to 18" wheels w/ blizzak snow tires. I'll see how they do towing in a few weeks.



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Hauled a 27' all aluminum inline trailer with four snowmobiles. The sequoia had a little rear sag even with the sumo springs. Only problem was the headlights were a little too high at night and I got flashes for high beams. This is the most I will ever tow and it's only once or twice a year. Still happy with the sumo springs for the trailers I tow.





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