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I put new brakes on my wife's Rav4 this past weekend. The only thing I hate about doing brakes is trying to get crusted rotors off, after a few Buffalo winters they like to stay on the vehicle. Her Rav was easy because the rotors had M8 tapped holes that I was able to use with a couple bolts to pop the rotors free in seconds. Is there a reason I wouldn't want to drill and tap a couple holes in any rotor for any vehicle before I install them in the future? I can't think of any reason it would really affect any balance issues and it makes the rotors so easy to take off it would be well worth the trouble.
 

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I put new brakes on my wife's Rav4 this past weekend. The only thing I hate about doing brakes is trying to get crusted rotors off, after a few Buffalo winters they like to stay on the vehicle. Her Rav was easy because the rotors had M8 tapped holes that I was able to use with a couple bolts to pop the rotors free in seconds. Is there a reason I wouldn't want to drill and tap a couple holes in any rotor for any vehicle before I install them in the future? I can't think of any reason it would really affect any balance issues and it makes the rotors so easy to take off it would be well worth the trouble.
Drilling when you install the rotors? I think you're asking for them to crack. Manufacturer's had a lot of trouble producing cross-drilled rotors that wouldn't crack--I don't think you could DIY anything that wouldn't also crack.

I would just rent a puller.
CarTech, Inc.: Browsing Using a “Puller” to Remove a Rusted-On Brake Rotor
 

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I don't know about the rotors but the drums have two drilled and tapped holes so you can run a bolt in there to push the drum away from the hub. I did it yesterday so I could clean/inspect the rears on my tundra. If the rotors were crusted on I'd tap them with a rubber mallet.
 
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