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Discussion Starter #1
so when i took my 07 dc 5.7L home from the dealer a couple of weeks ago. the salesman told me to turn the key all the ways and stop right before it would crake over, and let it set there till the warning dings stop and then crake it over, he said this helps with starting it, and puts fuel in the inhectors, he said only if the truck has been sitting for a long time. any turth to this.
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Just because I've never heard about it or read about it doesn't mean it's not true. However, it does sound like typical salesman "help".
 

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I wonder if he got the truck confused with a diesel.

Diesels have glow plugs that you must let "go out" before you try to crank the truck.

-rockstate
 

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Sounds like advice for starting an OLDER diesel motor. The newer ones you can just start unless it is really cold outside... The new rapid heating glow plugs heat up almost instantly. Heck you don't even have to plug them in unless it is below zero outside - as long as you are using winter fuel.
 

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If unable to use a block heater, I do that at -30 or colder and it helps start up faster, the remote start also has a 10 second lag from the time it turns on the ignition to when it cranks the engine.
 

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It does help by letting the fuel pump prime the fuel system before engine cranks. Only helpful if your truck has been sitting for a very long time.
 

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As has been said already, it cycles the fuel pump and primes the fuel system. New FI engines have such good seals in the fuel system that I cannot imagine this doing anything. With my ADD, I'll probably start doing this in my truck now, as it's already a habit with my motorcycle - mostly because I can easily hear the fuel pump cycle on and back off. So, thanks! LOL
 

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Mark it eight, Dude...
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If that is the way you are supposed to start the truck it would say that in the owners manual
+ 1 This is exactly what I was thinking.
 

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It does help by letting the fuel pump prime the fuel system before engine cranks. Only helpful if your truck has been sitting for a very long time.

^^^^ditto^^^^
 

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I remember shopping for my 2000 Tundra, the salesman proudly announced that the iForce engine didn't have sparkplugs; it had igniters. Right. Seems like salespeople are sometimes the least knowledgeable people on the lot!
 

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Not necessary with modern fuel systems. The systems do not lose enough pressure while sitting for the pump not to be able to catch up as soon as the key is turned on. Pure BS....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
i have tried it both aways and haven't notice a differnt on the way it starts, might do that if the truck had been in storge or something for a month or more, thanks every one for you thoughts.
 

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Not necessary with modern fuel systems. The systems do not lose enough pressure while sitting for the pump not to be able to catch up as soon as the key is turned on. Pure BS....
I agree with that. If it has lost enough pressure that it will not start you have a serious leak somewhere that needs to be fixed.:eek:
 

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I used to do this only when my fuel pump on my previous truck was going out. u could hear the pump in the tank push, and it saved a couple of cranks each start. -needless to say i ended up with a new fuel pump and then a starter a few months later.
 

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My truck sits for weeks at a time and fires right up without waiting to crank it over. My pos van on the other hand will loose it's fuel pump prime just sitting a few hours thanks to the horrible fuel system design.
 

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I may be mistaken, but on the past 3 Toyotas I have had, the fuel pump does not get power until the engine is turned over (i.e. when it is cranking). Therefore, leaving it turned into the "ON" position does absolutely nothing. I'm sure GM and other brands are different, but on my Land Cruiser, the fuel pump wouldn't pump until you started to crank the engine. So it won't even prime the fuel system. Also, the fuel lines don't lose pressure when the engine is turned off unless the fuel line is cut. Just my $0.02
 

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Prime the pump! LOL Now that's waaaay old school.
 
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