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So I installed a Toytec lift(3 in front, 1.5 AAL's in back) on my 2wd 06 DC and am very pleased. Truck looks awesome and although the ride isn't like it was stock it still feels great. Along with the lift I also installed a new set of Eagle 102's wrapped with some 285/75/16 BFG's for the complete picture, I say picture because it's mainly for looks for me not 4 wheelin(I mean come on it is a brand new truck, j/k).

Anyhow, with all the work complete I now need to have it aligned. My question is, although I do understand that things have changed under there, is the alignment really necessary. I know the answer to the question(hint, yes!), but after driving this thing I've found it to be straight as an arrow. She neither pulls left nor right and just trucks right on down the road. I do plan on having it aligned and have an appointment on saturday to do so, but am just curious what you all think and looking for discussion. When they do align it should I ask them to align it to DJ's specs(for those of you that are aware of them), or just simply align it.

Also, I noticed through the "search" option that some people have had problems with places wanting to align their lifted trucks. I too had a problem locating a shop to do it. The dealer said they had just received a new alignment machine and although they were unsure on whether or not they could get it perfectly aligned they would come close(crazy). Many places gave me the staright out, nope! The one shop I did find was referred to me by a 4wd shop. When I called and asked about pricing was quoted one $50, price went up when I mentioned it was lifted(not much but every penny counts).

Anyhow, just looking for what you all think.
 

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hey just did the same thing put on a 3" spacer,diff drop,aal's last saturday and i thought to myself why do i need an alignment it drove straight didn't pull left or right my steering wheel was a little crooked turned to the right but drove straight, but the answer is yes you do need to have your truck aligned i had mine aligned tuesday they had only one problem my tires have rim guard which made getting the alignment heads a little more difficult too attach to the wheel but none the less he was able to perform the alignment my camber was good my caster was good but my tow was way out .72 on the right wheel and .27 on the left now the truck is aligned and i have piece of mind that my tires won't wear premature and the steering wheel is centered
 

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Man I like it, it looks goooood! I need to get some pictures up.

Anyhow did you happen to use the specs posted be TS member DJ or just simply asked them to align it? Did the dealer align it and did you experience any reluctance to align it by them or which ever shop you used?
 

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Man I like it, it looks goooood! I need to get some pictures up.

Anyhow did you happen to use the specs posted be TS member DJ or just simply asked them to align it? Did the dealer align it and did you experience any reluctance to align it by them or which ever shop you used?
i work for a toyota dealership i'm an auto painter at the collision center but i didn't have them align it i wen't to my buddys shop who does all the work on my mustang and he had no problem doing the alignment except for the tires getting in the way but he got around that
 

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The truck will have gone too far positive on the camber side, which will wear the OUTSIDE of the tires, and might even squeal on hard turns because the tire is rolling under (extreme cases).

When i align them I bring camber as close to 0* as the adjusters will allow and then get caster as high as possible but i'm not really concerned about caster as long as its even or slightly lower on the left side.

Since camber/caster adjustments affect eacother and toe affects caster, these can be tricky trucks to align. If you have any questions post your alignment printout after its done or e-mail it to me. I'll give oy umy opinion (which isn't gospel of course but i'm guessing i've aligned almost 50 of these trucks in the last 18 months)

High positive camber will give the truck a "twitchy" feeling, it will seem to jump into ruts.

Toe will be out for sure, the truck will track straight because you are lifting equally on both sides so toe, caster and camber will change equally.

Get it aligned for sure, some have slipped by the service dept when the salesmen push a sale or we rush to get it into the showroom and they sell it ignoring the "needs alignment before delivery" warning we have attatched to thestock #.

The owner usually catches some tire wear in a few thousand clicks, or we catch it at the first oil change.

Bottom line, get it aligned, bring camber to 0* or as close to as possible, get caster even, set the toe and its done.

This setup has served me well on the spacer lifts for Tacoma's, Tundras, FJ Cruisers and the new Tundras, even the OME for the FJ and a handful of 6" lifts on both Tacomas and Tundras.

I have my own specs for lifted trucks, you will never get it back to stock with a spacer lift, and just getting it "green" it won't handle well.

Have fun, the 1st gen Tundra with a 2.5" lift and 33's is my favorite lifted truck, would be my personal choice, although the 07 tundra with 2.5" and 35's looks amazing too, just a little too rich for me.
 

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jasonrmorrow, thanks for the great write up on the alignment.

I have a quick question;

Im installing my toytec lift this weekend on my 06 tacoma Dcab 4x4. and I plan on adding upper control arms in the near future (like in 6 months), would I need to realign the truck?

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I've never installed/aligned a truck with aftermarket uppers. Maybe we should look into the UCA/Longer Coilover kits for more serious customers. Right now we mostly deal in the revtek kits and fabtech 6". Trying a 6" pro-comp on a FJ starting monday.

I'm not sure about the alignment after doing the uppers, if they are built to exact stock specs and just allow for more balljoint travel then no you wouldn't need an alignment.

But I'd definately get one done again in 6 months when you do the uppers. This will give the suspension a chance to settle and once the uppers are in it will be your "final setup" so you might as well make sure its nailed. And most times you can take it in for an alignment and if it doesnt need adjustments they'll only charge for a check.

Or call around and find a place thats offering "free alignment checks" or something, then have your specs in hand in case you have to walk them through the job. And if it doesnt need an alignment you're away free !!

I have no idea if this would work...just a funny thought. I like to save my money too !!

On a side note...don't know if this is in the lift instructions...but once you get everything in place....loosen the upper control arm mounting bolt, put a jackstand under the control arm and load the suspension with the full wait of the truck. Then tighten up the UCA bolt. This sets the bushings at their new position. They are constantly stressed at rest if you dont.
 

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With uniball uppers, you can align to DJ's numbers at ~3" of lift at the LCA. I don't remember if this holds true with stock uppers.

AFA the stock uppers...

Lifting by changing the angle of the LCA reduces caster AND camber. Dunno where you're seeing wear on the outside of the tire due to an increase in camber, it's more likely due to the increase in toe angle since the position of the tie rods in relation to the LCA pivot points causes a change in toe as the suspension cycles, increasing the angle as the suspension extends, which IIRC increases wear on the outside edge.

The LCA rides almost flat (depending on how your rear end sits). The UCA has a slight positive angle of attack. This means bumps are a little softer and the suspension is a little more stable when you hit a big bump. The LCA is a little longer than the UCA. When the suspension extends, or you lift the truck by increasing the downward angle on the LCA, the top of the spindle rotates forward about the LBJ due to the positive angle of attack of the UCA (decreasing caster), as well as rotating inward (decreasing camber) due to the top of the suspension's parallelogram (UCA) being shorter than the bottom.

The same is true even if you add uniball uppers, since the UCA remains shorter than the LCA.

If you guys are close to jasonrmorrow take it to him :tu:. It's not easy to find someone who's willing to deal with a lifted truck, and it helps if both you and the guy doing the work know the effect of the lift and the expected outcome of the alignment.

Read over DJ's comments when you have a chance.

-Sean
 
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