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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone loaded a full size touring motorcycle (+750 lbs) motorcycle in their ’07 Tundra? The reason for my question is I plan on loading my bike in the truck in a few weeks so that I can take the bike on vacation with me and it seems like the tailgate (tailgate access panel mainly) may be a problem as far as strength/rigid. I plan on putting down a sheet of ¾” plywood to help add strength and distribute the load since the rear wheel will be on the tailgate. Would like to hear suggestions from anyone who has done this.

thanks
 

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Has anyone loaded a full size touring motorcycle (+750 lbs) motorcycle in their ’07 Tundra? The reason for my question is I plan on loading my bike in the truck in a few weeks so that I can take the bike on vacation with me and it seems like the tailgate (tailgate access panel mainly) may be a problem as far as strength/rigid. I plan on putting down a sheet of ¾” plywood to help add strength and distribute the load since the rear wheel will be on the tailgate. Would like to hear suggestions from anyone who has done this.

thanks
I hauled my harley all over the west in the bed of my 2002 dc tundra. I did exactly what you are planning...put it on a piece of plywood to distribute the weight. Worked great. I don't think my 2007 tailgate is any weaker so I am betting it will work out fine for you. Have fun.
 

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Has anyone loaded a full size touring motorcycle (+750 lbs) motorcycle in their ’07 Tundra? The reason for my question is I plan on loading my bike in the truck in a few weeks so that I can take the bike on vacation with me and it seems like the tailgate (tailgate access panel mainly) may be a problem as far as strength/rigid. I plan on putting down a sheet of ¾” plywood to help add strength and distribute the load since the rear wheel will be on the tailgate. Would like to hear suggestions from anyone who has done this.

thanks
I did have my 700lb Kawasaki Utility ATV in my 2000 Tundra but then again, that's four wheels versus two. But think about it... I was riding my 700lb ATV on a ramp connected to my tailgate and I weighed 260lbs at the time (240lbs now). So combined weight that's almost 1000lbs including the ramp. I do not think it will be any problem. The guy at Bellevue Kawasaki has a long bed Chevy Colorado and he delivers Cruisers that weigh over 750lbs. I would not recommend riding it up, but pushing the bike up and down should be no problem for the Tundra.

What kind of bike do you own? I'm a motorcyclist too. I have a 2005 Kawasaki ZZR1200 which is in the shop because I broke the speedometer after hitting 160mph. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would not recommend riding it up, but pushing the bike up and down should be no problem for the Tundra.

What kind of bike do you own? I'm a motorcyclist too. I have a 2005 Kawasaki ZZR1200 which is in the shop because I broke the speedometer after hitting 160mph. :D
I have a Harley Touring bike (Road King) so no 160MPH for me.
Also, I will be riding it up...no way can I push it up the ramps. With me and the bike we are real close to 1000lbs (maybe a little over)
I was one of those who swore that I would never trailer/truck my bike, but things change and to get in some riding time sometimes you do what you have to do.

thanks for the feedback bgil & Sequoia2003
 

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I have a Harley Touring bike (Road King) so no 160MPH for me.
Also, I will be riding it up...no way can I push it up the ramps. With me and the bike we are real close to 1000lbs (maybe a little over)
I was one of those who swore that I would never trailer/truck my bike, but things change and to get in some riding time sometimes you do what you have to do.

thanks for the feedback bgil & Sequoia2003
The safest way for you to load the bike would be to find a local loading dock that is the right height, and just push or ride right in at the same level or the ramp may be slightly up or slightly down. Most local guys would be cool about a Harley rider using their dock for 5 min.

Another way is to find a steeper driveway or hill, park the truck down hill and as flat as possible from the bike, this will make for a more level ramp to load into the truck. I am lucky at least in this way, my driveway is very steep. I can park my truck on the flat road in front of the drive way and my 6 ft ramp is level with the bed of the truck. Nice for loading and unloading bike, but sucks when it snows.
 

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I have a Harley Touring bike (Road King) so no 160MPH for me.
Also, I will be riding it up...no way can I push it up the ramps. With me and the bike we are real close to 1000lbs (maybe a little over)
I was one of those who swore that I would never trailer/truck my bike, but things change and to get in some riding time sometimes you do what you have to do.

thanks for the feedback bgil & Sequoia2003
I have a Heritage Softail Classic which is about the same size/weight as your RK. I have not had in the bed of my 07 yet, but hauled it a few times in the back of my 03 Tundra with no problem. I have one of those long wide (foldable) ramps which makes it easy to load. As long as you have a ramp wide enough to put your feet down then riding it up is no problem. The back wheel will rest partly on the gate but putting a thick piece of plywood or metal underneath will distribute the load. I also have a wheel chock mounted on 2x12. The 2x12 is the width of the bed and gets wedged in place. This way i don't have to mount the chock to the bed. I actually hate coming down worse than going up. Backing an 800 lb bike down a steep ramp can be tricky. Just go slow and keep constant pressure on the front brake. Good luck.
 

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Have you ridden your bike up a ramp into the back of a truck before?
I've thought about it, but never tried it. It just doesn't sound like a good
idea to me. Maybe if I had a wider ramp that I could put my feet down on
both sides, but at that height and angle, if I were to stop on the way up,
that bike is gonna come down one way or another. And, speaking of coming
down. Now that I think about it, coming down would be, I think, more scarier.
Maybe a wider longer ramp would work?

I dunno, maybe just a smallish trailer instead.

I have a 550lbs Honda Shadow Spirit, 1100cc.

No nice ditches, or inclines or ramps in my area, so a trailer might be best.
Although the back of the truck would be cheapest!

bb
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The ramps I will be using are 10' long and they are 38" wide so yea, I will be able to put my feet down. When I said ride it up what I really meant was I would be on the bike and let the motor pull it up, but "duck walking" it up and down.
I like having the bike in the back of a truck rather than on a trailer. Sometimes a trailer is a PITA and the wife hates driving with the trailer during those time I want to ride the bike.
Milestogo- I agree going up is a lot easier than coming down.
Mxsjw - It would be nice to find a loading dock, but sometimes where I go they are hard to find. And even harder to find one close to the correct hight that you need. Even with the loading dock I still have to go on the tailgate and that was my main concern.
thanks to all
 

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I have a Harley Touring bike (Road King) so no 160MPH for me.
Also, I will be riding it up...no way can I push it up the ramps. With me and the bike we are real close to 1000lbs (maybe a little over)
I was one of those who swore that I would never trailer/truck my bike, but things change and to get in some riding time sometimes you do what you have to do.

thanks for the feedback bgil & Sequoia2003

Awesome bike!!! My neighbor has the exact same bike and we ride together often. Though we look like the odd couple with his black leather, V Twin, cromed out Harley and me with Sport Touring gear riding a Sport Touring Japanese bike. We hash on each other, but in the end it's all about riding two wheels. We are trailering our bikes for Sturgis this year, are you going too?

Back to the bike.... Hmmm... I'm betting that the Tundra will have no problem at all with you and the bike, but a second opinion is definately worth it. It would be tragic if the tail gate snapped with you 1/2 way up the ramp. :eek: My old 2000 Tundra held up to my 300lb brother in law riding my 700lb ATV up the ramp! :D

Also.... Remember it's not all 1,000lbs on the tail gate. The ramp bottom will be holding some weight too as you ride the bike up. The higher you go up the ramp the more weight will be distributed from the ramp to the tail gate. How much? Good question? Any engineers?
 

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I was thinking of some ways as I was reading but everyone summed it all up before I could get in on this. is your truck 4x4? if it is just look for a nice ditch to unload during your travels because I know for a fact that comming down is alot harder I've dropped my YZ250 a couple times comming down a ramp but thats a dirt bike there ment to fall.:D
 

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Have you ridden your bike up a ramp into the back of a truck before?


rode mine up! but my ramp is almost 4 feet wide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
rode mine up! but my ramp is almost 4 feet wide.
Nice looking bike. I wish my ramps were that wide and that my bike fit in the bed without the rear wheel resting on the tailgate.
I'm guessing you didn't have any problems with any of the metal bending on the tailgate when you went across it.
 

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The reason for my question is I plan on loading my bike in the truck in a few weeks so that I can take the bike on vacation with me and it seems like the tailgate (tailgate access panel mainly) may be a problem as far as strength/rigid.
I have noticed this too. The access panel seems kinds flimsy compared to the rest of the tail gate and bed. I had my work shoes on and walked across the panel and put a dent in it. That kind of scared me. I'll try avoid putting a lot of pressure on that area in the future. I think it will hold up to your bike but it may look a little worse for wear doing so. Structurally I think it will be fine.
 

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Looks like a late-model Yamaha R6 track bike (note the lack of turn signals, etc.), so the slick would be just about right (unless you are running supersport, or it's raining at the track of course!).

Cool, neat to see it the back of a new Tundra. Hope the lack of bodywork isn't from a recent crash! :p

Earlier posters arer right though, stripped down to race weight (it's a light bike to begin with), it probably weights as much as the drivetrain on the Harley (!), so not a good tailgate test, but it's a start.

The recommended weight on the tailgate should be available information. They'll typically take quite a bit though. In an emergency situation, I put about a 450 pound bike on the back of my 1990 Toyota pickup without a problem.

In general though, I prefer a trailer. I have one that stands up and rolls vertically against the garage wall. As far as what to do when you unload the bike "on location", one possibility is that you might be able to get a single bike trailer that is either small enough, or will break down to be small enough to put in the back of the Tundra when you aren't using it!

But admittedly, that wouldn't be as cheap as a ramp...;)
 

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Is that a slick on the rear? I'd hate to get caught in the rain on that thing. I would also suggest some ratchet style straps.
it is a TRACK BIKE which isn't street legal. also, slicks aren't just dangerous in the rain but in the dry as well. the reason people don't use them on the street is because you can't get them up to operating temp and keep them there.

also, those are ratchet tie downs.

tahnks for trying to give me advice though, buddy! lol
 

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Nice looking bike. I wish my ramps were that wide and that my bike fit in the bed without the rear wheel resting on the tailgate.
I'm guessing you didn't have any problems with any of the metal bending on the tailgate when you went across it.
no problems, but my bike is only 330lbs dry.
 

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Looks like a late-model Yamaha R6 track bike (note the lack of turn signals, etc.), so the slick would be just about right (unless you are running supersport, or it's raining at the track of course!).

Cool, neat to see it the back of a new Tundra. Hope the lack of bodywork isn't from a recent crash! :p

But admittedly, that wouldn't be as cheap as a ramp...;)
bingo, 2006 r6 track bike... lack of body work due to recent crash haha. she's already back on the track. that pic is a couple months old.
 
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