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Discussion Starter #1
Ive been running Mobil 1 (5w-20) for 2yrs. Considering moving to Mobil 1 (0w-30). I was thinking it might help my fuel mileage a little bit. Let me know your thoughts or your experience if you are already using it.
Thanks in Advance,
j
 

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Probably could hurt your mileage if anything, but bets are you will not see any difference. I've alway run M1 5-20 and the dealer mistakenly put in 5-30 and I raised a ***** but did not have time for them to change it again at that time. Ended up leaving it in and really felt no difference and mileage was the same. Spent the money for royal purple and the results were the same also. Think they call for the lower viscosity (20) vs 30 to help there mileage ratings and such , but I have not seen the difference. IMHO
 

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I doubt you will notice any performance or mileage difference. In fact the 30 rating may indicate a higher viscosity (thicker) at operating temperature, which may reduce efficiency by the smallest amount.
 

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I don't see how moving to a heavier weight oil is going to improve your mileage. If you look in your owners manual it says: "SAE 0w-20 is the best choice for good fuel economy". I would think if 0w-30 got better fuel economy, that would be the oil they would recommend. After all, it's in their best interest to get good fuel mileage too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for you input. Ive always wanted to run 0w-20 since the beginning; but seems at all the walmarts I buy at, they never have 0-20 on the shelf, only 5-20. Though I have started to notice 0-30 on the shelves, this is the reason I ask the question.
Thanks
 

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Thanks for you input. Ive always wanted to run 0w-20 since the beginning; but seems at all the walmarts I buy at, they never have 0-20 on the shelf, only 5-20. Though I have started to notice 0-30 on the shelves, this is the reason I ask the question.
Thanks
I use Mobile 1 0w-20 in my Tundra. I find it at Schucks Auto, which I think is now Checker Auto.
 

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Do you understand the difference between 0-20 and -5-20 ?

I have never run 0-20w in my Tundra,only 5-20w
If you like the performance of your motor you will regret using 30w,you will feel it the first time you nail the pedal

Thanks for you input. Ive always wanted to run 0w-20 since the beginning; but seems at all the walmarts I buy at, they never have 0-20 on the shelf, only 5-20. Though I have started to notice 0-30 on the shelves, this is the reason I ask the question.
Thanks
 

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I'll be honest, I don't know the difference, or the ramifications.
Do you understand the difference between 0-20 and -5-20 ?
 

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the difference between 0w20 and 5w20 is the flow of the oil at startup. The 0w will flow better at cold temps over the 5w. At operating temperature, they flow the same, hence the 20.
By putting in a 0w30 you will get better start up flow, but a higer viscosity at operating temp, in theory hurting gas mileage.
Go to mobils website and read the data sheets.
You want a 0w20 or a 5w20 syn.
 

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Toyota literature claims that 0W-20 synthetic will improve mileage 0.4 - 0.6 MPG compared to 5W-20 conventional. However, the 0.5 MPG saving is offset by the extra cost of 0W-20 synthetic.

Example: 5000 miles @ 18.5 miles per gallon = $676 in gas (at $2.50 per gallon)
5000 miles @ 19.0 miles per gallon = $657 in gas

Gas savings = $19

7 quarts of 0W-20 synthetic oil @ 6.30 per quart = $44.10
7 quart of 5W-20 conventional @ 3.00 per quart = $21.00

Added expense of 0W-20 synthetic oil = $23.10

Fleet car managers know all this and thats why nearly all of them use conventional oil instead of synthetic.
 

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the difference between 0w20 and 5w20 is the flow of the oil at startup. The 0w will flow better at cold temps over the 5w. At operating temperature, they flow the same, hence the 20.
By putting in a 0w30 you will get better start up flow, but a higer viscosity at operating temp, in theory hurting gas mileage.
Go to mobils website and read the data sheets.
You want a 0w20 or a 5w20 syn.
I've often wondered what the diff is. Well put. Points sent.
 

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Toyota literature claims that 0W-20 synthetic will improve mileage 0.4 - 0.6 MPG compared to 5W-20 conventional. However, the 0.5 MPG saving is offset by the extra cost of 0W-20 synthetic.

Example: 5000 miles @ 18.5 miles per gallon = $676 in gas (at $2.50 per gallon)
5000 miles @ 19.0 miles per gallon = $657 in gas

Gas savings = $19

7 quarts of 0W-20 synthetic oil @ 6.30 per quart = $44.10
7 quart of 5W-20 conventional @ 3.00 per quart = $21.00

Added expense of 0W-20 synthetic oil = $23.10

Fleet car managers know all this and thats why nearly all of them use conventional oil instead of synthetic.

Whilst your math is correct I believe you're missing an important point. You can go beyond 5000 miles between oil changes using syn. I have read here that people regularly go beyond 5k oil changes and some of the makers of the syn oil claim you can go up to 25k before changes. I plan to change oil at 10k with a basic filter change at 5k. So the Gas savings would double to ~$40 and the cost of the oil per change would drop to ~$22 per 5k compared to $21 per 5k using dino oil (using your costs). If you went to 15k between changes you'd be golden.
 

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Viscosity goes UP with heat? I must say that is counter intuitive and illogical.

Its a chemistry thing. There are large molecules in the oils that ball up when cold and act like molecular ball bearings, meaning that they don't interact with (stick to) each other. This thinner oil helps get oil where it needs to go faster on a cold startup, but it doesn't protect as well. The thinking is, on a cold/dry start getting more oil flowing faster is more important than getting the best protection.

When they get hot, the unfold into long chains. These chains tent to stick together like velcro, and when they stick, the make the oil thicker by arranging themselves into long/large associations of hundreds of individual molecules. These thick layers of molecules protect the surfaces of motor better, but don't flow as well. The thinking here is that you are continuously lubricating the motor and not fighting a dry start up, so getting optimum surface protection is better.



P.S. to the original poster (i lost track of who is who) It looks like you live in texas. you don't need 0w-20, it never gets cold enough for that to have any advantage over 5w-20. I'm surprized you can find ANY 0w-20 in texas.
 

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What get me is that my Wallyworld has the 5 Quart jugs of 0-30w for $23. but not the 0-20w i have to buy it at i think 6.67 or somewhere around their. Does any one know if Mobil-1 make's the 0-20 in the five Quart jugs?
 

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Its a chemistry thing. There are large molecules in the oils that ball up when cold and act like molecular ball bearings, meaning that they don't interact with (stick to) each other. This thinner oil helps get oil where it needs to go faster on a cold startup, but it doesn't protect as well. The thinking is, on a cold/dry start getting more oil flowing faster is more important than getting the best protection.

When they get hot, the unfold into long chains. These chains tent to stick together like velcro, and when they stick, the make the oil thicker by arranging themselves into long/large associations of hundreds of individual molecules. These thick layers of molecules protect the surfaces of motor better, but don't flow as well. The thinking here is that you are continuously lubricating the motor and not fighting a dry start up, so getting optimum surface protection is better.

Excellent explanation from the good doctor. And something else no one has brought up...this designation 0w-20 or 5w-30 indicates a blend of a cold oil and a warm oil (my designation). The first number with the "w" is the cold number. A zero "w" oil will work well at extremely low temps and the other number will work well at higher temps. In the past I've used 10w-40 in the summer and 5w-30 in the winter. The designers of the Tundra engine have determined that the lower weight winter oil is needed. But you wouldn't want to put say a straight zero weight oil in it, any high temperatures you see would possibly destroy the engine or some part of it. Same for a high weight only, say 40. Its cold performance would be terrible and possibly damaging. And one final little bit about our fabulous 5.7 - according to the manual, a "dry" engine takes ~8.9 quarts and a full change with filter takes ~7.4 quarts. So ~1.5 quarts remain in the little pockets throughout the engine to lube everything right at the start. And the zero "w" is pretty thin and will quickly keep everything lubed to prevent start up wear. I love this truck. :D
 
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