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Jedi Ninja in Training
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So, I am an avid motocross rider and will need to install a bedrack when I receive my DC next month.

I am thinking about the bedbuddy. CCR Sport

Can someone measure the height and depth of the Deckrail system for me and the inside width of the bed at the cab?

Does anyone know if the Titans Utilirack components will fit ours?

Man I can't wait for this thing, just got word mine is built and waiting to be shipped out of TX.
 

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That looks like a really nice bike rack. You should also check out the Universal Sampson rack if you only carry two bikes. I have one and it works great (in my old Chevy, I have not tried it in the Tundra yet). It's made of aluminum and is very light, yet strong.

I was thinking of using the deckrail system in the Tundra. Is it not strong enough to tie down motorcycles or are you wanting the wheel chocks too?
 

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Tommy,
Keep me updated on what you find. I'm VERY interested in this as well, since I'm buying this truck soley for towing a toy hauler and using it for my motorcycle when my family doesn't come along. I looked at the deck rail cleats, and although they appear strong...I'm not sure I'd trust them. I've already had one bike fall off my trailer, and don't want that to happen again :cry:

Keep me posted!
Gary
 

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Okay, it looks like at least a couple of us are interested in this now and I can't find anything using the search feature...SOOOO...does anyone know how many pounds the deck rail cleats are rated for?
 

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Jedi Ninja in Training
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Discussion Starter #5
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document.write(bodytext);Improve the utility of your bed with adjustable tie down cleats. Load rated to 220lbs.

From toyota's website, two will hold my 220lb Yamaha 450F just fine:tu:
 

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document.write("
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document.write(bodytext);Improve the utility of your bed with adjustable tie down cleats. Load rated to 220lbs.

From toyota's website, two will hold my 220lb Yamaha 450F just fine:tu:
I guess I out of luck with my 600lb ZZR:cry: nutz the trailer it is
 

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It's not how much your bike weighs...it's how much force you're pulling on it. You can lightly compress your forks and hardly put much pressure on the cleats, or you can really crank them down (ie: using a fork support).

I'd have to do some tests to see how much force is really being applied when my forks are 1/2 compressed. My guess is that the cleat strength is fine...but I really don't know. I wish it was as easy as determining your bike weight, then dividing by the total number of cleats used...but it's not that simple.
 

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One other note:
Can you really get a tie-down end inside one of those cleats? It doesn't look like it has much clearance.
 

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There is room for several tiedown hooks in there.

About the ZZR, you aren't supporting all it's weight, you are compressing the forks to keep it balanced. You should be able to easily tie it down with 2 tiedowns. If you feel better use 4 tiedowns. Normal side loads during turns shouldn't exceed the rating of the tie down device. Unless you are pulling 2g turns that is!

I do not condone what temeculaseg says about lightly tying down the bike. One good bump could compress your forks enough to allow slack in the tie downs. If one, or both, were to pop of you would be very upset with yourself. Tighten the straps until the forks are firmly compressed.
 

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Jedi Ninja in Training
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Discussion Starter #11
If one, or both, were to pop of you would be very upset with yourself. Tighten the straps until the forks are firmly compressed.
I've seen this happen, I always use a fork support.

You should always tie down for the worst case scenerio...evasive manouvers, accidents, hard braking, hard turns etc. Just because it will hold the bike in place, does not mean it will keep it there if something happens. Tieing down for double the objects weight is best.

Now for the cleats, you can bet that the 220 # is for a straight pull test, not angled or at 90 degrees. Just a little food for thought.

Anyone get me some measurements yet?
 

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I'm definitely not recommending to lightly compress the forks. I'm also not recommending you over crank them either, as that will cause your seals to start leaking. I personally use the fork supports, so I can crank it down hard without compressing my forks too much. :tu:

BTW mln, I'm glad to hear there's room for tie downs to squeeze in. Have you been hauling bikes with your '07? If it seems to be working for you, I'll probably just stick with the stock cleats.

Thanks!
 

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Super Genius
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I was very confident about using the factory tie-down cleats for just about any load. They appear strong and lock in place solidly when tightened down. Then when I had LINE-X installed and I saw how easy the tracks were to remove (only a few small sheet metal screws holding each track to the bed wall) and I was not so confident. Especially when the self-tapping sheet metal screws tend to lose some grip upon removal and reinstallation, or upon frequent heavy usage. I also thought it was odd that they didn't have lock washers. I guess you could drill a few holes and add some more bolts to reinforce the rails but I don't plan to haul anything that requires extreme tie down force anyway so I figured I wouldn't bother. Seeing this thread made me do some research on tie down forces and limits. Here is what I found:

The following info is from another similar thread for the Tacoma which was reportedly confirmed by Toyota via email:

Mini Tie Downs (attached to bedrail) = 110 pounds each
Bed Cleats or Tie Down Cleats (attached to bedrail) = 200 pounds each
D Rings (mounted to lower bed wall) = 440 pounds each

I assume the above info is also true for the Tundra since the rails, cleats, and rings are the same size and type on both trucks. This means that each factory cleat is good for 200 lbs. of force and each ring is good for 440 pounds, thus you have a total tie-down capacity of 2,560 lbs. of force if you used all 8 tie-down points simultaneously. This sounds like more than enough muscle for all hauling jobs unless you carry a lot of weight with a high center of gravity and you hit the turns hard and fast.

This made me curious about the actual force which would be applied to the tie downs when hauling various objects so I did some more checking. It turns out that the actual tie down force required to secure a load is based on many factors including the acceleration / deceleration force measured in Gs, the weight of the load, the amount of friction between the load and the vehicle, the material used for the tie down, the placement of the tie downs, center of gravity, angle of the tie downs, etc.

It gets pretty complicated and there is actually a very detailed standard published here with all the rules and recommendations. I also found a simple calculator here but it is based on tie downs made of chain. Basically you need to be aware of the working load limit (WLL) rating for your tie down and you need to follow the guidelines for your specific type of load.

If someone has found a better calculator for common pickup bed loads then please share. My guess is that Toyota and other vehicle manufacturers probably wouldn't put tie down points in the bed if they weren't capable of securing the maximum loads to be hauled by the truck, so to be safe you should use all the available tie downs including the rings and use high quality straps or ratcheting ties.
 

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I haven't put a bike in the back yet. I have a trailer that I take when the whole fam damily goes. Eventually I will use the rail system.

The rail system is not installed with self-tapping sheet metal screws. They are about 1/4" torqs fasteners that go into pre-intalled nut-plates. They won't rip out going over a bump!
 

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Jedi Ninja in Training
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Discussion Starter #15
The rail system is not installed with self-tapping sheet metal screws. They are about 1/4" torqs fasteners that go into pre-intalled nut-plates. They won't rip out going over a bump!
Now that sounds better, the other guy must not have seen them right.

Will you through a tape measure on it for me, I ride every weekend, and want to make sure that bed buddy will work and get it here before my truck arrives.

Thanks
 

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Now that sounds better, the other guy must not have seen them right.

Will you through a tape measure on it for me, I ride every weekend, and want to make sure that bed buddy will work and get it here before my truck arrives.

Thanks
Throw a tape on what?
 

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Jedi Ninja in Training
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Discussion Starter #17
Throw a tape on what?
The width of the inside of the bed, right under the rail system, against the cab.
and
The depth of the rail system, the actual "C" channel, face to bed wall.

Thanks again
 

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I just bought an 03 Tundra Ltd Access Cab split leather bench w step side bed that already had a sprayed-on liner. I am ordering from Nissan the Utili-trac rails (only the two that mount in the floor of the bed) and 4 cleats to retrofit to my truck. The local Nissan dealer said he would sell them to me at wholesale for 3 bills which includes the two rails, mounting hardware, 4 cleats and 2 vinyl covers that slide over the rails when not in use. I am also putting an A.R.E. LSII tonneau on the bed.
 

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I traded in a Titan for my Tundra. I've hauled bikes all over the western US using the track system in the Titan and it was rated for 200 lbs. The ones in my Tundra are rated for 220, but the actual track doesn't seem nearly as strong, and it deflects and twists considerably when pulled up at an angle. I haven't used it to hold a bike yet, and I think I am going to buy the one rail for the front from Nissan and install it at the front of my Tundra. It was a much more sturdy system. Thats about the only thing I miss from my Titan!!
 

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I also use a Baxley Sport Chock to hold the front wheel of my street bikes. Provides alot of stability so I don't have to compress the forks as much, and I put a piece of wood between the chock and the front of the bed(or the tire of my dirt bike and the bed) to distribute the load.. I've permanently deflected the front of a few truck beds from constant bike hauling. It works great and isn't something that has to be permanently installed in the bed, and is nice for holding bikes in the garage or in the pits at the track as well.
 
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