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Soo I go to start my truck last night and it doesnt do anything soo I open the hood and start looking at the battery terminals and the negative cable is corroded as far down as i could strip it. I was wondering where the negative cable goes connected to? I have a 00 Tundra with the 4.7L. Thanks in advance
 

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It probably goes to the body and then down to the altnator chasis. What i would do to fix it would be just to cut it back couple inchesof the old wire and get some 4 gauge wire and some terminals and splice in a new wire with a new terminal. i wouldn't worry about replacing the cable just the end that connects to the battery.

Andrew
 

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You're going to have to trace the wire to its grounding point. I looked in the manual but it only shows that it goes to ground and not where it's located at.
 

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its going to be hard to trace the wire because it gets bundled right by the battery with a bunch of other wires so you will have to tear apart the bundle to trace the wire. if your dead set on replacing the wire i would get some wire and attach the body, frame and engine to the negative battery post. i am afraid if you go with the dealership they will replace the entire bundle which could be expensive since it looks like the bundle has the alternator and starter wires and some other ones all shrink wrapped together. i would just replace the the corroded end.

Andrew
 

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It should be attached at the left rear of the engine block just ahead of the transmission. It isn't rocket science. Stick your
head under the truck and look. A bad ground is about the most problem causing electrical malfunction you can have. From
not starting to burning components up. You aren't supposed to run these trucks with the battery disconnected, that's exactly
what you'll be doing if it gives out going down the road. The old Fords were famous for dying going down the road from a
corroded battery post, and yes they would start and in a few miles go bad.
 

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It should be attached at the left rear of the engine block just ahead of the transmission. It isn't rocket science. Stick your
head under the truck and look. A bad ground is about the most problem causing electrical malfunction you can have. From
not starting to burning components up. You aren't supposed to run these trucks with the battery disconnected, that's exactly
what you'll be doing if it gives out going down the road. The old Fords were famous for dying going down the road from a
corroded battery post, and yes they would start and in a few miles go bad.
What kind of old Fords are you talking about? I've had several and still have a couple of them. That's one problem I've never run into.
 

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Any of the mid sixties stuff, I don't know when they finally changed their design. It was well known you could take the
battery out of a running chevy and drive it, not so with a ford.
 

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Make a solution of baking soda and water to the consistancy of runny pancake batter and let it run dow the stripped wire bundle and repeat this until no bubbles are seen. Than wash it off with waster then apply vaseline and retape wire. then get the battery charged or load tested to see if it is a servicable battery! if not i would get a new negative cable and battery just to get a no comeback fix on the starting system! Make sure to get NO baking soda inside battery or anywhere near the caps, it will ruin a battery if you get any of it inside the battery!
 

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Buy a new cable, It should bolt to the block.

:amen:

agree 110%! remove the cable and take it to your local auto parts counter and get them to match one up in length. this is your best bet to make sure you have eliminated the corrosion that is present. i have done this on other vehicles before. imho, it is to big of a pain in the a$$ to try and remove all of the corrosion present and even if you could, the cable is probably compromised a bit if there is as much corrosion as you say.
 

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I couldn't agree more. Just buy a new cable and be done with it.
 

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hi, walmart sell's ground wires, (cheap), long & short 1's.
also if your going to change it. it's best to go 2guage wire.
also instead of vaseline which will melt away, please buy die-electric grease. 100% better choise.
good luck,
gorilla
 

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its pretty easy to say replace the ground the wire by not even looking at how the ground wire is located in the truck. here is my post again from above.


its going to be hard to trace the wire because it gets bundled right by the battery with a bunch of other wires so you will have to tear apart the bundle to trace the wire. if your dead set on replacing the wire i would get some wire and attach the body, frame and engine to the negative battery post. i am afraid if you go with the dealership they will replace the entire bundle which could be expensive since it looks like the bundle has the alternator and starter wires and some other ones all shrink wrapped together. i would just replace the the corroded end.

Andrew
 

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You don't have to put it in the bundle, cut the ends of the old one off and run the new one tie rapped to the outside. Tie in the
other grounds to it with a marine cable end if necessary. You (not the OP) are making way to big a deal out of this.
 

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Any of the mid sixties stuff, I don't know when they finally changed their design. It was well known you could take the
battery out of a running chevy and drive it, not so with a ford.
I think the Fords started having alternators on them in '65 and the Chevs in '63. I was always afraid of damaging the diode rectifiers so never tried disconnecting the battery terminals while they were running. I've heard guys say you could tell if the charging system was OK by pulling the ground to see if they kept running, but I always used the meters instead. An alternator doesn't retain any residual magnetism and has to have the field energized before it can put out anything so the Delco regulators maybe kept the field relay pulled in (if running) and the battery terminal was pulled. I've got all the diagrams somewhere, but the Ford must not have been capable of doing that - probably a good thing and protected the system better.
 

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I think the Fords started having alternators on them in '65 and the Chevs in '63. I was always afraid of damaging the diode rectifiers so never tried disconnecting the battery terminals while they were running. I've heard guys say you could tell if the charging system was OK by pulling the ground to see if they kept running, but I always used the meters instead. An alternator doesn't retain any residual magnetism and has to have the field energized before it can put out anything so the Delco regulators maybe kept the field relay pulled in (if running) and the battery terminal was pulled. I've got all the diagrams somewhere, but the Ford must not have been capable of doing that - probably a good thing and protected the system better.
Your theory sounds right although I never gave it much thought. Chevy's had their rusted
out window channels, Fords had there bad resister wires... on and on. Toyotas have their
seatbelt retractors that need a dose of vitamins. Trademarks I call them.
 
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