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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to make a new thread for the 2012 Tundras out there since this appears to be a new problem. I posted this to the other thread about the 2007-2008 Tundras having the AIP failures and after talking with the Toyota service department realized this may be a new problem.

"I joined Tundra solutions just so I could post to this forum. I hate to say it but apparently Toyota has done nothing to fix this issue (besides warranty the part for 10 years / 150k miles. If you can call that a "fix"). I just bought a brand new 2012 Tundra DBL cab with the 5.7 and within the first 1,500 miles (yes, you read that correctly), the air injection pumps/valves failed. I bought this truck to replace a 93 toyota pickup with 223,000 miles on it. Needless to say I'm extremely dissapointed. There goes my Toyota loyalty. You would think they would of fixed this issue in the 5 years it's been happening. At least most of you got over 2000 miles on your trucks before it happened.
Oh well, it's covered by the warranty and I don't have to pay a dime. Still sucks to have a dead truck with such low miles."


AND, Here's the update I just posted:

"I posted a few pages back about my 2012 Tundra having the AI valves fail (P2442). One month later and my truck is still at the dealership. They have about 6 other 2012 Toyota Tundras with the same issue and there is no fix for this new issue. I went into the service department and talked with the service manager. He showed me the AI valves and the reed valves that are freezing up. Apparently Toyota engineers decided to heat the air in the AI system to alleviate the water/moisture issue. I don't know who these engineers are but apparently they've never taken a simple science course. What happens when you cool down hot, moist air... CONDENSATION. The valves are accumulating water and freezing up under Alaska's cold conditions. Since I bought the truck 2 months ago and 1 of those months it's been out of service I'm considering using the "lemon law" to get myself a new truck. It's been a pain in the ass and driving the provided 4runner rental really doesn't make up for my brand new truck being "dead". I might have to start a new thread related to the 2012's"

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/tundra/181377-air-induction-pump-101/

Apparently Toyota is advising the service department to hold on to the vehicles in the hopes that the temperatures will be warmer in the next few months... "solving" the problem. They had about 6 Tundras in the shop a month ago and I'm not sure if that number has increased or not. All that I know is that they aren't doing any repairs on the vehicles since there is no apparent fix for this issue.

One other thing to note is that my vehicle actually had a service record for when the dealer had the truck (before I purchased it). It threw the P2442 code with 7 miles on the odometer. They cleared the code and sold me the truck 18 miles and 2 weeks later. I'm not too sure what to do about that. They never mentioned anything when I bought the truck.

From the service record:
CHECK ENGINE LIGHT ~|~CUSTOMER STATES CHECK ENGINE LIGHT ON AND OTHER WARNING LIGHTS AS WELL. ~|~MIL ON P2442, CLEAR CODE AND TEST SYSTEM OK, NO FAULTS FOUN D AT THIS TIME, TEST DRIVE OK MIL OFF ~|~CLEARED CODES
 

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He showed me the AI valves and the reed valves that are freezing up. Apparently Toyota engineers decided to heat the air in the AI system to alleviate the water/moisture issue. I don't know who these engineers are but apparently they've never taken a simple science course. What happens when you cool down hot, moist air... CONDENSATION. The valves are accumulating water and freezing up under Alaska's cold conditions.
2007-2010 owners received their AIP warranty extension letters. I wondered if I'll have mine but read somewhere that 2011-2012 AIP's have been redesigned and will not have the extended AIP warranty. After reading your post our (2011-2012) AIP's are vulnerable, if not worst, as well. I really want that letter.
 

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One other thing to note is that my vehicle actually had a service record for when the dealer had the truck (before I purchased it). It threw the P2442 code with 7 miles on the odometer. They cleared the code and sold me the truck 18 miles and 2 weeks later. I'm not too sure what to do about that. They never mentioned anything when I bought the truck.

From the service record:
CHECK ENGINE LIGHT ~|~CUSTOMER STATES CHECK ENGINE LIGHT ON AND OTHER WARNING LIGHTS AS WELL. ~|~MIL ON P2442, CLEAR CODE AND TEST SYSTEM OK, NO FAULTS FOUN D AT THIS TIME, TEST DRIVE OK MIL OFF ~|~CLEARED CODES
That is f*cking unacceptable. You should definitely complain about this to toyota corporate or something. Don't do nothing, sounds like they are just taking advantage of you.
 

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2007-2010 owners received their AIP warranty extension letters. I wondered if I'll have mine but read somewhere that 2011-2012 AIP's have been redesigned and will not have the extended AIP warranty. After reading your post our (2011-2012) AIP's are vulnerable, if not worst, as well. I really want that letter.
I dropped the idea of buying a Tundra last year for this very reason. Toyota finally extended the warranty on the older models, but excluded the 2011/2012 models. My thinking was "if they fixed it, why not warranty it". Maybe they will include them later, but as of now, they're not covered. It also appears that their "fix" was ill conceived. How could Toyota complicate something so badly, when other manufacturers address exhaust specs with much less expensive components?
 

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Wow, 6 other trucks with the same AIP problem?! I'm stunned they're taking so long to get you guys back on the road! I'd be livid if it happened to me. Obviously, the common theme seems to be the very cold temps in AK. Certainly appears Toyota may have not done enough testing with the redesigned AIP's. Hearing stuff like this is really convincing me to consider buying a 100-125k extended warranty for my new 2011 before my 3/36 warranty expires. Never purchased one for a new vehicle before. Every vehicle has problems, but hearing quotes of $3k-$4k to fix issues with the AIP out-of-warranty has certainly gotten my attention--especially when it appears the extended warranty on the AIP only applies to the earlier 2007-2010 Tundras.

Certainly wish you luck with all this. With only 1500 miles on your truck and the fact Toyota doesn't seem to have any fix (permanent or temporary) at their disposal, the situation certainly seems f'd up to say the least. Hope you have some luck with the Alaska lemon-law if it comes down to that. Please keep us posted.
 

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A similar problem has occurred in my 2012 5.7 DBL cab with 292 miles. I'm not too impressed and had to wait a day to call them to come pick it up or I would have ripped their effin head off. There is no reason a brand new vehicle should fail, and if it is a known problem then it is even worse. I will wait to get the truck back before I pass judgment, but after researching the issue the last two days I am not liking what I am finding. This has happened to at least 2 others in this area, which is a cold climate area, and now I read that it has happened elsewhere. Yeah, not impressed!
 

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For those who do not just do the bypass, what is keeping you from doing it? My 2011 CM has not had any AIP issues (yet), but if it does, I plan to do the bypass ... I'd never pay the $3k-$4k to fix it with new pumps that would probably fail in time as well. Is there something I'm missing about the bypass solution?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For those who do not just do the bypass, what is keeping you from doing it? My 2011 CM has not had any AIP issues (yet), but if it does, I plan to do the bypass ... I'd never pay the $3k-$4k to fix it with new pumps that would probably fail in time as well. Is there something I'm missing about the bypass solution?
I agree, if this was happening on my 1993 Toyota pickup then I'd probably go with the bypass solution. But, these are brand new 2012 Tundras. Most of the ones I've seen with this problem have less than a few thousand miles on them (some even have less than a few hundred) and are only a few months old. Also, I'm pretty sure you'd void your warranty by doing the bypass solution on a new 2012 Tundra.
 

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I was so pissed when my AIP failed on my 2008 with 200,000 miles. I could not imagine it happening on a spanky new Truck. The only real option for Toyota to recover Truck loyalty is to fix the problem correctly, and then issue a FULL RECALL.
 

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I like tinkering as much as the next guy, but come on, 292 miles on a 2012 truck I just paid $30K+ for and I have to start bypassing to alleviate a problem? While the new, "dependable" truck is at the dealership I'll continue to run my 2003 Tundra, she's bulletproof.
 

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I was so happy when I purchased my 2007 Tundra but it has been less that Toyota reliable. My AIP has failed 2X in less than 10,000 miles. The truck only has 88,000K. They told me the same, under warranty until 150,000K, free rental yada yada. I bought this truck for reliability, between the brakes and AIP problems, I am not sold on buying another Toyota truck in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, Here's an update. After using the warranty book that was in the glove box I started a "dispute claim" with the National Center for Dispute Settlement. F.Y.I. The form is in the warranty book. This was after having my 2012 Tundra sit in the service department at the dealership for over 75 days total. It was pretty ridiculous. So, I call the dealership and they say they can't fix the issue but they can put in a "logging computer" and I'll get a $200 gift card for participating. I just figured I might as well get my truck back while I wait for the dispute process to go through. I show up at the dealership and they quickly ask me if I want my money back or if I want a replacement truck, having realized that I've started the dispute process. I tell them "just give me a new truck that hasn't had any history of these problems". The customer relations guy looks at me and says "well... I guess we can do that". They bought back my truck for the full purchase price and set me up with a new one. The sad part was that while I was at the dealership I found out they had bought back 12 other Tundras with the air injection issue. I guess I've dodged a bullet, but only time will tell. The people in the service department were pretty frantic when I brought my truck in the last time since they had already implemented Toyota's "fix" for the issue. Let's hope nobody has to deal with this issue in the future.... including me.
 

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I just want to know if they ever figured out if there was any specific reason for some to fail, and others to have no issues. I had my 2010 Tundra for 2 years in Michigan which is a cold climate, and never has the issue.

-Sent from my PHOTON with AutoGuide for Android
 

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I just want to know if they ever figured out if there was any specific reason for some to fail, and others to have no issues. I had my 2010 Tundra for 2 years in Michigan which is a cold climate, and never has the issue.

-Sent from my PHOTON with AutoGuide for Android
I think that it's like arthritis....eventually you'll get it [if you live long enough or have your Tundra long enough. In both cases some get it sooner than others. Mine [AIP failure] happened at 45,000 miles. Good luck.
 

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Duplicate -- Sorry
 

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I just want to know if they ever figured out if there was any specific reason for some to fail, and others to have no issues. I had my 2010 Tundra for 2 years in Michigan which is a cold climate, and never has the issue.
I'd put money on the fact Toyota already knows the exact fix and cost necessary to make the AIP problem go away. Although Toyota's bean-counters approved the additional cost for extending the warranty on the earlier (Gen 2) Tundra AIP's, they're probably balking at an overall, permanent fix for cost reasons (this fix is probably reserved for Gen 3). Until the accountants and risk-assessors at Toyota determine the cost of lost Tundra sales and bad press (due to the AIP issue) exceeds the cost of a permanent fix, we're stuck with the current situation. I'm sure the same process plays out at GM, Honda, and BMW, all the time. It is what it is.

For those of us with later model Tundras, the only feel-good option at our disposal (for now) is to purchase an OEM Toyota extended warranty. Gotta be careful with aftermarket warranties though. Water intrusion is the root cause of the AIP issue. Most aftermarket warranties won't cover water intrusion.
 

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If my AIP fails, I'm doing the bypass. I almost want to do it now preventatively in part b/c I know it's a completely unnecessary system put in place to attempt to appease tree huggers.
 
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