Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have changed countless brake pads but lately seems they all are tricked out in some fashion. Can someone give me a quick how to with do's and don't's? My Highlander is a 2005 model
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
It's pretty vanilla. All four pistons just push back in (they don't turn back in). Nothing special when I did it a few weeks ago. Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I just changed pads on my 2005 Highlander after 85,400 miles. The rear pads were almost to the wear indicator (noise maker), but the front pads could have made it to 100,000 miles. It was straight forward, just remove the two smaller bolts to pull the caliper w/piston off, and hang it by a wire from the strut tower. Then remove the two larger bolts to pull off the pad carrier (Disc Brake Cylinder Mounting), with the old pads. Replace one pad at a time and be sure to you don't make any mistakes. I used my 4 1/2 inch angle grinder to clean and roughen the discs (which were in very good condition without any scoring). Using a "C" clamp depress the piston to flush with the cylinder casting. NOTE: be sure you don't depress the brake pedal with the piston removed unless the "C" clamp is holding the piston back. Keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir because fluid will be pushed back into the reservoir and may have to be sucked out to keep it from overflowing (mine didn't). Lubricate the slide pins with proper brake grease. NOTE: The slide pin with the small plastic bushing on the end goes on the bottom (but you knew this because you were very observant taking it out).

The torque is different for the front and rear assembly. FRONT: Slide pin bolt = 25 ft-lbs; and larger mounting bolts = 79 ft-lbs. REAR: Slide pins = 32 ft-lbs; and large mounting bolts = 58 ft-lbs.

The only problem I had, beside getting my 77 year old body up and down from the ground, was the lower rear right side slide pin was very tightly binding and took a lot of force to pull it out after the threads were fully disengaged. I then had to clean up the pin and the bore it fit into. This added about an hour to the job. I'm sure the dealer would have replaced several parts if they were doing the job, but I feel very confident in my repair. Lubricate the pins well and be sure the rubber boots are properly seated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Hats off to you Tom!!! You are as old as my dad, I wish u good luck with you automobile.
Curious to ask shouldn't ur kids be the ones fixing these things for you!.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
It seems I should envy your father if he has a son that does his auto maintenance for him. My three sons are very buzy raising my grandkids and they never had the same interest in doing auto maintenance as I did/do. I still enjoy it, but it takes longer than it used to (two days for new brake pads ). When I was younger it would be a half day job. By the way, after I completed putting in new brake pads I flushed the entire brake system with 32 oz of new fluid. I used the suction method which was very easy to do by myself. This is the first brake fluid change in five years (too long), but I'll do it every two years from now on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Good on you Tom - and a pleasure to read.
Re: lower rear slide pins tightly binding
I think this may be a common problem with 1st generation Highlanders. The lower slide pin boot design and general location seems to promote moisture eventually working its way in. I really had difficulty with the rear lower pin on the driver's side on my '06 - probably had the same hour added to my job as you did cleaning it all up right.

If anyone is reading this and hasn't lubricated their slide pins in a while, I strongly recommend it. When I bought my well-maintained, used vehicle with 112,000 kms last spring, this was the only trouble spot highlighted by the mechanic that I had perform a full mechanical inspection before I made the purchase.
Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I did this about a month ago to my rear brakes and the slide pin was also the problem. It was frozen to the caliper, after Brake cleaner, PB Blaster, a BFH and then an air hammer the caliper finally came loose. So definitely lube the slide pins or you're gonna have a headache next time. Also, my 2001 HL has 242,000 miles on it which could also be a factor as to why it was so stubborn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
I did this about a month ago to my rear brakes and the slide pin was also the problem. It was frozen to the caliper, after Brake cleaner, PB Blaster, a BFH and then an air hammer the caliper finally came loose. So definitely lube the slide pins or you're gonna have a headache next time. Also, my 2001 HL has 242,000 miles on it which could also be a factor as to why it was so stubborn.
Are u saying your rears last 242K miles.?:confused:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top