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I just acquired a 2002 Tundra 2WD V8. 336K miles on it and still running like new. At this mileage, is there anything specific that I should look at or be concerned for? I just got a check engine light and, after a scan, it looks like I may need to replace the EVAP Canister. I took a look under the hood and it appeared to be a loose hose. I plugged it back in and turned the truck back on, however, I might have to drive for a bit. In any case, I believe I have that covered for now. Anything else I should look into? One thing I noticed is that when I go over 65MPH the back end of my truck seems unbalanced and tends to shake a bit. I'm guessing that's an alignment issue? I am looking forward to purchasing a new suspension and tires for the beauty. Im pretty excited. Any tips / advice would be great!

PS. Im very into DIY fixes. I worked on my 05 Corolla for most of its issues.
Cheers!
 

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Welcome, I also have a 2002 Tundra. If you have a scanner you can clear that code and as you said drive 100 miles for the system to accept the set-up. I installed a cold air intake and a throttle body spacer just cuz I like the sound and believe that un-restricting air flow is a good idea. Anyway I had a returning P171, P174 code and re-set the codes many times. Then I found that I had a hose that had become disconnected. Hooked it back up, cleared code and have driven 700 miles "code free". Chap
 

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Welcome, I also have a 2002 Tundra. If you have a scanner you can clear that code and as you said drive 100 miles for the system to accept the set-up. I installed a cold air intake and a throttle body spacer just cuz I like the sound and believe that un-restricting air flow is a good idea. Anyway I had a returning P171, P174 code and re-set the codes many times. Then I found that I had a hose that had become disconnected. Hooked it back up, cleared code and have driven 700 miles "code free". Chap
Hey Chap!

Do I have to clear the code up or will it remove itself after driving x amount of miles with the hose connected back up? Cold air intake and a throttle body spacer??? ill look into this! Id love to hear this different sound. Thanks for the reply.
- Ceja310
 

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The upgrades are not real big "fuel savers". I did gain about 2mpg. I have a 4.7 and first went with this cold air intake. Measurable performance increase. About $100

Then this Throttle Body Spacer ($65) ; Red Throttle Body Spacer Fit 00-02 TOYOTA TUNDRA 4.7L & 01-02 SEQUOIA V8 | eBay
NOTE: There are no instructions with the spacer. Installs with the "O" ring towards intake. I would add a couple of dabs of non-hardening permatex to hold the "O" in place. There a couple of You Tube posts on similar products.
152810


152811
 

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If your CEL doesn't go off after the evap test runs, you may have more than just the one problem with the loose hose. I just had to troubleshoot evap codes (P0441 and P0446) on my 02 Sequoia. The Toyota evap test goes through 11 steps to check the system and depending on the pressure sensor readings, it makes a decision to set or reset the cel. Lots of good youtube videos that explain how it works. We have the "intrusive" evap system in these year models so you want to learn how that system works as there are other variations in earlier and later year models with different number of solenoids and pressure sensor setups. My problem ended up being the solenoid on the canister was stuck open. But the test can fail due to leaks in any part of the system as well as any one of the 3 solenoids not operating correctly. I posted about my experience here:

used evap canisters from relatively low mileage vehicles can be found on ebay for about $125. New ones for about $250. The various solenoids go for about $30-$50. But you want to know what part is bad before throwing parts at it.
 

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If your CEL doesn't go off after the evap test runs, you may have more than just the one problem with the loose hose. I just had to troubleshoot evap codes (P0441 and P0446) on my 02 Sequoia. The Toyota evap test goes through 11 steps to check the system and depending on the pressure sensor readings, it makes a decision to set or reset the cel. Lots of good youtube videos that explain how it works. We have the "intrusive" evap system in these year models so you want to learn how that system works as there are other variations in earlier and later year models with different number of solenoids and pressure sensor setups. My problem ended up being the solenoid on the canister was stuck open. But the test can fail due to leaks in any part of the system as well as any one of the 3 solenoids not operating correctly. I posted about my experience here:

used evap canisters from relatively low mileage vehicles can be found on ebay for about $125. New ones for about $250. The various solenoids go for about $30-$50. But you want to know what part is bad before throwing parts at it.

This is actually a really helpful comment. Thank you! Ill have to review this once im off work. :) Thanks again!
 

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I just acquired a 2002 Tundra 2WD V8. 336K miles on it and still running like new. At this mileage, is there anything specific that I should look at or be concerned for? I just got a check engine light and, after a scan, it looks like I may need to replace the EVAP Canister. I took a look under the hood and it appeared to be a loose hose. I plugged it back in and turned the truck back on, however, I might have to drive for a bit. In any case, I believe I have that covered for now. Anything else I should look into? One thing I noticed is that when I go over 65MPH the back end of my truck seems unbalanced and tends to shake a bit. I'm guessing that's an alignment issue? I am looking forward to purchasing a new suspension and tires for the beauty. Im pretty excited. Any tips / advice would be great!

PS. Im very into DIY fixes. I worked on my 05 Corolla for most of its issues.
Cheers!
I have the 2002 2WD v8 as you do, 270k miles since I bought it new. A drive belt and flushing the coolant is a stitch in time😅, I have never had any real issues with mine... she is uncommonly reliable! I installed a K&N air filter at purchase, which likely affords a spare 1-2 mpg. Enjoy!
 

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I just acquired a 2002 Tundra 2WD V8. 336K miles on it and still running like new. At this mileage, is there anything specific that I should look at or be concerned for? I just got a check engine light and, after a scan, it looks like I may need to replace the EVAP Canister. I took a look under the hood and it appeared to be a loose hose. I plugged it back in and turned the truck back on, however, I might have to drive for a bit. In any case, I believe I have that covered for now. Anything else I should look into? One thing I noticed is that when I go over 65MPH the back end of my truck seems unbalanced and tends to shake a bit. I'm guessing that's an alignment issue? I am looking forward to purchasing a new suspension and tires for the beauty. Im pretty excited. Any tips / advice would be great!

PS. Im very into DIY fixes. I worked on my 05 Corolla for most of its issues.
Cheers!
I am the proud owner of a 2009 Tundie with 178k miles (I bought it in 2015 with 65k miles). It’a becoming a road warrior for my new job and I’m excited me and my Tundie will be driving all over the great State of Texas!

So what I did to get it into shape for its new job: shocks, drain, flush and refill ALL fluids... Brake, fuel injection/ induction, transmission, differential, cooling system, power steering. A tune up with new spark plugs and a front end alignment.

The shop is amazed what fantastic shape it’s in for its age and I love it!
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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All due respect from a former owner of a 2002 4.7 AC....

Your "throttle body spacer"? Junk.

Your "cold-air intake"? You just took a stock intake box (which is a true "CAI" and flows 125% of WOT air on an OEM paper filter) and turned it into a "hot-air intake" by opening the airflow to the hot engine bay air. All you bought was REDUCED combustion efficiency via lower density ambient air -- and a noisier engine bay.

And, all claims as to horsepower and MPG increases based on these bolt-ons has been thoroughly debunked by multiple long-term, systematic, and detailed testing done years ago.

You can't cheat the ECU. The stoichiometric ratio is where it's at fellas.
 

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...I installed a K&N air filter at purchase, which likely affords a spare 1-2 mpg...
Hate to burst your bubble, but all you did was increase the amount of silica ingested into your intake, accumulated on your MAF sensor, etc. An air filter will NOT magically buy you 1-2mpg.

Suggestion: do a UOA with Blackstone Labs now and again in 10,000 miles. It'll show you the difference. The K&N doesn't filter fine particulate matter worth a damn and it WILL show up in your oil.

Trying to save you some $$$ and wear and tear in the long run.

* Disclosure: I'm coffee buddies with the founder of K&N.
 

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Hate to burst your bubble, but all you did was increase the amount of silica ingested into your intake, accumulated on your MAF sensor, etc. An air filter will NOT magically buy you 1-2mpg.

Suggestion: do a UOA with Blackstone Labs now and again in 10,000 miles. It'll show you the difference. The K&N doesn't filter fine particulate matter worth a damn and it WILL show up in your oil.

Trying to save you some $$$ and wear and tear in the long run.

* Disclosure: I'm coffee buddies with the founder of K&N.
my Tundie came with one too when I bought it at the dealership and it was the first thing I ripped out. What a messy job that doesn’t give you squat!
 

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Hate to burst your bubble, but all you did was increase the amount of silica ingested into your intake, accumulated on your MAF sensor, etc. An air filter will NOT magically buy you 1-2mpg.

Suggestion: do a UOA with Blackstone Labs now and again in 10,000 miles. It'll show you the difference. The K&N doesn't filter fine particulate matter worth a damn and it WILL show up in your oil.

Trying to save you some $$$ and wear and tear in the long run.

* Disclosure: I'm coffee buddies with the founder of K&N.
Ik

Well I was going to warn him about K/N type filters allowing so much fine dirt in destroying internals over time too but you beat me to it.
Hard to beat K/N on race cars but those engines get rebuilt every season or two. They just suck dirt as a daily street car filter.
Been there done that yrs go, very expensive mistake.
 
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