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2002 Sequoia SR5 4WD
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Recently picked this up from a friend with ~346k KM (215k Miles) on the clock. Seems to run fine and I am in the process of establishing a baseline (going to flush ATF, Diff, Transfer case fluids etc etc).

Today I swapped out the spark plugs and YIKES! The gap difference is quite significant as they used spark plugs that are not recommended. The manual says you can use either Denso K20R-U (which is what the dealership sold me) or NGK BKR6EYA. However, whenever these plugs were replaced (not sure when) they used NGK BKR6EGP. Could there be any lasting damage caused by this?
 

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It'll be fine. I bet the gap used to be correct when they were new. I pulled plugs out of mine that might have been factory plugs at 200k miles. The gap was huge because the electrode had worn so far. But the truck ran great before and after the plug change.
 

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Nice truck. That's my favorite two-tone color combo. I believe both those NGK plugs are spec'd for the truck. It's probably just a different metal (copper vs. iridium, etc.).
 

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Did mine not to long ago when i first got it. 234,000 and dont if they where ever changed. The gap was massive like over .10 big. I replaced them with ngk v-power 7990. Have used ngk in eveything ive owned. Never an issue. The plugs that you took out were just the platinum version oem also good plugs although i prefer the copper core.
 

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2002 Sequoia SR5 4WD
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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the information people, looking forward to driving this for a long time!
 

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thanks for the information people, looking forward to driving this for a long time!
I see that you’re planning on flushing the ATF on your truck. I have heard differing opinions on doing this to a high mileage Toyota. I’m wondering if the pros out there would weigh in on this. Thanks
 

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Recently picked this up from a friend with ~346k KM (215k Miles) on the clock. Seems to run fine and I am in the process of establishing a baseline (going to flush ATF, Diff, Transfer case fluids etc etc).

Today I swapped out the spark plugs and YIKES! The gap difference is quite significant as they used spark plugs that are not recommended. The manual says you can use either Denso K20R-U (which is what the dealership sold me) or NGK BKR6EYA. However, whenever these plugs were replaced (not sure when) they used NGK BKR6EGP. Could there be any lasting damage caused by this?
Well I do agree with jbarnett2501 about the gap was most likely correct when the plugs were new. As for excessive electrode wear on spark plugs YES it does cause other issues. 1. Excessively worn electrodes on the plugs cause the spark to be come weaker and weaker. 2. A weaker spark burns less of the fuel. 3 Less burned fuel is registered by the O2 sensors (upstreams that tune the air fuel mixture) in turn the OS sensors tell the ECU that the truck is running rich and the fuel needs to be backed off. 4. When the fuel is backed off the engine will run in a lean mode (maybe with in range of the ecu) but is not good for the engine. 5. Running lean causes high NOX (or cylinder temps). So thought it may seam drive drive fine and have no check engine light running daily in a lean (low fuel) ratio causes extra wear on the bearings, seals, gaskets, sensors, and oil. Thus it make a big difference. The older style plugs should be changed every 20,000 to 35,000 miles. I live in California so to make it simple. I do Plugs, Coolant, Transmission drain and fill, K&N Filter cleaing, MASS Air flow cleaning every 2 years. It is usually done 2 months before smog. I have 311,000 miles with no issues yet. I spent 4 months using my truck to experiment with grounding kits to effect the efficiency of the spark plugs in my truck. Finally found the grounding points on the cylinder heads and intake manifold to increase my MPG. I do average 17-18mpg in town and 23-24 on the highway. I have done other mods ass well.
 

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The old fine wire plugs will work fine; they are a long life plug. The new plug is the OE plug which is what I run in our 2001. They are good for 30K miles or so.
 

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Most people do not know that Iridiums are bad for older vehicles. Here is the explanation and yes we did test the theory on a Dyno Smog machine. Older style plugs such as nickle, copper, and platinum are considered high voltage plugs. Thus the older ignition coils are on the higher voltage/higher resistance side of the spectrum. Iridium plugs are lower voltage/lower resistance plugs. So the newer ignition system are lower voltage/lower resistance. When an Iridium plug is put in an older vehicle with a high voltage/resistance ignition coil setup the plugs run HOTTER thus raising cylinder temp above the reliable temp for that engine. When we tested this theory we Put NGK Iridiums in a 2000 Toyota Rav4 and ran a smog test on a Smog Dyno machine. The NOX (cylinder temps) were 3 times higher then Toyota designed the engine for and the vehicle failed miserably. Then we put in the recommended old school copper (v) NGK plugs and ran the test again. NOX dropped to the designed temp for the Toyota engine and passed smog easily. So Iridiums are not good for 2000-2006 Tundras/Sequoias. Extended High NOX will kill an engine in the long run and take away reliability. I hope the info helps any who read this. I do lots of research to better vehicles reliability and mpg over manufacture specs.
 

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I see that you’re planning on flushing the ATF on your truck. I have heard differing opinions on doing this to a high mileage Toyota. I’m wondering if the pros out there would weigh in on this. Thanks
This has been addressed in other threads and I would encourage you to read up on them, but the short version is it's probably best that you change the ATF with quality lube, not 10 minute oil change stuff.

I was lucky enough to buy my truck just after the previous owner changed the plugs with platinum NGKs. Won't have to worry about them for a while. I do dump fuel injector treatment into my tank frequently, so maybe that has some cleaning qualities to them as well.
 
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