Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Everyone says to use 87 in my 2014 Tundra CM Lmt. beacause that's what the manual says to use. Actually, the manual says to use "87 or higher." Just wondering what the best experiences out there have been...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
I'm sure many others will chime in, but my experience has been, no improvement with higher octane, for normal driving situations.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
I'm sure many others will chime in, but my experience has been, no improvement with higher octane, for normal driving situations.
This^^. It also helps to let us know what region you are in and if you are running conventional gas or 10% Etoh or more. Most of the time 87 grade is slightly above 87 in both cases(conv,oxy blended). Right now were blending our RBOB to minimum 88 RON and 80 MON = 84 R+M/2. Add 10%Etoh and were up to 92.4ish RON and 82.5ish MON equaling 87.45 R+M/2.

In other words 87 is fine.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
I ran 92 for about six weeks to see if I noticed anything. What I found out was it felt exactly the same as running 87. I didn't get any better fuel economy or noticible power gains. So I've been using 87 octane and will continue to do so untill I put the S/C on it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
I honestly dont know. Since 2007 ive ran all grades of gas and I must say I prefer 93. It seems to run just a tad bit better but maybe its just me thinking that. But at 120,xxx miles ive been running 93 for quite a while and it seems SLIGHTLY better mpg on the highway only. Ive noticed my exhaust gets pretty black and smutty now maybe I should experiment with gas again?

Just to add an extra two cents; I noticed that my accord 2.4L seems to be faster with 93 but I swear it seems like it gets better mileage with the 87. Sometimes I feel like all gas is the same and the companies are lying
 

· Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Well, I know these Tundras do not like the winter blend of gas, my mpg has droped down to 14.0 , even tried the shell vpower and no difference. either bad gas from the shell or it is not that great in the winter.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I've always used Mobil Super (its either 91 or 93). I bought the truck new in April 2014 and consistently got 14-16 MPG's through late fall. The past 2 months I've seen it decrease to about 11-13 MPG's. I live in Massachusetts so it has been getting colder, but I don't let it "warm up" for more than 2 minutes. I'm not sure when the gas stations make the switch to winter blend, but I'm willing to bet my MPG decrease is a result of it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I use Chevron 92 Octane since that's what I have been using on my very old Tacoma and all our other cars. Believe it or not any time I use 87, it is sluggish going up hill. The Tacoma is much livelier & more responsive using 92 ... maybe with Tundra being a v8 it makes no difference but I have only used 92.


I don't care about the gas millage and try to use the best gas. I have also read a lot about 87 vs. 92 and that there is no difference and waste of $ ... but like I said, I can feel the difference especially going uphill.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Use regular 87 octane unleaded fuel as Toyota suggests, using any other octane and you'll spend more money for zero gains.


While some brands of gas put in better cleaning agents in their premium fuels you can do the same thing for a lot cheaper by adding a bottle of Red Line Complete SI-1 fuel cleaner to a tank of gas every 3,000 miles. Red Line works the best out of ALL the other cleaners on the market.

 

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Higher octane fuels are simply less volatile, meaning they resist detonation under compression more than lower octane fuels. They serve a purpose in higher compression engines, but are generally a waste of money in lower compression engines engineered to use lower octane fuel. In some cases, higher octane fuels can cause driveability issues in lower compression engines. The exception can be in high mileage lower compression engines that have acquired cylinder head deposits and are experiencing pinging or premature detonation under load. In this case stepping up a grade or two in octane rating may help prevent pinging. Premature detonation is a major cause of engine failure and the possibility of driveability issues like rough idle or hesitation from moving up in octane are a reasonable trade off to pinging.
 

· Driver of 2 Tundra trucks
Joined
·
6,720 Posts
Everyone says to use 87 in my 2014 Tundra CM Lmt. beacause that's what the manual says to use. Actually, the manual says to use "87 or higher." Just wondering what the best experiences out there have been...
87 in both of my V8 Tundra trucks... I will run a tank of Shell premium if I feel the engine running a little rough, but that's rare.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top