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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright fellas i need some advice on some mods for my 4WD 2010 5.7L TRD 1 and a half cab tundra.

Ive heard numerous opinions on lifts, shocks, overcoils, tires and so on. I need some good advice on what is best for SAND performance (and a bit of rock...but nothing to serious) but without a large compromise on road performance (for the rest of the family).

Would appreciate if you guys could spare your thoughts on some past experience or knowledge on the matter.

Ive also looked at the possibility of getting a company (either RBP or Nitto?) just doing it all for me.

Thanks,
Ozzy
 

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4WD 2010 5.7L TRD 1 and a half cab tundra.
1 1/2 cab...so is that 1 1/2 of a double cab or 1 1/2 of a Crewmax or is it just 1 1/2 cab of a regular cab. :birthday:
 

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The best thing you can do for sand is to air down your tires. They will get much better traction with less air in them. Start out by just dropping a few pounds at a time until you get it where you like it. A good A/T tire is all you need. Unless you are going to jump it I would just keep the suspension stock for now. Upgrade as you go.
 

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Sand, as in driving on it, or as in driving fast on it?

As already mentioned, airing down the tires will help most. Your first modification should be a tire pressure gauge and a way to air back up, whether a high-volume compressor or a CO2 tank. If you have the time and/or funds, the compressor won't go empty in the middle of nowhere. Look at the Extreme Outback products, can't go wrong with those. You'll of course need an air tank and some plumbing, but any vendor who carries the EO products is likely to have the rest of the equipment.

Next would be a good sand tire...most all-terrain tires work very well in sand. Get the largest you can fit on the truck, and lean toward a tall tire rather than a wide tire. It will handle better on the road, and the contact patch grows forward and backward more than it does sideways, as you air down. There's no reason not to run a mud-oriented tire, but the caveat remains, you must air down, because the more open-lugged designs are prone to digging more in sand, and your truck has more than enough power to spin an aggressive tire in sand, which will result in a buried tire.

Get a pair of Quick Fist clamps, and mount a shovel in the bed...under the bed rail, over the hump of the wheel well is a great place. A long HiLift jack will fit on the other side, mounted on a 4xRac or whatever they're called (made by HiLift). I'd recommend just getting the "Extreme" version...sounds goofy, but you get the top section which can be used as a clamp, very handy. Pick up a base of some sort...metal, plastic, wood...and a Lift Mate. It will be much easier to dig out of holes, that way.

A pair of sections of 2x2x2" fiberglass grating is a perfect way to extract the truck from deep, soft sand. They have never let me down. I have two panels about 5' x 2', and two panels about 2' x 2', both of the same 2x2x2" grid.

That's how I get through sand...the EO compressor isn't mounted yet, so I'm still using a 15# CO2 tank...but the compressor is in hand and is the long term solution.

A pair of lockers would be a great addition to the truck...or at least the rear. It's much harder to dig in, when power is transferred equally to both tires. ARB is your best option here, hands down...road manners just like stock, when unlocked, and an alloy steel full spool when locked, with four spider gears instead of the usual two included with stock carriers.

You probably wanted to hear about lift options :D...

If you're just going for a drive, a Bilstein or Old Man Emu kit is enough, and they are inexpensive.

If you want to drive fast, the first thing to examine is your budget, and it's important to be honest about how fast, and how much of a budget you can work with. Simple solutions begin around 1500USD, more complicated and better performing solutions can run ten times that. There's no need for a long travel kit, if you're really just going for a quick drive, and width constraints may make it a poor option as well, compared to the performance you can gain from a simple coilover and upper control arm replacement on a 2nd-generation Tundra.

If fast is the case, you'll want to talk to Camburg or Radflo, and look at 2.5" diameter shocks for the front, with remote reservoirs. Keep the valving light on the rebound side, probably a stack of 0.010 or 0.012 shims, and heavy on the compression side, either 0.015 or 0.020 and possibly a flutter stack. Glenn at Radflo has been very helpful regarding valving suggestions on my own truck, I suggest you talk with him.

You'll be wanting rear shocks, so the rear axle can keep up with the front. What springs you run depends on what load you're likely to be carrying. I don't know enough about the AAL products available for your truck to recommend one. Deaver and Alcan can both make replacement spring packs, if you are looking for the best possible performance.

Also keep in mind, the faster you go, the closer you need to be to street pressure, so if digging begins to be a problem, you'll definitely want a locker to keep out of trouble.

Last thing, a lift only lets you clear a larger tire on the street. As soon as it flexes, it's likely to rub, but you may be able to get away with a larger tire by virtue of the wheel well being large enough to clear that tire when it's pointed straight ahead, which is hopefully where it's sitting when you're moving fast through sand. If you're finding the tire you want is rubbing, you'll need to trim, and possibly consider a set of fiberglass fenders.

-Sean
 

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You are not going to want to go with RBP or Nitto - mostly because nitto is just a tire and they are running the camburg kit. I run in the sand dunes all the time - I have 37 inch BFG projects and when you take them down to 10psi its like driving on asphalt. I also run a camburg kit with a ton of extras from a company called SMP in California.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sand, as in driving on it, or as in driving fast on it?

As already mentioned, airing down the tires will help most. Your first modification should be a tire pressure gauge and a way to air back up, whether a high-volume compressor or a CO2 tank. If you have the time and/or funds, the compressor won't go empty in the middle of nowhere. Look at the Extreme Outback products, can't go wrong with those. You'll of course need an air tank and some plumbing, but any vendor who carries the EO products is likely to have the rest of the equipment.

Next would be a good sand tire...most all-terrain tires work very well in sand. Get the largest you can fit on the truck, and lean toward a tall tire rather than a wide tire. It will handle better on the road, and the contact patch grows forward and backward more than it does sideways, as you air down. There's no reason not to run a mud-oriented tire, but the caveat remains, you must air down, because the more open-lugged designs are prone to digging more in sand, and your truck has more than enough power to spin an aggressive tire in sand, which will result in a buried tire.

Get a pair of Quick Fist clamps, and mount a shovel in the bed...under the bed rail, over the hump of the wheel well is a great place. A long HiLift jack will fit on the other side, mounted on a 4xRac or whatever they're called (made by HiLift). I'd recommend just getting the "Extreme" version...sounds goofy, but you get the top section which can be used as a clamp, very handy. Pick up a base of some sort...metal, plastic, wood...and a Lift Mate. It will be much easier to dig out of holes, that way.

A pair of sections of 2x2x2" fiberglass grating is a perfect way to extract the truck from deep, soft sand. They have never let me down. I have two panels about 5' x 2', and two panels about 2' x 2', both of the same 2x2x2" grid.

That's how I get through sand...the EO compressor isn't mounted yet, so I'm still using a 15# CO2 tank...but the compressor is in hand and is the long term solution.

A pair of lockers would be a great addition to the truck...or at least the rear. It's much harder to dig in, when power is transferred equally to both tires. ARB is your best option here, hands down...road manners just like stock, when unlocked, and an alloy steel full spool when locked, with four spider gears instead of the usual two included with stock carriers.

You probably wanted to hear about lift options :D...

If you're just going for a drive, a Bilstein or Old Man Emu kit is enough, and they are inexpensive.

If you want to drive fast, the first thing to examine is your budget, and it's important to be honest about how fast, and how much of a budget you can work with. Simple solutions begin around 1500USD, more complicated and better performing solutions can run ten times that. There's no need for a long travel kit, if you're really just going for a quick drive, and width constraints may make it a poor option as well, compared to the performance you can gain from a simple coilover and upper control arm replacement on a 2nd-generation Tundra.

If fast is the case, you'll want to talk to Camburg or Radflo, and look at 2.5" diameter shocks for the front, with remote reservoirs. Keep the valving light on the rebound side, probably a stack of 0.010 or 0.012 shims, and heavy on the compression side, either 0.015 or 0.020 and possibly a flutter stack. Glenn at Radflo has been very helpful regarding valving suggestions on my own truck, I suggest you talk with him.

You'll be wanting rear shocks, so the rear axle can keep up with the front. What springs you run depends on what load you're likely to be carrying. I don't know enough about the AAL products available for your truck to recommend one. Deaver and Alcan can both make replacement spring packs, if you are looking for the best possible performance.

Also keep in mind, the faster you go, the closer you need to be to street pressure, so if digging begins to be a problem, you'll definitely want a locker to keep out of trouble.

Last thing, a lift only lets you clear a larger tire on the street. As soon as it flexes, it's likely to rub, but you may be able to get away with a larger tire by virtue of the wheel well being large enough to clear that tire when it's pointed straight ahead, which is hopefully where it's sitting when you're moving fast through sand. If you're finding the tire you want is rubbing, you'll need to trim, and possibly consider a set of fiberglass fenders.

-Sean
All this advice is massivley helpful buddy...thanks so much.

Ok a few things now...to be honest with you its going to be a mix but i think the main part of my drives are going to be slow-speed based dune climbing...so ground clearance is a big concern for me...because the tundra is a relatively long wheelbase for a off-road car it can easily become ridged on the top of a dune. So its not so much gassing straight down sandy tracks and more going over and around untouched sand dunes. (and not small ones...im talking anywhere from 10-300 feet tall :) )

As for the small things like the air compressor and jack...i couldnt agree more (and deflating the tires is the oldest trick in the book :) )

So i couldn't really decipher whether a lift was good or a no-go zone. I imagine you'll suggest it not be to high?

And i agree with the tires....funnily enough i also see alot of guys with tires designed for snow hitting the dunes doing really well. Their tires are really tall and have a high wall...rather then the width...and don't have deep groves in their tread.

Im probably going to have to buy all this from suppliers and get it shipped out...so is the installation straight forward or will i have to go to a off-road garage (which isn't an issue).

Thanks again,
Ozzy
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You are not going to want to go with RBP or Nitto - mostly because nitto is just a tire and they are running the camburg kit. I run in the sand dunes all the time - I have 37 inch BFG projects and when you take them down to 10psi its like driving on asphalt. I also run a camburg kit with a ton of extras from a company called SMP in California.

Nice man...thanks for the advice.

What extras are you thinking are the best that you run? And which camburg kit do you run?

And 10 psi...do you not worry that the tire itself with come off the rim?
 

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My advice is the coilover, it has excellent road manners, and the proper control off-road. Just don't crank them up sky high and you will have a comfortable ride with increased ground clearance, control and overall stability of the vehicle.

I try not to make these sales pitch's and more of my personal advice, but the I have had lots of success with the our coilover over at Camburg. Tanner Foust visited today in his Tundra, with our Coilover and UCA.

Give me a call at the shop, mention this post (I have a terrible memory as far as screen names and what not) and I will take care of you, along with the rest of TS.
 

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You are not going to want to go with RBP or Nitto - mostly because nitto is just a tire and they are running the camburg kit. I run in the sand dunes all the time - I have 37 inch BFG projects and when you take them down to 10psi its like driving on asphalt. I also run a camburg kit with a ton of extras from a company called SMP in California.

dude, details on your truck! it looks bad ass!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think i will probably have to go camburg! Any idea on how high the lift can possibly be with the coilover and upper arm?

Thanks
 

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